Blood transfusions

  1. Who does the blood transfusions in the OR?
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   kellyanne
    Originally posted by Lulu_camel:
    Who does the blood transfusions in the OR?
    From my experience with transfusions, the circulating RN's responsibility is to verifiy pt info and the blood product info with anesthesia. Two people are need to verify info. Included is pt name, ss#, blood bank armband, and blood product info. After I verified this info with anesthesia I sign my name. It is the resposibilty of anesthesia to document the rest since they are the ones who are administrating the product.

  4. by   angel03
    Quote from kellyanne
    From my experience with transfusions, the circulating RN's responsibility is to verifiy pt info and the blood product info with anesthesia. Two people are need to verify info. Included is pt name, ss#, blood bank armband, and blood product info. After I verified this info with anesthesia I sign my name. It is the resposibilty of anesthesia to document the rest since they are the ones who are administrating the product.
    :angel2::angel2::angel2:I believe it is your particular hospital policy on how to administer blood....my experience always 2 RN's or and RN and doc or Doc and doc check pts name mr# blood type unit # exp. date aganist name band and stamper card....we sign and anesthesia administers...ofcourse they document all vs since they are monitoring the patient.....we can not accept blood from another unit we can only get the blood from the blood bank and we can not send blood with the patient (only exception is if it is in the process of infusing) and the blood bank requires a stamped card with patient information which when picked up it then checked with patients name and mr# by the blood bank personel and the person picking up the blood and this is how we try to eliminate problems
  5. by   Rudegal2020
    So is anesthesia the only one that can administer the blood?
  6. by   sharann
    The anesthesiologists in our hospital give the transfusions in the O.R. The circ RN checks the blood product with them, but the MDA gives it, as well as any other med or fluid. The circulator does not give any drugs or fluid since they are watching the room and the pt.
  7. by   shodobe
    I have been hanging and running blood in our OR for over 25 years. We check it with the anesthesiologist but usually we are the ones who hang and run it. I always set-up the Hot Line. I also have hung other fluids and have pushed meds if needed by anesthesia, when they are busy with ventilating. No big deal. I guess it has never been an issue and perfectly legal. Mike
  8. by   angel03
    Quote from KNIRU23
    So is anesthesia the only one that can administer the blood?
    In our OR the CRNA's or docs are the only ones
  9. by   shodobe
    angel03, why? Just curious. Mike
  10. by   angel03
    Quote from shodobe
    angel03, why? Just curious. Mike
    On our floors and units the RNs hung blood...in our OR because anesthesia is in charge of monitoring fluids ( we don't hang anything unless its an emergency ...(we can)... we don't record or monitor fluids we don't monitor urine out put we don't administer drugs to the patient....(we can)....it's given to anestheia and they do...only because they monitor and we don't...if we had to we could but one person is in charge as it should be.... lessens the confusion
    Last edit by angel03 on Sep 2, '04 : Reason: explain better
  11. by   kyti
    Quote from angel03
    On our floors and units the RNs hung blood...in our OR because anesthesia is in charge of monitoring fluids ( we don't hang anything unless its an emergency ...(we can)... we don't record or monitor fluids we don't monitor urine out put we don't administer drugs to the patient....(we can)....it's given to anestheia and they do...only because they monitor and we don't...if we had to we could but one person is in charge as it should be.... lessens the confusion
    Same here where I am.
  12. by   jwk
    Quote from shodobe
    angel03, why? Just curious. Mike
    Because in the OR, that is entirely anesthesia's responsibility. All administration of fluids, blood, drugs (except locally infiltrated anesthetics) etc. in the OR should be done by anesthesia. It is anesthesia's responsibility to keep track of I's and O's. They're the ones who make the decisions about what to give and when, whether the patient needs blood or fluid or colloids, or whatever.

    Our circulators do the number checks with us, sign, and that's it. If your CRNA's and MD's are having the OR nurse hang the blood routinely, they're just plain lazy IMHO.
  13. by   shodobe
    I think you are missing the point, usually when blood is needed to be hung the patient is in a critical state and anesthesia's attention is focused on one thing. Hanging blood for them doesn't constitute laziness just a team effort to get things done. They are still rersponsible for all I&Os and keep track of all fluids. I still make note in my papers about the blood, time hung, bag number, etc... I only do this as a favor to them to speed things up especially in critical moments. I have NEVER had an opinion that I was doing it because they were lazy. I couldn't stand the idea of watching my gas passer struggle with all he has to do for the patient, just so I wouldn't have to be bothered with hanging a simple bag of blood for them. Now, that's what I call lazy. Mike
  14. by   carcha
    I think Shodobe is really one of my work colleagues here in London. We do exactly the same as you. Hang and give blood, fluids, platelets, ffp's, gelo, we monitor urine output, do blood gases, prepare art and cvp and peripheral lines, iv medication,. I love it all, and lucky for us the medical team agree with a load of our suggestions and comments on patient care within the OR and PACU, so we get to plan a lot of intra and post op care as well. I dont feel at all like I'm going outside my domain as the md still has to make the final decision on what the patient actually has ect but it allows me to use my nursing knowledge and skills to make the journey a little more comfortable for the patient.

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