RN to MSN advice please

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    Been an RN (ASN) for 9 years, have a Bachelors in another area (ancient) and now want my RN to MSN. I'm too old school to do it all on line and I found a place around the corner that offers the bridge. Question: Where do I get my "professional Associate with a graduate degree who is able to assess my practice and potential for graduate study" letter of recommendation? Old managers? Old profs?...and

    ...Next Question: Should I go for "Community Clinical Nurse Specialist" or "Family Nurse Practitioner" Besides the FNP able to write scripts, what is the difference? Thanks!!
  2. Poll: Which would you choose?

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  4. 7 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    83 views and not one reply? interesting.
    aachavez likes this.
  6. 0
    Don't you hate when that happens...

    Sorry your not getting the info you asked for but I do wish you the best of luck in whatever you decide. I'm looking into following that path also and doing my research on it do if I get any info about the difference I'll make sure to post it here.

    Good luck to you again
  7. 0
    Quote from Nurse_RaRa
    Been an RN (ASN) for 9 years, have a Bachelors in another area (ancient) and now want my RN to MSN. I'm too old school to do it all on line and I found a place around the corner that offers the bridge. Question: Where do I get my "professional Associate with a graduate degree who is able to assess my practice and potential for graduate study" letter of recommendation? Old managers? Old profs?...and

    ...Next Question: Should I go for "Community Clinical Nurse Specialist" or "Family Nurse Practitioner" Besides the FNP able to write scripts, what is the difference? Thanks!!
    It's possible that not one person has all the answers you are looking for. You're asking a few questions, and your situation is a bit unique.

    Regarding your letter of recommendation, it needs to come from your boss. they may not want a letter from a process since its been a while that you are out of school. I would ask specifically if they require one. I did not need one when I went back for my masters, and it had been around the same timeframe for me.

    Regarding your track, I may not be the best to answer this question (my MS is in education), but I'll ask a few questions to maybe get you thinking:

    Where do you live? Are you in an area where there are a lot of hospitals, is there a lot of community opportunities? Are there a lot of NP jobs. Do people who graduate actually get work?

    Do you need to decide before you begin the program, or can you take any core classes that would suffice either degree? Is there someone in the school you can ask about the big differences? I would think that the number of clinical hours would be more for NP, if that is a consideration. I know FNP has more hours because you are dealing with adults and children.

    Judging by the name, I'm thinking you may be limiting yourself with the community CNS. if you wanted to work in the hospital, your expertise may not be as appreciated.

    And finally, what do you see yourself doing with an advanced degree?
  8. 0
    I agree with the previous poster regarding the recommendations. Also, do not let that one piece of the puzzle delay your goal - I'm sure the school would be willing to work with you to figure it out. Personally, I'd go for the NP though that depends on your particular career goals. I've met a few CNS's who wish they did the NP or ended up going back to school for the NP for what it's worth.
  9. 0
    Several things here. I returned to school after 33 years for my BSN and am now in a FNP program. My bridge letters of recommendations came from varied sources: I used a nurse manager I worked with for several years, a physician who I had an excellent professional relationship with, and a nurse who had just completed her bridge that I was working with.

    As to what field, once you enter your MSN program, the first series of classes are generic to all Advanced Practice Nurses. The CNS degree takes less time than the FNP degree, but the biggest difference is your autonomy. Good luck in your quest.
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    Sorry, I can't answer your questions either. I am trying to get accepted to a FNP program. When I did one of my applications, the LORs could be from previous supervisors. The supervisor did not need have to have an advanced degree. One application I did required, the LORs to be from 3 nurses with a MSN or DNP.

    I have a question, I hope you don't mind. Is it possible that a NP could be hired for a job that required a CNS, but a CNS could not be hired for a NP job?
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    Letters can come from any nurse manager, physician, Nurses educator, but schools really like letters from your previous teachers. You have been out of school for a while so the nurse educator might be easier for you. As far as advice on your direction; I would say that has to do primarily on what your goals are. I would rather do the CNS because there are a ton of job opporitunities that will not require you to work directly for a medical group, or a physician. Leadership positions, educator roles, and so many others open up with CNS. Plus you can get a job that you will not have to be at work on holidays, weekends, ETC. Go to work, do your job, go home. No dictation, no drama with insurance companies, reimburments, worrying about your patients.... did I miss anything??? For me I would do CNS, for you... Depends on your goals.The jobs are so different.


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