Which job do I take?

  1. I am a CNA and went on an interview for a job . I walked in knowing that this particular nursing home sucks and probably the team work environment is non-existent. The interviewer basically said the place sucks and they are working on things to get it better. The distance from my home to this place is 1 mile. The other interview I went on is the job I really want and also got hired for. It's in a hospital, and and the environment is not problematic, but the drive is about 1 hour and 25 minutes 3 days a week. Has anyone been faced with this type of situation? I'd rather drive far than to deal with issues daily, even though the first job is close to my home.
    •  
  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Paws2people
    I took the job further from home, however some days I wish I hadn't. Particularly when the weather is bad and there is snow.

    Make a list of pros and cons, and let that help you make a decision. Look at reviews online, (Glassdoor) and see which one looks more promising.

    Nursing homes can be rough. A hospital can be too, of course.
  4. by   centercourt2015
    If you choose the nursing home, most likely 8 hours 5 days a week, that seems so awful considering the person interviewing said the place is basically a bad place to work. The hospital job is only 3 days a week. The experience you gain at that hospital will be more valuable, in the long run, if you try to get a hospital job closer to your home later on or if you are/want to go to nursing school.

    I think you already answered your own question.
  5. by   sroseyos
    Sounds like the hospital job will be the better fit for you, particularly if you only have to do the commute 3 times a week. That said, a long commute can wear you down over time. Is it 1.5 hrs because of distance, or traffic? I've had long commutes of both types and I think traffic is much worse (2 hours of full-speed driving didn't feel anywhere as agonizing as 1 hour in slow traffic). If you still have some time before you have to give them your decision, I'd do dry runs at the times you would be going to/coming home from work for a few days and see how it feels. If it doesn't bother you too badly, then it sounds like you'll be much happier taking that job.
  6. by   sweettooth219
    Thank you all, I guess I just asked the question for reassurance, haha. I took the hospital position and yes, the experience will be valuable when I apply to nursing school! Thanks guys!
  7. by   thewhitechickoj
    I was working in a nursing home about 20 minutes away from home with a 4 on/2 off rotation. I'm now working at a hospital 1 hour away and full-time is 3 days a week. The pay difference makes up for the drive, in my opinion. Even though I have to spend a little more on gas, I'm still bringing home a lot more than when I was at the nursing home. Plus, at the hospital I'm gathering experience that I'd never have the opportunity to do at the nursing home like using the bladder scanner and taking out foleys.
  8. by   Paws2people
    Quote from sweettooth219
    Thank you all, I guess I just asked the question for reassurance, haha. I took the hospital position and yes, the experience will be valuable when I apply to nursing school! Thanks guys!

    Excellent! Best of luck!
  9. by   keke24
    I am in almost the same boat! Except the nursing home is not that bad but I want hospital experience! I feel like hospital experience as a CNA looks better when you apply for RN jobs AND if they like you you'll have a job as an RN ASAP PLUS hospitals will often pay for your higher education --> BSN, NP!

    Also since I would be working evenings (3-11:30) I will be driving there a few hours early to avoid traffic and get my study time in its just something to think about to avoid traffic

    I say it's worth it if you really want to work in a hospital
  10. by   thewhitechickoj
    Quote from keke24
    I feel like hospital experience as a CNA looks better when you apply for RN jobs AND if they like you you'll have a job as an RN ASAP PLUS hospitals will often pay for your higher education --> BSN, NP!
    My current manager keeps telling me that she can't wait to have me working as a RN on the floor whenever I see her. She says, are you done with nursing school, yet? Haha. Plus my work has both a tuition reimbursement program which will repay your tuition costs based on how long you've been there after you finish a term, and an enhanced tuition program that will actually pay for your tuition upfront if you meet income requirements. The only requirement of the employee is to remain employed with the organization for 1 year after completing the courses you were reimbursed for.

Must Read Topics


close