Is anyone currently in RACC's Nursing Program, and also in the night groups?

  1. 0
    I am hoping to find out any information I can on RACC's nursing program from students currently in it, and also from anyone in the night groups. That is what I plan on doing. Thanks all!!
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    i was in raccs program for one semester, and changed schools. it is a really tough program, but everyone i know thats graduated said they feel more prepared than some of the other graduates from the area. our first semester started with 90 students and 45 failed/dropped.

    as for the night program, i do know back when i was in (2009), they only had 20 slots for nights as opposed to 60 for days, so it is hard to get into. you have to have a good reason for wanting nights and apply as early as possible with the best grades you can to have a good chance at getting in the night program.. i do know a couple people who did days the first semester and switched to nights the second semester after people failed/dropped out and there were slots open, but they still had to present to the dean a very good reason why they needed nights.
  5. 0
    Thank you so much for responding. Why did you end up switching schools, and which one did you switch to? I heard the program is very hard. I can't believe half the class failed or dropped out. What is it that makes it so hard, if you don't mind me asking? Well I am hoping when it is time that I am one of the first appointments to pick a group and I get the night slot. If not I am sure I could figure things out to go during the day.

    Again, I appreciate the info. It helped me understand how the night/days work.
  6. 1
    Hello! I am currently in my 3rd semester of clinicals at RACC. 1 week left! I agree with the previous poster who said that it is a very tough program - it is. But it is also doable! My class started with 92 students and we are down to 42. So we do lose a lot. For many reasons - poor test takers, don't study enough, overwhelmed, etc... You really have to be focused and prioritize your time. It isn't meant to be an easy program. When you graduate, they want you prepared to take your boards and pass! They need >80% NCLEX success rate to maintain accredidation! It wouldn't be fair to let people slide through that wouldn't be able to pass the NCLEX! That said, it probably don't have to be quite as hard as it is. But, it is a good program. You need to be prepared for studying - A LOT! Focus on your notes for exams and make sure you understand concepts - not just facts. All the information you learn is cummulative and builds on itself. If you don't get it right away - you have little chance of making it to the end! I think that right now, the majority of the instructors are very good and fair. I have truly enjoyed all of my clinical experiences thus far and my instructors.

    As for the night program, I am currently in this! I LOVE IT!! I did a semester of days and two semesters of nights and I like nights sooooo much better! I feel we have better ratios as far as staff to student and we also get more practice time because there are not so many of us waiting to do things in Lab, etc... It is M-TH. First semester and second semester you will have (apprx) Lecture M 5-9, Lab T 5-8 and clinicals W and Th (2:30-9:30/10:30). Third semester you have clinicals M & T (up till 11pm) and Lecture W, Lab Th. First semester you do 5wks long term care, 10 wks or so of Med-Surg. Second is mostly Med-Surg with an OR observation. Third you do apprx 8 wks Med-Surg, 3 wks Psych, and 3 wks Maternity. Next semester is mostly ICU I believe. We go the first 8 wks pretty much the same as we do now. The last 6 wks though you have clinical 3 days a week (8hrs each) with 3 wks Evenings and 3 wks Days. You may be bounced around as far as facilities too. Also, you have btwn 2-4 patients the last 6 wks whereas previously you only had 1. You could be moved to days or vice-versa to fill available spaces - whether you choose or not.

    You really need to be prepared at all times. If you don't know an answer - "I don't know, but I'm looking it up right now." Keep your skills fresh. Whatever you learn in Lab you are expected to know in clinical - whether you have done it previously on a person or manequin(sp?). Start practicing NCLEX questions early - like study specific sections that pertain to areas being tested. Great review as well as prep for boards.

    Good luck! RACC gets a bad rep because there is such a low pass rate - but those who pass are well prepared! It is a very good education for the price!
    ashleyisawesome likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from HollyJ
    Thank you so much for responding. Why did you end up switching schools, and which one did you switch to? I heard the program is very hard. I can't believe half the class failed or dropped out. What is it that makes it so hard, if you don't mind me asking? Well I am hoping when it is time that I am one of the first appointments to pick a group and I get the night slot. If not I am sure I could figure things out to go during the day.

    Again, I appreciate the info. It helped me understand how the night/days work.

    my reason for leaving was not the typical "i couldnt pass the tests". honestly the tests werent so bad if you know how to critically think. unfortunately some people just cant, and cant get into the groove of being able to figure out NCLEX style questions. that is why a majority of people failed out. i however had a whack job for a clinical instructor who failed me in clinical, so even though i got a B as a grade, it was turned into an F. she had no significant reasons to fail me, and the staff there was less than willing to discuss anything with me. i went to the dean of nursing crying and she told me to get over it, threw a tissue at me and told me to leave when im done and walked out. when i inquired about readmission, they said i could get back in MAYBE fall 2012, but more than likely fall 2013. so i would not have even started yet. the attitudes of the staff just left a bad taste in my mouth so i decided to look elsewhere.

    im happy to say i applied to St. Lukes in Bethlehem ( a bit more of a drive, but worth it), and was one of 60 who got in out of 400 applicants. im now more than halfway through the program and have not had any issues. the course work is in no way easier, same question format, same material covered. but we get more clinical time, and since they are associated with the hospital we get first pick of clinical site and preceptorships. they also have an above 90% first time NCLEX passrate, and are known to hire ~80% of their graduates. i feel like the staff is much more friendly, supportive, and actually wants everyone to succeed. they intervene when they see someone is in trouble and give them one on one tutoring, coaching, etc. whereas at RACC it was just kind of sink or swim and i got the feeling they were deliberately weeding people out in the beginning.

    dont get me wrong. i am in no way trying to sway you into going or not going to particular school, just giving you my reasons on switching. truth be told, i probably would have braved the storm and went back to RACC if they offered me a seat in 2010. its cheaper, and closer. if you do end up going, just have the mindset of "do whatever my clinical instructor wants me to." kiss her ass, dont question things she says, even if it seems wrong. just try your hardest to impress them and be the best nursing student you can be.

    i wish you luck wherever you go, nursing school is very hard regardless.
  8. 0
    Quote from alovesjos
    Hello! I am currently in my 3rd semester of clinicals at RACC. 1 week left! I agree with the previous poster who said that it is a very tough program - it is. But it is also doable! My class started with 92 students and we are down to 42. So we do lose a lot. For many reasons - poor test takers, don't study enough, overwhelmed, etc... You really have to be focused and prioritize your time. It isn't meant to be an easy program. When you graduate, they want you prepared to take your boards and pass! They need >80% NCLEX success rate to maintain accredidation! It wouldn't be fair to let people slide through that wouldn't be able to pass the NCLEX! That said, it probably don't have to be quite as hard as it is. But, it is a good program. You need to be prepared for studying - A LOT! Focus on your notes for exams and make sure you understand concepts - not just facts. All the information you learn is cummulative and builds on itself. If you don't get it right away - you have little chance of making it to the end! I think that right now, the majority of the instructors are very good and fair. I have truly enjoyed all of my clinical experiences thus far and my instructors.

    As for the night program, I am currently in this! I LOVE IT!! I did a semester of days and two semesters of nights and I like nights sooooo much better! I feel we have better ratios as far as staff to student and we also get more practice time because there are not so many of us waiting to do things in Lab, etc... It is M-TH. First semester and second semester you will have (apprx) Lecture M 5-9, Lab T 5-8 and clinicals W and Th (2:30-9:30/10:30). Third semester you have clinicals M & T (up till 11pm) and Lecture W, Lab Th. First semester you do 5wks long term care, 10 wks or so of Med-Surg. Second is mostly Med-Surg with an OR observation. Third you do apprx 8 wks Med-Surg, 3 wks Psych, and 3 wks Maternity. Next semester is mostly ICU I believe. We go the first 8 wks pretty much the same as we do now. The last 6 wks though you have clinical 3 days a week (8hrs each) with 3 wks Evenings and 3 wks Days. You may be bounced around as far as facilities too. Also, you have btwn 2-4 patients the last 6 wks whereas previously you only had 1. You could be moved to days or vice-versa to fill available spaces - whether you choose or not.

    You really need to be prepared at all times. If you don't know an answer - "I don't know, but I'm looking it up right now." Keep your skills fresh. Whatever you learn in Lab you are expected to know in clinical - whether you have done it previously on a person or manequin(sp?). Start practicing NCLEX questions early - like study specific sections that pertain to areas being tested. Great review as well as prep for boards.

    Good luck! RACC gets a bad rep because there is such a low pass rate - but those who pass are well prepared! It is a very good education for the price!

    random question, do you guys get a preceptorship? ie, last semester you pick a specialty you are interested in and instead of going with your clinical group you are with a nurse working on the floor with them and are assigned their schedule and basically responsible for all of their pts while they supervise you? it sounds like you have something like that at the end where you have the 3 clinical days a week.. just curious.


    also, no Peds rotation?
  9. 0
    Thank you for all the information. I am actually excited to start. Do you feel you get enough clinical experience. One of the main things I see people post who are in diploma programs is their programs are better because they get more clinical time. But I know the hspital program by me does two days a week for only an hour more compared to the first and second terms, but then only about a half hour less compared to what you stated the last term. What facilities do you rotate too? Which ones did you like best? Do you have a job lined up through anyof the sites? Any additional info/thoughts would be appreciated.
  10. 0
    Quote from hollyj
    i am hoping to find out any information i can on racc's nursing program from students currently in it, and also from anyone in the night groups. that is what i plan on doing. thanks all!!
    here's my 2 cents:

    i found the racc program very helpful and a great program - and this is coming from someone who nearly failed out, but righted my ship and ended up with a respectable gpa, and a's for the last two semesters.

    you'll study like never before, but you learn a great deal from the profs as well - who are actually quite skilled at lecturing. i lost many classmates too - but that was mainly because the students were not used to challenging material. most students who failed out of the rn program were students who barely passed a&p i and ii - not academic stalwarts. also, being right out of hs, many students are immature and expect to keep up the 'party' lifestyle during rn education - which just isn't feasible in any rn program.

    i still maintain a few relationships with the profs there nearly 10 years later. overall a good experience.


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