standard new graduation orientation/training (caution, venting)

  1. 0
    So, I'm just curious, how much time did you get before you were able to "run" your room? I have been bounced around in general, some lap's, some open; some gyn lap, robotic, and open. I reach my 90 day (start day to 90 day mark) at the end of Jan. During the 90 day period, I was off (because I'm still in training they didn't want me working since it was "slow") for thanksgiving, christmas, new years, and eight days due to an on the job injury. In addition, to alot of videos, books, and computer classes, and other random things they had me doing.
    Long story short, I have an estimated 21 days actual "intra-op" in the suites. Split among, a few bits and pieces of cysto, robot, gyn, and more general (i.e. lap chole *sp). At this point my educators feel that I should "run" my room, with help when needed from a preceptor. So, basically, I'm not ready. ttt
    I do not know all of the various bits, parts, attachments, varieties of all of the lap equipment, the harmonic, the ligasure, etc, etc. I feel that I have made progress daily, although I never have the same preceptor (about 5-6) different people, telling me their version of what is crucial and what is not. I am supposed to chart my peri-op doc and all of the pick list in under 15 minutes. Nevermind, knowing what the 5-6 (at least) different surgeons require for gloves, music, sutures, and how they prefer the such and such.
    So regardless of my best efforts, I HATE the OR and I feel incompetent. My manager wanted me to prove that in the next 10 working days I can, completely run my room, including pt. check in, room set up, all the way til transfer. I should also know that when a stupid piece of equipment doesn't work, I am to fix it. regardless the problem or my familiarity with the machine. I am constantly getting conflicting feedback, everything is an oxymoron.
    So, the second time my NM called me into his office, they said they would like to see me succeed, whether it be in the OR or somewhere else in the hospital (in ten days working time). So I was honest, I don't like the OR, I am not the type of person who wants to cater to a surgeon, do very little patient care except during induction and emergence, and learn to assemble and maintain multitudes of equipment. I believe I am in the wrong area. According to my supervisors, everyone else runs the room this fast. I was under the impression that the OR was a very difficult area to learn, requiring the longest training along with areas like ICU.
    My NM stated they would help me, or try to help me find another area of the hospital that might suit me. So I told them I would like to find another area, but Im not sure If I should have just buckled down, lied about how much I "love" the OR and killed myself to prove I want to be in the suites. I may have shot myself in the foot by being honest because I really need a job. *sigh...
    It is hard to face the reality that I failed, or at least I feel like a failure. Thank you everyone in advance for your reply.
  2. 7 Comments so far...

  3. 1
    They all expect too much. They have all been doing it for so long that it is like breathing to them and they cannot comprehend why others have difficulty with the overwhelming amount of knowledge and paperwork The entire medical system is running faster and faster and will be even more so when affordable care hits. I am hearing in many places that there will be no upsurge in hiring with the avalanche of new pts and no new beds. Rather, pts will simply get discharged faster and faster. It is very much like "Alice Through the Looking Glass". You have to run twice as fast just to stay in the same spot, nevermind get anywhere.
    ShariDCST likes this.
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    The OR is not for everyone - and better to reflect early on and find your passion than be miserable. Our orientation to the OR program is 6 months long, with the new hire gradually being asked to assume independence and responsibility. Best of luck finding your niche. The beauty of nursing is that there are many from which to choose...
    debbieuk and ShariDCST like this.
  5. 1
    Most OR internships run 6 months. On average, you get 6 weeks in all major services, in both the scrub and circulator role. I've never heard of a 90 day OR internship. Does your facility use AORN's Periop 101 program or the PBDS program? I imagine you're more afraid than anything, and it's within reason to be. I would get your educator involved, he/she would be your strongest advocate to ensure that you're comfortable AND that your patients are safe.
    ShariDCST likes this.
  6. 0
    Many people decide during orientation that the OR is not for them. There's no shame in that. The beauty of nursing is that there are tons of options out there.
  7. 0
    I have been experiencing the same problem. I have started a Periop 101 program and am terribly afraid that I've made a mistake. I think it would be best to get out now but don't want to hurt my chances of getting a position in the future.
  8. 2
    My NM and ANM met with me again and basically said I was still not rocking the or, I had two weeks left on my 90 day probationary period, if I wasn't up to par, we would need to see about transferring me, helping me find another area if I wanted to stay at the hospital. said they would help me succeed in OR or elsewhere if it came to that. So I told them I didn't feel the OR was a right fit, so they helped me transfer/interview for a tele floor and I'm so grateful and much happier. People are spot on when they say you either love or hate the OR, try as I might to be somewhere in the middle, it just wasn't going to happen. I was one of those that absolutely hated it. The OR is not meant for everyone. The people belonging in the OR specialty are a unique wonderful breed that are intrinsically able to kick butt in the operating room. Good luck to you!
    debbieuk and GadgetRN71 like this.
  9. 0
    My NM and ANM met with me again and basically said I was still not rocking the or, I had two weeks left on my 90 day probationary period, if I wasn't up to par, we would need to see about transferring me, helping me find another area if I wanted to stay at the hospital. said they would help me succeed in OR or elsewhere if it came to that. So I told them I didn't feel the OR was a right fit, so they helped me transfer/interview for a tele floor and I'm so grateful and much happier. People are spot on when they say you either love or hate the OR, try as I might to be somewhere in the middle, it just wasn't going to happen. I was one of those that absolutely hated it. The OR is not meant for everyone. The people belonging in the OR specialty are a unique wonderful breed that are intrinsically able to kick butt in the operating room. Good luck to you!


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