Theory is going to kill me! - page 2

:uhoh21: Ok, not literally, but come on...how much theory do I really need? I do understand it's usefulness to a point, but it is just not something that I can really wrap my hands around, you know?... Read More

  1. by   gojags99
    Not really liking these responses, especially reading them right before I start a theory course. Doesn't seem to be many positive replies.
  2. by   SuesquatchRN
    I hate theory, although I'm undergrad. I want to know how much time medical students spend studying medical "theory" and how many times they are told they need to develop "critical thinking skills." I find it demeaning, actually.
    Last edit by SuesquatchRN on Jan 8, '07 : Reason: bizarre grammatical twists and turns
  3. by   zenman
    Quote from Suesquatch
    I hate theory, although I'm undergrad. I want to know how much time medical students spend studying medical "theory" and how many times they are told they need to develop "critical thinking skills." I find it demeaning, actually.
    Medical students are working on a clinical doctorate...not a "real" doctorate...according to some. They memorize a lot of facts and forget half of it. One wise-cracking medical school professor even stated that he didn't know if they were even remembering the correct 50% or even if they were teaching the students the correct info to begin with. You get a theory, you got something to work with.

    You know if you hate something but have to do it, go after it with a vengence. I've always hated to do push-ups so I really trained hard at them...till they were easy, even one-handed pushups! Now, it doesn't seem so much of a "hated" thing.
  4. by   newbiern2006
    I just finished a graduate theory class in December, and I had to write a concept analysis paper as part of it - aced it, too! Once I got to reading the different theorists' work, I realized that the practice theories are quite helpful, and I think they shoud be included in all basic level nursing courses, according to subject. As for the more abstract theorists, they're work is what leads to the development of the practice theories. Abstract yes, but necessary for the promotion of nursing as a profession, not just skilled labor.
  5. by   llg
    Quote from newbiern2006
    I just finished a graduate theory class in December, and I had to write a concept analysis paper as part of it - aced it, too! Once I got to reading the different theorists' work, I realized that the practice theories are quite helpful, and I think they shoud be included in all basic level nursing courses, according to subject. As for the more abstract theorists, they're work is what leads to the development of the practice theories. Abstract yes, but necessary for the promotion of nursing as a profession, not just skilled labor.
    I liked your post.

    As someone who has taught theory ... I like the topic and believe it to be important for nurses to be familiar with the major theories of their discipline. However, I remain appalled at the lack of quality textbooks available. I assume that means that there are a lot of bad theory classes out there and I feel sorry for those students. Every nurses deserves to have theory taught by someone who understands it and likes it -- and to have textbooks that promote the use of theory instead of making people hate it.
  6. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from newbiern2006
    Abstract yes, but necessary for the promotion of nursing as a profession, not just skilled labor.
    But does it do anything to actually promote better nursing?

    I don't believe so.
  7. by   llg
    Quote from Suesquatch
    But does it do anything to actually promote better nursing?

    I don't believe so.
    Almost all of the (RN to BSN) students in my class last fall were able to identify ways in which an understanding of theory helped their practice. For most, theory provided them with insight into the purposes, processes, and possibilities of nursing that they had not previously thought about.

    I guess a lot depends on well the course is taught. I'm sorry that your school did not provide you with a good theory class that taught you how to use theory to improve your practice.
  8. by   juan de la cruz
    I can barely recall how my theory class in undergrad went but like most MSN students in the NP tracks, I was dreading the thought of going through the 3 credit theory course. In the ACNP program I attended, the theory class was disguised under the course title "Responses and Experience in Health and Illness". The class, however, turned out to be interesting. I agree with llg that it matters how the program is presented by the professor.

    Actually, the professor wasn't the greatest at lecturing. However, she assigned each student to present a specific theory surrounding stress, coping, illness, and health maintenance during each day we had class. Some of the theories were not exclusive to nursing or weren't developed by nurses. It made for some interesting thought-provoking discussion among a group of students with a diverse RN background as well as varied career goals for CNS and NP specialization.

    I have to admit that a lot of the grand theories are too abstract. But the mid-range theories that stemmed from them made a lot of sense and have applications in nursing practice.

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