Thomas Jefferson FACT Program - page 2

Hi. I have been accepted into the TJU FACT program that begins in May but the orientation isn't until a week before classes begin and I would like to get a better idea of the scheduling. I know... Read More

  1. by   JerseyGir1
    Thanks Fil and Jello... That info really helped!! I'm sure I'll refer back to it when I start as well. I'm very excited about the program. Good luck finishing up! Either of you going on to the Masters?
  2. by   bailey728
    Fil149 and Jello18966- Thanks for describing your experience of the FACT program. It was really helpful. I'm also starting the program this May and am always interested when people talk about the program because it's been hard to find a lot of detailed info on it.

    I was curious about the clinical placements. If I'm remembering correctly what I've heard before, you usually have clinicals at a few different hospitals per semester. Is that right? Do your clinical days each week stay the same or do they rotate (e.g. if you start out with Sunday and Monday for clinical days, does that stay the same throughout the whole semester or while you're at a given hospital)? Do you get to choose 2-12s or 3-8s, or is that decided for you?

    Thanks again for any info you can give. I'm glad to hear you like the program - makes me excited to get started.
  3. by   fil149
    Glad the info helped. About clinical placements, for the summer quarter you start clinicals about a month in and it lasts 8 weeks (this is your longest rotation). The faculty usually gives you a sign up sheet for clinical placement where you can list your top 3 choices. They will try to accomodate your top three the best they can. For our summer rotation all clinical placements were af Jeff, not sure if they will do this again this year but that's how it worked for us. As Jello mentioned, after the first month you will have classes on Th and Friday for about 8 hours and clinical days can be picked M-W or Sat and Sun. I had MT for 12 hours each day and yes the schedule remains constant until the particular rotation is over.

    I agree with Jello the first semester for myself was also the most difficult so far. But I have found things getting easier because you learn how to manage your time and learn the best ways to study for the exams. After the first semester you clinicals will vary from can go as short as 2 weeks to 5 weeks long. Second semester the rotation is as follows:
    Telemetry: about 4 weeks
    Maternity: About 3 weeks
    Third Semester
    Peds: About 5 clinical days on unit and 2 days in school like setting.
    Neuro: 4 clinical days
    Psych: 5 clinical days

    We are about to finish up our third semester :rckn:. After that you will have community rotation and a critical care rotation. Once again good luck to all in the program. I agree with Jello don't stress out just stay focused.
    Last edit by fil149 on Feb 5, '08
  4. by   bailey728
    Thanks so much! I appreciate the info. That is exactly what I was looking for. Good luck with the rest of the program.
  5. by   AtomicWoman
    I'm reviving this thread to see if any of you helpful people who posted know the answer to this question: can you choose to do 2-12s for clinicals, or is it out of your hands whether you do 2-12s or 3-8s? This actually is pretty important to my thinking right now.

    Thanks so very much to everyone.
  6. by   sunshine88
    You usually get the opportunity to chose 2-12's or 3-8s, however your not guaranteed your choice. However, if you have a good reason like kids, etc. sometimes they will take that into account. You have the opportunity to switch with people too.
  7. by   bailey728
    I'm in the FACT program now. Just wanted to add to what sunshine wrote. At the beginning of a clinical rotation, you are given a sheet with all of the different rotation units/times/days and asked to give your top three choices. The 8 hour rotations are M/T/W from 7a-3p or M/T/W from 2p-10p. The 12 hour rotations are from 7a-7p on either Sa/Su, Su/M, M/T, or T/W. Classes are all day Thursdays and Fridays. As sunshine said, you are not guaranteed one of your top three choices but if you have a specific reason for needing a certain day/time slot, they do take that into consideration. FYI- they require you to do at least one weekend rotation during the program; this would be either a Sa/Su or Su/M rotation.
  8. by   sunshine88
    By the way, they don't keep track of who signs up for weekends so you don't have to have a weekend clinical. They just say that to people in the beginning but I know they don't follow what they state as far as having to have at least one weekend clinical. I actually preferred the weekends but I know people who didn't have one weekend at all.
  9. by   AtomicWoman
    Quote from bailey728
    I'm in the FACT program now. Just wanted to add to what sunshine wrote. At the beginning of a clinical rotation, you are given a sheet with all of the different rotation units/times/days and asked to give your top three choices. The 8 hour rotations are M/T/W from 7a-3p or M/T/W from 2p-10p. The 12 hour rotations are from 7a-7p on either Sa/Su, Su/M, M/T, or T/W. Classes are all day Thursdays and Fridays. As sunshine said, you are not guaranteed one of your top three choices but if you have a specific reason for needing a certain day/time slot, they do take that into consideration. FYI- they require you to do at least one weekend rotation during the program; this would be either a Sa/Su or Su/M rotation.
    How are you finding the program? I know you just started at the end of May. Does it seem overwhelming? Do you have kids/spouse/family?
  10. by   bailey728
    Thanks for the info sunshine. I didn't realize they don't keep track. They made such a big deal out of the weekend thing I figured they would stick us with one sooner or later.

    AtomicWoman,

    Regarding the program, I am very happy with it. I'm glad I chose Jeff and think it is as solid an education as you can get in an accelerated program. The faculty are great, I feel supported, and the material is interesting and always changing. The thing that I personally have liked the best is that they really try to give you a little taste of everything and try to make it interesting. Since this is the kind of info I searched for on the program and couldn't find, I'll give you some concrete examples... we had a PT come to give a guest lecture on positioning/body mechanics (and then had to position each other in hospital beds and do things like go up and down stairs on crutches to see what it's like for patients); we've had numerous seminars in clinical on things like drains/wound care/body casting (this depends on your clinical instructor); we are encouraged to view an autopsy if we choose; we had to attend a patient support group to see the psychosocial side of things; we use SimMan models for things like listening to lung sounds, heart sounds, murmurs, etc. We've been told when we get to critical care, they use the SimMan / SimWoman models to simulate code situations.

    Some people have been less than thrilled with some of the disorganization, but I was expecting this to some extent in an accelerated program. I just go with the flow and things have been fine. I don't think the program is overwhelming overall but at times it can be. I have a husband, no kids. Some of the people in our program with kids seem like they're struggling; others are fine. Same is true for people with no kids, and/or no spouse/partner. I think it comes down to time management and prioritization skills and accepting that you'll never be able to do all of the readings (which is okay). Some of us are able to work part-time outside of school but I have not found the time to do this. I agree with previous posters that the first month or so was the hardest (TONS of reading and lab time). I've felt in the past few weeks that we've all settled in and think the rest of the year will be fine. Absolutely doable. I realize I'm only nearing the end of the first quarter, but if you have any specific questions I can try to answer them for you.
  11. by   AtomicWoman
    Quote from bailey728
    AtomicWoman,

    Regarding the program, I am very happy with it. I'm glad I chose Jeff and think it is as solid an education as you can get in an accelerated program. The faculty are great, I feel supported, and the material is interesting and always changing. The thing that I personally have liked the best is that they really try to give you a little taste of everything and try to make it interesting. Since this is the kind of info I searched for on the program and couldn't find, I'll give you some concrete examples... we had a PT come to give a guest lecture on positioning/body mechanics (and then had to position each other in hospital beds and do things like go up and down stairs on crutches to see what it's like for patients); we've had numerous seminars in clinical on things like drains/wound care/body casting (this depends on your clinical instructor); we are encouraged to view an autopsy if we choose; we had to attend a patient support group to see the psychosocial side of things; we use SimMan models for things like listening to lung sounds, heart sounds, murmurs, etc. We've been told when we get to critical care, they use the SimMan / SimWoman models to simulate code situations.

    Some people have been less than thrilled with some of the disorganization, but I was expecting this to some extent in an accelerated program. I just go with the flow and things have been fine. I don't think the program is overwhelming overall but at times it can be. I have a husband, no kids. Some of the people in our program with kids seem like they're struggling; others are fine. Same is true for people with no kids, and/or no spouse/partner. I think it comes down to time management and prioritization skills and accepting that you'll never be able to do all of the readings (which is okay). Some of us are able to work part-time outside of school but I have not found the time to do this. I agree with previous posters that the first month or so was the hardest (TONS of reading and lab time). I've felt in the past few weeks that we've all settled in and think the rest of the year will be fine. Absolutely doable. I realize I'm only nearing the end of the first quarter, but if you have any specific questions I can try to answer them for you.
    Thank you so much for all that detail! A couple of questions: how many hours per day or week do you study? Do you have 2 clinicals/week or 3? How long a commute do you have? (I'm in S. Jersey.) Have you had any exams yet, and are they do-able?

    Thank you again!!
  12. by   bailey728
    Hi again,

    I currently have three 8-hour clinicals per week. I'm really going to try to get two 12s next quarter because I feel like I have less time than people who have 2/week. I'm on the 7-3 M/T/W rotation. We usually get out a little late, so by the time I get home, I'm tired and don't want to study much. In contrast, the people with two 12s will sometimes (not always) get done early and then they also have a whole extra day to themselves.

    I live in West Phila and ride my bike so I have about a 20 min commute. Tons of people in our program from south jersey. Most take patco in. Some come from very far; I know of at least 2-3 people with an hour+ commute each way.

    How much I study/read depends on the week. Most weekdays I'd estimate about 3 hours/day and on weekends probably about 4-6 hours/day. Some weekends I won't do one thing because I need a mental break (that was this past weekend). The instructors will tell you it's healthy to do that every now and then. I could have justified it fine all by myself, but that's good too.

    I had thought most of my time would be spent straight studying, but we actually have a fair amount of smaller projects that take up time. My estimate of how long I spend studying includes these. (For example, we had to write a report on the support group experience, a report on the day we spent in the OR, care plans for clinical, etc.) Right now we have 5 classes. The three main classes are pharm 1, patho 1 and nursing management 1. These are taught by body system, so that in a given week you might do GI and cover GI drugs, GI path and GI nursing care. The other 2 classes are Health Assessment (this class has a lab) and Intro to Nursing (some busy work, laid back, not a lot of effort). I checked the schedule for our next quarter and it seems like the work load is a lot less.

    We've had exams in all of our classes except Intro (no exams for that class). They structure exams like the NCLEX exam (including style of question and amount of time given to answer each question) so we're used to them by the time we graduate. I thought the exams were fine and easier than I studied for. They try to prepare you by guiding your readings with questions to focus on, and giving you NCLEX style questions in lecture to try to answer. The core courses (pharm, patho, management) are tested at the same time (i.e. you have all 3 exams back to back on one day). Makes sense since they teach them together. The Health Assessment exam was written, but they also have a practical exam at the end where you show up, they give you a body system, and you have to do an assessment on a classmate. They told us exactly what they were expecting though, so it's not too bad, just practice.

    Well, I guess I've rambled on long enough. Sorry this is so long. I just remember what it was like when I was considering the program and I wanted as much info as I could find. So I thought I would share as much as I could in case it helps someone else. Any other questions, ask away.
    Last edit by bailey728 on Jul 22, '08 : Reason: spelling
  13. by   apoptotic
    Thanks for the great info for the people who are applying...I was wondering if you could message me (or just reply here) the titles of your Pharm, Path, and Nursing Management books for this term? I have a ton of nursing books from various people, and I was just curious as to whether or not I already own them or not thanks!

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