Taking post-mortem pictures - page 2

by Ashley, PICU RN

4,618 Unique Views | 15 Comments

Is this a practice at any of your facilities? I know it's pretty common in NICU and L&D as part of a remembrance package, but what about in your pediatric facilities? We had a patient pass away recently and after I had gotten... Read More


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    Here are some neat resources:

    www.icingsmiles.org
    “We are Baking a Difference” Deluxe cakes for kids with terminal illnesses
    Home Page Hospitalized children can receive a phone call from a celebrity or a cartoon character. See site for information

    www.songsoflove.org
    provides personalized songs for children or teens currently facing tough medical, physical, or emotional challenges, free of charge.
    littlestheroesproject.org: The Best Search Links on the Net provides free professional portraits for children with serious illnesses or disabilities. Photos are arranged by the family and the photographer and can take place virtually anywhere. If the child’s illness is severe and immediate response is necessary, use the organization referenced below:
    child photography, The American Child Photographers Charity Guild The American Child Photographers Charity Guild Child Photographers across the nation have networked together to provide families of terminally ill children complimentary portrait sessions (taken in NICU, PICU, Hospice, home care, etc.) Able to respond at a moment’s notice.
    Hope this helps. :heartbeat mm
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    We have a program at our hospital called resolve through sharing. We ask parents if they would like their baby baptized or blessed, often they call their own clergy, or we can do it for them. We dress the baby in little gowns hats and blankets that are donated. We take hand and foot prints. We give the parents a disposable camera and ask if they would like to take pictures or have us take them or not at all. We have a checklist to go through to make sure everything gets done. We let the parents set the pace of how long they would like to hold the baby or wait until later, whether they want to be alone or have one of us there. We also refer them to support groups.
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    I work in the ER so when a patient dies it's a ME case and we do not remove tubes or wired. We clip hair and do hand and foot imprints, but have to get ME permission for that. We're also apparently supposed to tell families not to touch the patient too much but how the heck that works, I do not know. We let families hold their deceased children. Not sure how the rest of the hospital handles it.
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    Quote from hiddencatRN
    I work in the ER so when a patient dies it's a ME case and we do not remove tubes or wired. We clip hair and do hand and foot imprints, but have to get ME permission for that. We're also apparently supposed to tell families not to touch the patient too much but how the heck that works, I do not know. We let families hold their deceased children. Not sure how the rest of the hospital handles it.
    I went to an infant bereavement conference once and this is something they talked about with the ME cases. Really sad. I can't quite remember how they suggested handling the situation but at least allowing family time to hold is important. really sad though, there was a parent speaker there and her baby died from SIDS and the hospital they were at were so to the rules they almost didn't even let the parents hold.
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    Yeah, it's sad. Every family asks if we can remove the tubes and wires and we can't.Then they get tracked by DHS for a year. I had a kid with a minor injury and police came to take a report and we were all so confused about why until the mom mentioned they'd lost a baby recently to SIDS. So the police had to come and file a report to make sure there was no pattern. I get why SIDS needs to be treated as a possible crime, but in the cases where it truly is SIDS and not abuse, how devastating it must be, on top of already having feelings of guilt, to have that guilt essentially validated...Anyway, sorry for the tangent!
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    We also use Lay Me Down to Sleep for our NICU and PICU. We have a huge peds/baby bereavement group at our hospital. Many parents will not want to look at the pictures right away, but all the families eventually do want them. We have a policy for all this, also we use hospice a lot for our kids, as does the PICU. They do a lot of things for the families as the patient is dying.
    umcRN likes this.


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