Accepted Columbia ETP applicants (and current students: some advice). get-together? - page 4

:welcome: Hi everyone! I thought it might be a good idea to get our own separate thread for those accepted to Columbia ETP! Sure we have a lot to discuss! I would also like to invite current... Read More

  1. by   lizcakes
    hi all! i was also accepted to columbia for the FNP specialty! i've been reading these forums for awhile, but this is my first post i'm excited/nervous at the same time. i'm still waiting on ucla but columbia is very enticing! is anyone else out there coming from the west coast? i'm a little nervous bc i'm from CA and it would be a huge move. i think columbia has such a good program bc there are very few programs (to my knowledge) that you can get an NP in 2.5 years! anyway, congrats to everyone who has been accepted and thanks for the words of wisdom from the current ETP-ers!
  2. by   iriska_meller
    hi guys! Just got a reply from Ms Wolfe, the admission lady, about the CPR. She says that is required, and it DOES NOT MATTER where you got your certificate, as long as you got the actual paper.
  3. by   fluffhead
    Re: cpr
    The benefit of using the American Heart Association is that the cert for a Healthcare Provider lasts 2 years while I believe Red Cross expires after one year. If you are in the Bay Area of Ca., the Paramedics Assoc. is a great place to get 'er done.
  4. by   Asherah
    Not to hijack the thread but to all of you future Columbia ETPers that are using any form of financial aid: Do you have to submit your letter of intent before you find out what kind of aid you receive? I'm considering Columbia for 2008 applications (If I can't get into a program this year) and this question is looming over my head....so much $$$!
  5. by   meagain716
    Is anyone else terrified about the possibility of moving to NYC?? I grew up in Wisconsin and have been living in Minneapolis for the past 2 years. I'm a midwest girl, and I don't know if I'll be able to handle the harsh realities of NYC. Yikes!
  6. by   cmelny
    I moved to NYC three years ago and think it's great! It can be overwhelming at first, and Columbia's not in the BEST part of town, but NYC has so much to offer. I think anyone can get used to life here.

    By the way, I contacted Judy Wolfe with some questions. It seems that we will be receiving some more mail next week regarding the CPR and etc.
  7. by   anniepants
    i'm a midwest girl, too (born and raised in oklahoma), and i've been living in nyc for the past 2 years.

    yes, it IS harsh here. everyone's always rushing around doing their own thing. nobody says hello to you on the street or in the market like they do in the midwest. some people will be rude to you. HOWEVER, if you can see past this stuff and get over it, its an AMAZING city. there's just sooo much diversity in one area, and there are so many different things to do. you can experience so much here, and we've got some of the best hospitals in the nation (which is a huge plus for us in terms of clinical rotations!). i really do love it here, and plan on settling down here for a long time to come...
  8. by   lizcakes
    oh yes, i'm freaked about perhaps moving to NYC. i've visited there once and loved it, but to live and school there? yikes! i'm from southern CA so i have a feel for the city life, but it's still a big move. NYC does have so much diversity and a good health care network which makes for amazing experiences!
  9. by   cozzy66
    Native NYer here... I've heard so much about people freaking out when they move to the city, but I think it's something you'll get used to eventually. If you don't mind being anonymous and shoved a bit on the subway, you'll be fine. You need to have an excellent pedestrian navigation/shoving system
    I had a roommate who moved to NY from northern CA and took some time to acclimate, but is fine now, but has decided that NY is not for her for more than a few years. Maybe you'll find it to be different.
    Also, interacting with people who actually say hello on the street to random people has freaked me out
  10. by   sherlee
    Quote from Asherah
    Not to hijack the thread but to all of you future Columbia ETPers that are using any form of financial aid: Do you have to submit your letter of intent before you find out what kind of aid you receive? I'm considering Columbia for 2008 applications (If I can't get into a program this year) and this question is looming over my head....so much $$$!
    I have the same question. But isn't fafsa due March 2nd? So I'm guessing we won't know about our financial aide package until much afterwards. Columbia will tell us about financial aide and costs on Visiting Day if you go.

    I've been trying to estimate how much tuition would cost. The problem is: I don't know approximately how many units of clinical courses do we need to take for the MS portion. Anyone have a clue? (I'm accepted in the FNP program)
    Last edit by sherlee on Feb 8, '07
  11. by   fluffhead
    Hmm - I'm native to Denver, but lived some'teen years in Cali, all over the Los Angeles basin and then 6 yrs in Berkeley. There are many Ca transplants in the ETP program, and we have some small town girls - central MA, VT, a guy from Houston - nobody has gone home with their tail between their legs to my knowledge.

    When my Supershuttle dropped me off in front of the dorms, the first thing I saw was a big fat rat that could probably ingest a chihuahua. And that was in broad daylight in the hot May sun. Lovely. None indoors (yet), thankfully.

    People are cool, if standoffish. Hard to get used to the direct-ness, especially after being used to the flakey "let's do lunch" los angeleno nice you to death approach...but it's refreshing.

    There are security/escort services around Columbia Presby campus, and that is in response to the muggings - this isn't Mean Streets and thankfully the '80s are a distant memory, but there is crime in Washington Heights.:smiley_ab

    Still, it's great. Everyone should get such a chance to check it out! It will make you a great nurse practitioner to interact with the people of NYC.
  12. by   meagain716
    this is a question for the current ETPers:
    exactly how hard is it? I went to a fairly prestigious school for undergrad, and did fairly well, though I struggled when it came to memorization (specifically A&P). So, are we talking med school hard?

    I'm starting to get nervous, and I don't want to go and not be able to handle it. How do you all perceive it? How ridiculously difficult is it? I mean, what GPA did you all have going into the program? Were you pre-med? Am I already behind?

    I'm currently taking A/PII, and I'm studying harder than I normally would because I'm nervous of not making it in grad school.

    Also, I'm really worried about housing. Where should I look? What are good neighborhoods around Columbia? I don't know NY at all! Any advice you could give would be greatly appreciated.
  13. by   HYPEractiveTTU
    Quote from fluffhead
    There are many Ca transplants in the ETP program...
    Many? you mean more than half of the class right? lol

    Quote from fluffhead
    and we have some small town girls - central MA, VT, a guy from Houston - nobody has gone home with their tail between their legs to my knowledge.
    Thanks for grouping me in with the "small town" folks! I forgot how Houston is only the 4th largest city in the nation... is it even on a map? :trout:

    Quote from fluffhead
    When my Supershuttle dropped me off in front of the dorms, the first thing I saw was a big fat rat that could probably ingest a chihuahua.
    have you ever thought about being a recruiter?

    Quote from fluffhead
    Everyone should get such a chance to check it out! It will make you a great nurse practitioner to interact with the people of NYC.
    yup... NYC is an education all in it's own.

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