PhD student who is also a New Grad! So Confused! - pg.3 | allnurses

PhD student who is also a New Grad! So Confused! - page 3

Hello All, I am recently finishing up a Entry Level Masters Program and graduating in a few weeks and will be taking the NCLEX really soon. I was very excited to get out there and work, however I... Read More

  1. Visit  Hello123456 profile page
    #26 0
    I have a similar experience (PhD while working with the help of tuition/fees/benefits covered by the university).

    I 100% advocate for getting the nursing experience in psych (working part-time/per-diem) while working on your PhD. I did it and it was not a struggle at all.

    The only issues I had were the nursing school administrators' negative perception of working while getting a PhD. IGNORE THEM! I assume that none of them have the personal experience working while getting a PhD, so they have no credibility on the matter.

    You will have so much opportunity/marketability when you graduate with a PhD, have specialized clinical experience (unmet needs in psych and gero are growing rapidly), and being under 30 years old will give you a huge advantage.

    Good luck!
    Last edit by Hello123456 on Sep 5, '15 : Reason: grammar errors
  2. Visit  elkpark profile page
    #27 1
    Quote from Hello123456
    I have a similar experience (PhD while working with the help of tuition/fees/benefits covered by the university).

    I 100% advocate for getting the nursing experience in psych (working part-time/per-diem) while working on your PhD. I did it and it was not a struggle at all.

    The only issues I had were the nursing school administrators' negative perception of working while getting a PhD. IGNORE THEM! I assume that none of them have the personal experience working while getting a PhD, so they have no credibility on the matter.
    Why on earth would you assume that? I've been in nursing a few decades now, have taught in a few different programs, and every doctorally-prepared nurse I have known personally was an experienced RN who continued working through her/his doctoral program. I'm sure there are nurses out there who didn't work while in their doctoral programs, but you certainly can't assume that that is the norm.
  3. Visit  ParkerBC,MSN,RN profile page
    #28 2
    Quote from HouTx
    Okey dokey - one more time.

    ELM graduates are at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to hiring. They are just as un-qualified as all other RN new grads, but have much higher expectations. Hiring managers actively avoid new grads that feel that they are "entitled" to special treatment. ELM does not have any confer any additional value in terms of clinical ability or other value for an entry level job. In my part of the country, new grad hiring preference is: 1) generic BSN, 2) ADN, 3) ABSN, 4) ELM.... So, considering the glut of BSN new grads, the chances of getting an acute care job are very slim for ELMS.

    Having done the educational 'thing' myself, I can't even imagine pursuing a PhD in nursing without any clinical experience. A likely outcome would be becoming unemployable with huge student loans.

    I must respectfully disagree with this. I have been hired for each position to which I applied. While I agree the playing field is level clinically, an ABSN or ELM graduate brings maturity, time management, soft skills, ability to relate to patients from personal experiences, and interdisciplinary (interdepartmental) team work experience to name a few. I would much rather have a 40 year old new grad ABSN nurse over a 22 year new grad BSN nurse without any or very limited work experience.

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