What Degree do I need to teach??

  1. 0 Hi Everyone.

    Is anybody out there able to tll me what kind of education I need in order to teach, for example, clinical instructor (if I decided) or Nurse Educator. Do I need to have a Master's Degree in Education, or is it possible to have a Masters as an NP, Mgmt Degree, etc. I'm not sure the best route to go, since I'm not sure at this point what I want to do. I appreciate all your help. Thanks!!
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  3. Visit  TRAUMARN96 profile page

    About TRAUMARN96

    TRAUMARN96 has '10' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Emergency Dept, Cardiac Cath Lab'. From 'Long Island, NY'; 43 Years Old; Joined Aug '06; Posts: 26; Likes: 1.

    15 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Most programs require that you have at least a Master's, although some community colleges till use BSN-prepared people, esp. as clinical instructors. Many BSN programs prefer doctorally-prepared people, but often have a mix of Master's- and doctorally-prepared faculty.

    It doesn't have to be an MSN in education; schools try to have nursing faculty with a wide variety of clinical backgrounds -- advanced practice, management, informatics, etc -- and they often specifically want faculty with an advanced degree, certification and extensive clinical experience in the specific area they will be teaching. Actually, over the years I've been in and out of nursing education, I've run into only a few people who did have an MSN in nursing education -- most have a clinical/practice degree.

    My advice (for what it's worth ) would be to take the time to figure out what you really want to do before getting into a grad program -- don't just do it for the sake of doing it, and don't just get into whatever program is easiest or most convenient. Whatever graduate degree you pursue, you're going to put a lot of time, blood, sweat, tears, and $$$ into getting it -- it might as well be something that you really want.
  5. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Yes, you should have at least a Master's Degree to teach -- but a few schools allow the lowest level of clinical instructors to have a BSN.

    As far as what to major in, that depends on what you want to teach. Ideally, you would have a Master's Degree with a concentration that supports what you want to teach -- and work experience in that field. Coursework in Nursing Education (and the new certification in nursing education) would also be helpful -- but is not usually required -- though it may be required in the future.

    I know I may not have cleared things up for you with my response. But the truth is, there is no one right answer ... no one right degree. Ideally, someone teaching at the university level has both a graduate degree and work experience in the field they are teaching in addition to courses and experience that taught them how to be a teacher. However, few people have the perfect combination and schools tend to be willing to make a few compromises if the applicant is the best one available for the job.

    My suggestion is to decide what type of nursing you would like to specialize in and focus on that to begin with. Also try to get some teaching experience along the way -- perhaps along with taking a few nursing education classes as part of your Master's program. Then you will be well-rounded and well-prepared for any one of a number of career paths that might be available to you in the future.

    Good luck.

    llg
  6. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    0
    I agree with Elkpark. Decide BEFORE you get into a masters program. I did it kinda backward. Originally, when I wanted to go to grad school, I thought that I wanted to go into management, so I got an MSN in management and leadership. However, then, I realized I didn't like management. So...went back for a post-MSN clinical nurse specialist. I'm very happy with my decision. With an MSN I can teach. However, if I had an MS in education I couldn't.
  7. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Hahahahaha... I see that as I was typing, elkpark was posting almost the same response!

    I guess great minds think alike.

    llg
  8. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I agree with Elkpark. Decide BEFORE you get into a masters program. I did it kinda backward. Originally, when I wanted to go to grad school, I thought that I wanted to go into management, so I got an MSN in management and leadership. However, then, I realized I didn't like management. So...went back for a post-MSN clinical nurse specialist. I'm very happy with my decision. With an MSN I can teach. However, if I had an MS in education I couldn't.
    I also started out believing I wanted management, then switched to CNS. Fortunately, I changed my mind early in my MSN program and was able to flip-flop my major/minor. I started out as an Administration major with a Perinatal minor --- but graduated as a Perinatal major with an Administration minor. I also took some Nursing Education courses as electives, making me about as well-rounded as I could get.

    I have no regrets as I have been able to slip in and out of a variety of roles over the years. I'm not limited by having focused too narrowly at the Master's level.

    llg
  9. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Quote from llg
    Hahahahaha... I see that as I was typing, elkpark was posting almost the same response!

    I guess great minds think alike.

    llg
    LOL -- I'll take that as my compliment for the day. Back atcha, girlfriend!

    I, too, took an MSN in my clinical specialty (child psych CNS) but took the education courses offered by my program as electives. I have been able to move back and forth between clinical practice and nursing education as I choose.
  10. Visit  traumaRUs profile page
    0
    I had several education courses in my MSN also. I'm actually thinking about doing some part-time teaching as well.
  11. Visit  TRAUMARN96 profile page
    0
    You guys are the best! I only joined this forum a few days ago after stumbling across it accidentally. I am so glad I did. You all have some really great advice, and you can never hear too much of that. I'm open to hear any additional advice, but you are all helping me already. Thanks again!!
  12. Visit  TRAUMARN96 profile page
    0
    Any suggestions for getting over this public speaking fear that I have. I've been told I'm a really good teacher (which is usually one on one), but even though I have considered teaching I still have a fear of being the center of attention. Surprising to everybody I work with since I'm one of the most outspoken!! I've taken a public speaking class which didn't help at all.
    Last edit by TRAUMARN96 on Aug 6, '06
  13. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Here are a couple thoughts -- that I haven't really organized, so they are a bit random. I was shy as a child and still don't like speaking in front of large audiences, though I am OK in front of small ones.

    1. There are a lot of ways to teach without lecturing in front of a large group. Unit-level staff development instructor, school clinical instructor, on-line education come to mind. These are all educational roles that rarely (if ever) involve large group public speaker. Most of the time, you are simply "talking with" single individuals or small groups of less than 10 people. A lot of people overlook these roles -- when there are actually some pretty good opportunities out there for decent jobs. Also, a job such as a staff development job (or unit educator job) gives you a lot of opportunities to learn about teaching and practice with small groups of people who don't expect or want a lot of formal presentations. These jobs give you the opportunity to "ease into" teaching.

    2. If you are running small to medium-sized classes, include a lot of activities and application experiences as part of the class. Such learning opportunities are less formal and not as nerve-racking for the instructor as is the "stand behind the podium and give a formal lecture" approach. Limiting your formal lecturing to short 5 -15 minute sections will be appreciated by your audience, probably increase their learning, and be a less stressful for you.

    3. Prepare, prepare, prepare. The larger the audience, the more I have my presentation "written out." While I try to maintain a conversational style even with a large formal lecture, I do write it out in a lot more detail when I will be speaking toa larger group.

    4. Work up to it. Don't start with large audiences. Don't give a presentation in front of a large audience until you have presented on the same topic in front of a couple of small audiences. This will help you be comfortable with your presentation and give you the opportunity to "get the bugs out" of it.

    5. Practice whatever relaxation techniques work for you -- meditation, yoga, deep breathing, visualization, etc. Don't wait until just before the presentation to try these things for the first time. If you do them regularly all the time, it will make it easier for your mind to "switch into that relaxed mode" when you need to use the technique in the heat of the moment.

    6. Get a job in which you would be comfortable with the type of student you will be most likely to encounter. For example, I am more comfortable talking in a conversational style to people who already have some real-life experience as a nurse. I find it more difficult to communicate with the total beginner level student because they can't relate to my many years of experience and find it difficult to learn from case examples. So ... I have to "work a lot harder" to communicate with beginners to bring things down to their level. It's no accident that I will be teaching theory this fall in on online RN-BSN program. No formal lectures, online discussions, experienced nurses as students -- it all plays to my strengths and comfort -- just the opposite of giving a big formal lecture to beginners.

    On the other hand, some people feel more comfortable teaching real beginners -- because they feel a bit intimidated by students who may have more years of experience than they have -- and maybe already know a lot about the topic being taught.

    Figure out the type of student you would like to teach and what you would like to teach and head in that direction. Again, not all teaching roles are alike. Identify the teaching role that suits you best and start there.

    That's what I thought of off the top of my head. Perhaps others will add more ideas.

    llg
  14. Visit  TRAUMARN96 profile page
    0
    All that is 'just off the top of your head'. Geeeezzz!! You've got a lot going on up there in that head of yours. Thank you soooo much for all the useful info. How do people get jobs teaching online courses? Do you just apply online? What kind of requirements are there? Thanks again.
  15. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Quote from TRAUMARN96
    All that is 'just off the top of your head'. Geeeezzz!! You've got a lot going on up there in that head of yours. Thank you soooo much for all the useful info. How do people get jobs teaching online courses? Do you just apply online? What kind of requirements are there? Thanks again.
    Getting on online teaching assignment is pretty much like getting any job. You get the necessary credentials and experience ... and you apply for the job just like you would for any teaching job. Submit a vitae, interview, etc. A friend of mine who teaches at a local brick and mortar university told me that they were looking for some help teaching their online courses. She gave me the name of the person to call -- and I called to acquire about the opportunities. We set up an interview. I updated my resume ... and that was it. Because it is just a part time adjunct position, I did't have to go through the whole process of interviewing with the whole department, the Dean, etc. My application process was probably also sped up by the fact that I am a "known commodity" in the community and had already done the paperwork and gotten an adjunct clinical position with them because I work with their students in my hospital. I did that about 8 years ago.

    If it seems a little overwhelming ... just take it one step at a time.

    llg


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