Aspiring CRNA - Nursing School and my Biological Clock?!

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    Attention to those who have been accepted to CRNA school (or very knowledgeable in specifics of the ICU requirements). I will be entering an accelerated BSN program in Spring '14, which concludes at the end of Spring '16. I am overly determined to apply to the KPSA for NA school after a couple years of high acuity ICU experience. Let's say, hypothetically, I rock the ICU and get accepted to KPSA on the first try. The soonest I'd be done with NA school would be January 2020. What I haven't mentioned, however, is that I will be turning 30 next month. Which means in Jan 2020 I'll be three months away from my 37th birthday. I don't see any 'best time' between now and then to have a child. And no, not ready right now, for many reasons. To get to my actual question - seeing how KPSA and many other worthy NA schools require a 'minimum of 1 year of current full time nursing experience in adult critical care ICU' (word for word KPSA requirement).. lets say (another hypothetical) that I try to conceive during gaining my ICU experience.. would maternity leave break my 'current full-time' status, thus break eligibility for KPSA, requiring me to start the minimum one year full-time time clock in the ICU all over again? Let me say, kindly.. I'm not looking for anyone to teach me any life lessons about needing more time gaining experience and attempting to plan out the schedule of my life like this. I realize God laughs at type-A life-planners like me All I'm inquiring are two things: a) informative thoughts on when might be the best time to try for a family (assuming I have the choice) in the midst of the nursing madness, and b) the facts on whether or not maternity leave during ICU experience would break my KPSA one-year full time minimum experience requirement for NA school. I appreciate any informative words on this matter, and any other suggestions might I consider to best prepare for NA school. Thank you!
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  3. 6 Comments so far...

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    I think there are a couple of things it depends on. One of the being the pregnancy and if there are complications like having to go on bed rest. If everything goes fine and you are not out for a few months, but only a few weeks then it shouldn't really matter. Realistically they probably won't know how long you were out unless you told them. You also have the figure the time in between applying, interview, acceptance, and starting would make up the difference in any time you would miss with an uncomplicated pregnancy.
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    I feel for you. I'm graduating with my BSN May 2014 at 33. If all goes according to plan, I'll enter the CRNA program of my choice in June 2017 and graduate May 2020 at 39! (Keywords: if all goes according to plan lol)

    Where to fit a baby in?!? I've already got two, who would be 13 & 9 by the time we're thinking about another. Is that too far apart? I don't want to have one too close to CRNA school, I'd miss all their baby years.

    As far as experience goes, I would call your school(s) and find out their method of verifying employment. Maybe even ask them about 6 weeks off for maternity leave (best case scenario), and if that would effect eligibility. That way you know for sure, without a doubt.

    And if that's the case, look at the bright side, you gain an extra year of ICU experience while having extra time with your new baby
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    OP - they count total years together, not one year in a row. They wanted to know all my years combined although I had had a ton of ER in between. Yes they want one year recent, and yes you are right, more is better. so I would think about stretching to two, and have kids whenever you want. I know people with very young kids in programs, and with older (mine are older), and I even know a few who got preg during a program!

    only you can decide how much stress is too much. having kids is a whole 'nother ball game with worry and stress. late 30s or even 40s is not to old to kick out a baby or two. I shadowed with a few crna's who are in that age range and just having babies now.

    good luck
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    Quote from missnurse01
    OP - they count total years together, not one year in a row. They wanted to know all my years combined although I had had a ton of ER in between. Yes they want one year recent, and yes you are right, more is better. so I would think about stretching to two, and have kids whenever you want. I know people with very young kids in programs, and with older (mine are older), and I even know a few who got preg during a program!

    only you can decide how much stress is too much. having kids is a whole 'nother ball game with worry and stress. late 30s or even 40s is not to old to kick out a baby or two. I shadowed with a few crna's who are in that age range and just having babies now.

    good luck
    Thank you for your input. So to clarify... when you say 'they want one year recent', you mean when you're applying they want your current work in the ICU to have been continuous (uninterrupted) for at least one year (that time around)?

    Thanks again!
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    Quote from FutureCRNA?
    I feel for you. I'm graduating with my BSN May 2014 at 33. If all goes according to plan, I'll enter the CRNA program of my choice in June 2017 and graduate May 2020 at 39! (Keywords: if all goes according to plan lol)

    Where to fit a baby in?!? I've already got two, who would be 13 & 9 by the time we're thinking about another. Is that too far apart? I don't want to have one too close to CRNA school, I'd miss all their baby years.

    As far as experience goes, I would call your school(s) and find out their method of verifying employment. Maybe even ask them about 6 weeks off for maternity leave (best case scenario), and if that would effect eligibility. That way you know for sure, without a doubt.

    And if that's the case, look at the bright side, you gain an extra year of ICU experience while having extra time with your new baby
    It sounds like you're in the same boat!
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    Quote from SarihnDipity
    Thank you for your input. So to clarify... when you say 'they want one year recent', you mean when you're applying they want your current work in the ICU to have been continuous (uninterrupted) for at least one year (that time around)?

    Thanks again!

    you will have to call and ask. I think cumulative with time off for baby is one thing, leaving the unit to work in a non critical care area is another. beware many other applicants will have more than that, so you can apply when you can, and reapply when you need to. Call a school and ask them to clarify to you. But I do not think that you have to restart your clock after coming back from postpartum.

    good luck


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