RNFA 'S - page 5

Are there any RNFA's that are MAD or getting Mad about the Surgical scrub first assisting? Maybe we should be! #1 This is a job we have worked very hard for, we went to school to get a degree and... Read More

  1. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Still not a reason why they have to tolerate it though.
    So true Marie.
  2. by   JAL85
    Hey..........I have just started my RNFA training program. I hear what you are saying. The surgeon who encouraged me to become an RNFA originally hired a ST as his group's assistant because it was cheaper than hiring an RN. Then he discovered that she couldn't do any of the pre- and post-op duties. He also discovered that as skilled as she was as a ST, her knowledge jsut didn't measure up to any of the OR nurses, much less an RNFA. So, my suggestion is not to get mad.............get ahead. Make sure that you are as knowledgeable as possible. Act as an educator to everyone........including the surgeons, residents, RN, ST, patients and their families about what an RNFA is and can offer. Maintain the hightest level of professionalsim. Check the job decsriptions that your facility and department has regarding who can act as an assistant. Get your manager and senior VP of nursing behind you. Have all of your little ducks in a row. Hang in there.
  3. by   bikemoab
    I am currently an RNFA intern in a hospital that does not recognize RNFA's. The director has told us that he is not willing to pursue a policy for using RNFA's. Is there anyone who has gone through this process. The hospital will not give me privileges because I am not masters prepared.
  4. by   bikemoab
    Help, my facility doesn't recognize RNFA's. The surgeons are enjoying the free interns through temporary privileges. Any suggestions on setting up policy and procedures?
  5. by   afarve1
    Hello all!
    I have a question for all of you.
    I will be graduating in May 2006 and am looking forward to becoming an OR nurse, and I would love to eventually become an RNFA. However, I will be moving to England to get married and live there in 2007 and was wondering about accredidations and schools there, and if this is even possible?
    Thanks so much.
    Sincerely,
    Amy
  6. by   CDZCRNFA
    Quote from ORJUNKIE
    I think that there has not been a good job in the education of what CRNFA really means. This is a big bone of contention where I work because a few people attended a TWO week course (and they really think they are qualified to be consultant assistants like an MD has been - get real!)and now think they should only have to scrub in as an assistant. Most doctors don't end up letting them do anything more than what we've always done as second scrubs! Why should we support an already burdened healthcare cost system and charge patients for services that truly aren't necessary? Come on folks, be honest with yourselves! This is another example of delusions of grandeur. The same people who insisted twenty years ago that you wouldn't be a good nurse unless you had a BSN or MSN, thus causing the demise of many a good ADN and Diploma program, are probably the same people who made up this nonsense about attending a two week course and then considering yourself qualified to work as a CRNFA! All of us who have worked with new BSN/MSN grads know that the ADN and Diploma nurses are generally better able to care for patients straight out of school.
  7. by   ortess1971
    What do you consider assisting? I was under the impression that first assists can close the patient (under the surgeon's supervision,) cut tissue etc. There are some CST-First Assist programs but not all states recognize them. As a tech, I am only allowed to retract, cut suture and other non-invasive things. One of the GU surgeons I work with wanted me to bovie tissue the other day, and as cool as that would have been, I told him that I am not allowed to do that. I am graduating nursing school in 4 weeks and am thinking about being an RNFA someday. It is a lot of work and they train very hard...I know I don't feel comfortable first assisting as a scrub....Isn't it illegal?
  8. by   devilsadvocate
    Ok, I just have to chime in here. I have read this thread from start to finish and all I can say to you elitist nurses is get over yourselves. Before I go on, a little about me. I started as a OR tech, became a CST, then an RN, then a BSN and I am now about to begin Osteopathic medical school.
    From my experience (and I have years of it in most every scope of practice here) the only difference between a OR tech, a CST, an RN scrub, a surgical PA or a RNFA at the bedside, is their title and their check. Each one does a safe, competent job, but each one could do any part of that job with training. You can not tell me that I need a 2 year residency is necessary to learn to suture a wound!
    Each one of you can spout off all you want to about how much "safer" an RN is in the OR, but you and I both know that when the #@8! hits the fan, you stand there and watch like a scared puppy while the Surgeon and the CRNA/Anesthesiologist deal with the problem. You also know as well as I do, that you don't need four years of school to hold a clamp and cut a suture. You don't need 6 years of school to suture a wound, and you certainly don't need initials behind your name to know what you should not do.
    Now that my rant is over, can't we all just get along? Health care continues to specialize. To the point where everyone will eventually have an initial to change a bed pan. Instead of all these infantile turf wars, over things anyone can do, lets focus on the real issues and provide the patient centered care you were meant to provide. You are not focused on patient care at all, you are focused on your on petty rivalries and on ego protection.
    To all you nurses who think you are the only "SAFE" care provider in the OR... HAHAHAHAHA. I will take a surgical tech, who has received one to two years of specific training as a scrub over an RN with her 2 week orientation and his/her full time ego-pushing, elitist peers anyday. I know the difference first hand and you are WAY out classed.
    How many weeks did you spend reviewing specific types of surgical cases and doing case studies? How much time did you spend in a lab getting the hand scrub perfect, or learning to think critically about surgical field contamination. Do you even realize the level of surgical training that a CST gets? Do you honestly think a class in microbiology, physiology and a 6 week clinical rotation through an OR watching from the bed side or documenting the type of suture was used, in any way makes you more qualified than the CST who spent months learning the complete process for each specific surgical case. In fact, the school I attended used a residents surgical text and taught us procedures exactly like a surgical resident learn?
    What do you think a CST studies in school? While you spent 2 years learning a little about all aspects of nursing, a CST spends one or two yeras focusing on surgical procedures and sterile technique only. You are way, way, way, out classed here. You have been instructed how to push meds and document. The CST learned CPR just like you did and I will guarantee you that they have a better understanding of the surgical case, the anatomy & physiology, and how to complete a procedure.
    The word nurse comes from the word that means to nurish. Nurses should spend more time caring for patients needs and less time trying to become Doctors without degrees. We all get it, you didn't go to/get into medical school and now you are just bitter. LET IT GO! Accept the fact that CST are qualified, competent and necessary. Just like nurses, PA's and RNFA's.
    There is a serious and critical nursing shortage out here and it is getting worse every single day. Your jobs are not going anywhere. Now go to work, give everyone a group hug, leave your ego in the locker room and have a great day.
  9. by   Kabin
    Quote from devilsadvocate
    Ok, I just have to chime in here. I have read this thread from start to finish and all I can say to you elitist nurses is get over yourselves.
    Sounds like the pot calling the kettle black.
  10. by   shodobe
    He sounds just a bit bitter about something. He can come and spend a few days in my OR and we'll see who gets the best of who. His post started out OK and it just deteriorated after that. I wasn't really sure what he was getting at maybe he was upset that he didn't get into a "real" medical school. I will have pity on all those who have to deal with this guy because it seems he is the one who has a chip on his shoulder and maybe he should get "over it" instead of all nurses who have been through the "wars". I don't get into posts that belittle people like this one did, but I just couldn't resist. I personaaly think this is a troll looking to start up a fight, just ignore it.
  11. by   surgpa
    Quote from JAL85
    Hey..........I have just started my RNFA training program. I hear what you are saying. The surgeon who encouraged me to become an RNFA originally hired a ST as his group's assistant because it was cheaper than hiring an RN. Then he discovered that she couldn't do any of the pre- and post-op duties. He also discovered that as skilled as she was as a ST, her knowledge jsut didn't measure up to any of the OR nurses, much less an RNFA. So, my suggestion is not to get mad.............get ahead. Make sure that you are as knowledgeable as possible. Act as an educator to everyone........including the surgeons, residents, RN, ST, patients and their families about what an RNFA is and can offer. Maintain the hightest level of professionalsim. Check the job decsriptions that your facility and department has regarding who can act as an assistant. Get your manager and senior VP of nursing behind you. Have all of your little ducks in a row. Hang in there.
    Explain to me what "preop and postop care" things you can do. Just an educational question.

    Mike PA/RN
  12. by   callbabe
    I hate to burst your bubble but.... I have been an OR nurse for 33 years, and the last 10 I have practiced as an RNFA. I am very proud of my work and my peers respect me along with the surgeons I work with. If you are going to med school do not make a surgeon provided you could anyway. With your attitude I would not want to work with you good, great doctors know they cannot function without the help of nurses. I to work with some very smart, and very qualified CST. In the OR we all have our places and the techs should be behind a mayo. I learned how to scrub 33 years ago and have worked very hard to get were I am at. I do not think that nurses with a few years of experience should not be allowed to function as an assistant. I takes years of experience to be a proficent scrub, circulator, or a 1st assistant. If you make a surgeon and you hire a tech it will be be cause they will be cheaper, well you get what you pay for.
    Last edit by Jay-Jay on Nov 29, '06 : Reason: Name-calling, rudeness
  13. by   Lee75
    I'm a RNFA, however I have not worked as one b/c I moved to England shortly after finishing the program. I will be returning to the states soon and hoping to get the opportunity to utilize my RNFA. My question is, do most hospitals require you to be certified to work as an employee (RNFA) of the hospital? Just trying to decide if it's necessary for me to go back to school for a BSN so that I can become certified. Thanks.

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