Question about MSN programs

  1. This is kind of a stupid question but I have to ask...

    What is the difference between direct entry into a MSN program and a regular entry?

    Also...

    Say for example, a RN who graduated with a BSN wanted to go back to school but wasn't sure exactly if NP or CRNA was the way to go. Could this person take classes at a school that would count toward NP or CRNA credits without officially being placed into a certain program? Classes as in "non-clinical"
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   catlady
    I think it would totally depend on what those courses were and whether they were comparable. I think most schools have some core courses that everybody takes and then you go into your specialization. I don't think too many programs are set up for people who are "just looking," but I could be wrong. Best bet is to ask directly the school in which you're interested.

    Direct entry MSN programs are for non-nurse baccalaureate holders. They have no nursing experience but want to go directly for an MSN. Regular entry is everybody else. Me, I'm doing a bridge program. I have to take extra credits because I don't have a nursing degree, although I have 21 years as an RN.
  4. by   MLprincesa
    :wink2: thank you for your reply!
  5. by   christvs
    Quote from MLprincesa
    This is kind of a stupid question but I have to ask...

    What is the difference between direct entry into a MSN program and a regular entry?

    Also...

    Say for example, a RN who graduated with a BSN wanted to go back to school but wasn't sure exactly if NP or CRNA was the way to go. Could this person take classes at a school that would count toward NP or CRNA credits without officially being placed into a certain program? Classes as in "non-clinical"

    At my grad school (in Mass) you can take up to 3 grad classes (pathophysiology, pharmacology, etc.) without being formally accepted into a program. But after you take 3 of them, you can't take anymore until you are accepted formally into a program. But I would imagine every school is different on that.
  6. by   traumaRUs
    Prior to going for a masters degree, it is best to have an idea what you want to do. You can get this from a couple of years of experience. Believe me, I went the MSN (management and leadership) route with 13 years of nursing experience. I got halfway through and realized that I wanted a clinical focus. SO....I ended up continuing in school for another year in order to get my clinical nurse specialist. Much better to have an idea what you want to do rather than hitting and missing.

    Good luck.
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from MLprincesa
    This is kind of a stupid question but I have to ask...

    What is the difference between direct entry into a MSN program and a regular entry?

    Also...

    Say for example, a RN who graduated with a BSN wanted to go back to school but wasn't sure exactly if NP or CRNA was the way to go. Could this person take classes at a school that would count toward NP or CRNA credits without officially being placed into a certain program? Classes as in "non-clinical"
    Hello,
    Since you are an RN you already have "entered" and do not need any entry programs to Nursing.

    Just the other day a University told me that I would not qualify for their post master's certificate program because I will not have a BSN, I didn't bother to share with her the irony, that she was basically saying that the equivalent that any BSN student wouldn't qualify for a program that requires an RN because they did not have their ADN first. Your entry to nursing degree is the one where you earn your RN.

    The MSN entry programs are raising the bar on the entry level to practice and I am ALL for it!!! My MSN is not a specialist, just as a BSN isn't specialist either, if I want that then I go for Post Master's certificates, which I intend to do, (multiples yet, not until I am building my clinical proficiency).

    Gen
    Last edit by Gennaver on Sep 11, '06
  8. by   traumaRUs
    Gennaver - because the entry level MSN is so new, many schools don't know quite how to deal with these students.
  9. by   Gennaver
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Gennaver - because the entry level MSN is so new, many schools don't know quite how to deal with these students.
    Hello,

    Yeah, I see now! I figure if the clerical staff is unaware then it is not a major concern.

    I've come across another link which tries to clarify what the MSN entry:

    http://www.minoritynurse.com/feature...05-24-05b.html

    as well as the link I shared earlier:

    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Publications/issues/Aug02.htm

    My flippant remark about raising the minimum degree of entry to MSN is not a serious thought, (just a knee jerk reaction to someone claiming Ivory tower prejudice...)

    Since replying yesterday I have seriously considered making this topic into my Master's thesis, (thus saving my area of research interest for my post MSN-which is just as well because I've been developing my main research interest for the greater part of ten years now!)

    I am grateful for constructive discussion about this TraumaRUs because that is the only way to maintain unconditional respect for all of our nursing colleagues.

    Last night I spoke with my research professor about this and I am eager to spend the next 9 months working on this to attempt to dispel myths and to facilitate understanding and mutual respect.

    As always, nice to read you,
    Gen

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