I am a CRNP and the pay has is too low, can I afford to become a CRNA

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    I just fininshed NP school, passed my test and currently working, however I cant afford to stay an NP, I was an agency ER nurse for 5 years making at least 80,000-90,000/year because of overtime, night shift diffs, etc.,, but now, I make only 74,000/year(because if have no experience) I have more expenses, because of grad school loans. So to me I am not sure what to do, looking at the overall salary for NP's is( max) 90,000/year. Looking at the CRNA seems worth it, doing what you enjoy(advance nursing) with the compensation. However my dilemna is do I really want to start over, take another, delay starting a family again( I delayed for np school). Do you guys think that a CRNA program would accept my science courses, I mean I just graduated in Dec 2006. Well overall some advice, should I suffer through the low pay and supplement with another job, or go back to school?
    Last edit by kskites on Sep 9, '07 : Reason: spelling
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    Quote from kskites
    should I suffer through the low pay and supplement with another job, or go back to school?
    Why not join all of the other NP's (that unfortunately discovered after graduating that they could make more money and have less stress and responsibility by working as a staff nurse :trout and go back to school for a certification that is worth its weight in gold. It's worth the extra investment in both time and money. As a result, you will be pleasantly surprised at the discovery of just how many NP's have returned to school to do just that.
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    It all depends on the anesthesia school. As a CRNP who also became a CRNA, I had to take all science courses all over again, since some if not most science courses in anesthesia school focused on "anesthesia" effects on the body.

    I would check on each school's requirements (those that you plan to apply to).

    Another issue that you might want to think about is the INTERVIEW process and what answer you will give the committee once they ask you "why do you want to become a CRNA? You just recently became a CRNP?"

    Answering, "Because I want to make more money" is not going to go well with them in my own opinion.

    I too am a CRNP and decided later on, after practicing for several years to become a CRNA. Although, my motives were entirely different than most people, I decided to become a dual role APN so that I can work in a dual role capacity in a rural setting. I will soon be realizing my dream in a few months, and will be working in a rural hospital in a DUAL role capacity in New Hampshire.

    Some of the NPs that I know of who also became CRNAs are no longer working as a CRNP. Many, if not most admit that's because the money is better working as a CRNA alone. The committee members for CRNA schools know this. Therefore, I do believe that they would rather accept a CRNP that is "seasoned" and have several years of advance practice experience under their belts, over one who just recently graduated. It also shows some type of committment by you to becoming a CRNP and working for a couple years, then going back to CRNA school.
    KAMARAkamara likes this.
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    If pay is your only motivation to become a CRNA, I'd say don't do it.
    PhillyBSN likes this.
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    Do you guys think that a CRNA program would accept my science courses, I mean I just graduated in Dec 2006. Well overall some advice, should I suffer through the low pay and supplement with another job, or go back to school?
    Go to www.gaswork.com and you can see all the CRNA salaries for yourself. As for your NP classes, I know that the CRNA programs I've applied to here in TX will not accept grad nurses courses from any other school in place of theirs. For example, if you took advanced pathophys in your program the CRNA programs here won't accept it and you must retake theirs. However, you will rack up a lot more debt doing this so give it lots of thought.:spin:
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    I'm not sure about other schools but Rush University offers a Post-Certificate Masters in Nursing Anesthesia, so basically you will not have to repeat your core graduate classes, it's for those who already have a MSN degree. I don't know the details or length of this program but it's something you can look into. Maybe other schools offer something similar.
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    Just to clarify... What Rush offers is a post-certificate master's, not a post-master's certificate. It is for CRNAs who are certified but don't have a master's, not APNs who want a certificate. I think there are some programs out there that are post-master's certificates, though.
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    Quote from chococherry
    I'm not sure about other schools but Rush University offers a Post-Certificate Masters in Nursing Anesthesia, so basically you will not have to repeat your core graduate classes, it's for those who already have a MSN degree. I don't know the details or length of this program but it's something you can look into. Maybe other schools offer something similar.
    The Post-Certificate Master's Program at Rush is for those practicing CRNA's that do not currently hold a master's degree. They must already be a licensed CRNA to enter this program...so it would not pertain to this situation at all.
  11. 0
    Quote from kskites
    I just fininshed NP school, passed my test and currently working, however I cant afford to stay an NP, I was an agency ER nurse for 5 years making at least 80,000-90,000/year because of overtime, night shift diffs, etc.,, but now, I make only 74,000/year(because if have no experience) I have more expenses, because of grad school loans. So to me I am not sure what to do, looking at the overall salary for NP's is( max) 90,000/year. Looking at the CRNA seems worth it, doing what you enjoy(advance nursing) with the compensation. However my dilemna is do I really want to start over, take another, delay starting a family again( I delayed for np school). Do you guys think that a CRNA program would accept my science courses, I mean I just graduated in Dec 2006. Well overall some advice, should I suffer through the low pay and supplement with another job, or go back to school?
    Check out this program:

    http://www2.oakland.edu/nursing/file...pr_24_2007.pdf


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