Any MEPNs having 2nd thoughts?

  1. Hi all:

    I've been lurking for a while...Here's my story. Accepted to UCSF MEPN program after over a year of hard work to get there, now I find myself having 2nd thoughts. I'm not sure I'm ready for 3 more years of hard work, more debt, and all I read is ofnurses being exremely unhappy in their work, ground down by MDs, unflexible schedules, hospital politics, and unfriendliness on the wards where they work.

    Anyone else having 2nd thoughts?
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   arciedee
    Have you already started the program? I'm two months into a direct-entry program. I think my situation is a little different from yours as my program is a generalist program and only lasts two years in total with us being able to sit for the NCLEX and take a job after May of next year (the program goes part-time after that, but it's accelerated prior to then). But yeah, there have been moments when I've flirted with the idea of dropping out... mostly due to money or when I have a paper looming that I really don't feel like writing. But I've never seriously thought about it because honestly this is so much more fun than my former career. My classmates and I are all in this together and that makes it easier, and I know that the loans make things tight for now, but in a little over a year I'll be able to start paying them off.

    Second thoughts are normal. Don't let the hearsay turn you away, though. There are cons to every profession, but there are a lot of pros, too. However, if your heart really isn't into it, then it's okay to change your mind. I had applied to a graduate program in a different field a few years ago and realized after I was accepted that it wasn't really what I wanted to do. I'm glad I didn't do that and went for nursing even though it was a much bigger and scarier step.
  4. by   BerkeleyMom
    I was in a somewhat similar situation, but different school and more expensive. I had my doubts before I was accepted--but more a fear of debt. My friend said something that resonated with me in regards to my doubts. She said that if you go into it and realize it is not right, you can always change your mind. People do drop out of graduate programs when they discover it was not right for them. At least you will know that it was the wrong choice. However, if you never try it, you may at some point regret it or wonder what things would be like if you had done it.

    What will you do at that point? Sure you can change your mind again and reapply, but as you know getting into UCSF as a direct entry student is a challenge in itself.

    I am not saying you should just jump into it with doubts--I don't even know you. But, I do think it is normal to have these concerns before making such a big life-changing decision.

    Can you think about where you see yourself after you have graduated? And then in another 5 or 10 years? Can you create a different picture without the nursing degree? If this program is going to lead you to your dreams then all of the other stressers and beaurocratic bull$#@! will work itself out.

    I think I will just jump in with eyes wide open but know that nothing is permanent. Best of luck in your decision making!
  5. by   mvanz9999
    Yes, daily. I have applied (and been accepted to) direct entry programs. I have the same concerns that you do. However, in regards to working conditions, I often find that things aren't nearly as bad as people say. For me.

    The money is a huge, huge, huge issue, and if I decide not to go, that will be the reason.
  6. by   NPs4health
    Hi! I am a new nurse, just graduated with my Bachelor's and working on the floor. Not enjoying it all that much and really do think I'd rather be in school than doing floor nursing. So I really envy where you all are right now and wanted to say don't give up cause you're almost there! At least you're in the program, I am having to work a year and then apply somewhere and hope to be accepted. Anyway best of luck to you! Don't give up, bedside nursing stinks!
  7. by   Kensington
    Quote from gotnurse333
    Hi! I am a new nurse, just graduated with my Bachelor's and working on the floor. Not enjoying it all that much and really do think I'd rather be in school than doing floor nursing. So I really envy where you all are right now and wanted to say don't give up cause you're almost there! At least you're in the program, I am having to work a year and then apply somewhere and hope to be accepted. Anyway best of luck to you! Don't give up, bedside nursing stinks!
    That's really too bad! I'd be interested in hearing why you think it stinks?
  8. by   bostongal
    Hi,

    Just wanted to advise you to stick with your original decision. A little later on (say at the end of your mere 12 months), you'll be so glad you did. I am a current MEPN, graduating from this first year in June 2007. It's been a long haul, but I'm proud of the amount I've learned and accomplished in this year. And don't forget, it's possible to take a "step-out year" in which you take a break between the MEPN and graduate school years to work full-time as an RN.
  9. by   wildmountainchild
    Stick it out, you'll regret it if you don't. I'm in an accelerated program myself and I'm loving it. I even like floor nursing. I'm learning soooooo much. My patients have really touched me, and I hope I've left an impression on them as well.

    I joined the California Association of Nurse Practitioners as a student member and went to thier annual conference at the beginning of April....it did wonders for my motivation. It reminded me of where all my hard work is taking me, I also met boat fulls of people who love ther jobs...very inspiring.

    Sometimes I miss "life", but I'm trading this time so that I can contribute to the greater good in a more profound manner than was possible before. It's so worth it. Hang in there, tough it out, and it will be over before you know it!
  10. by   dg05
    Kaibey,

    Thanks for posting this -- I'm having second thoughts, too and it's almost all because of the debt aspect. The money part feels overwhelming. However, I think wildmountainchild is right -- I'm doing this because I want to contribute to the greater good and I hope to volunteer with organizations working in refugee camps, with immigrants, and in disaster areas. I know that I won't be able to achieve that feeling of usefulness in my current career and every time I think about not going to nursing school I remember how helpless I felt after Hurricane Katrina and the tsunami in asia and how badly I just wanted to do something. For me, nursing is the way to do that...

    Good luck and let us know what you decide.

    dg
  11. by   kaibey
    I really appreciate all the comments from all of you. It took some courage for me to finally admit to this, and I felt bad posting on the forum after so many people were dsappointed not to be admitted.

    I've decided, thanks to many of the comments above, to stick with it, and have even given notice at work so there's no backing out now. Sure, it'll be hard work, but I think I'm up for it, and even getting a little excited about starting.

    I hope to meet some of you in June when the program starts. And thanks again...

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