What's The Weirdest Name You've Heard A Patient Name Her Baby? - page 125

Hi, I was wondering about some of those weird names that you've probably encountered in L&D and PP. I remember when I had my maternity rotation a couple of weeks ago, one of the nurses said she... Read More

  1. by   santhony44
    Saw a couple of new ones today:
    Majik.

    Makaveli.
  2. by   queenjean
    Mercy, my post was not addressing you directly, just articulating my discomfort with the idea that "there should be a law." "You" being the universal "you-all"--it seems easier to say "you" instead of the grammatically correct "one"--but that seems so stilted, if admittedly more clear. If you've got a few hours to kill and read the entire thread, you'll see the occasional sentiment that there should be some sort of rule to prevent people from naming their children certain names. I'm expressing my discomfort with the idea of official rules on names.

    I am fully aware that the incident with the infant named Friday occurred in Italy; if you spend some time googling it, anyone can find other examples of government overruling parents on the naming of their children--present day Germany pops immediately to mind. In part, my post was to make others think about the disadvantages of having such rules here. We always think rules that we feel to be a good idea would never actually work against us--but anything that restricts such a basic freedom would.

    And obviously, if we have nurses who are telling mothers that they have too many apostrophes and "s" in the name and they can't name the child that, then we *DO* have an issue with that right here in this country. I freely admit that I have no idea if there are actually rules in place regarding consonents and apostrophies, or any other symbols or numbers for that matter. Does anyone know if there are rules regarding the use of these things on birth certificates? The person who files our birth certificates at work doesn't work the same shift I do, so I can't ask her.
    Last edit by queenjean on Dec 24, '07
  3. by   tmulder
    Just had a patient name her baby

    Rowdy


    Hope this kid doesn't take his name to seriously or she'll have her hands full
  4. by   santhony44
    Quote from tmulder
    Just had a patient name her baby
    Rowdy

    Hope this kid doesn't take his name to seriously or she'll have her hands full

    That does seem to be tempting fate, doesn't it??
  5. by   L&DRN03
    I had a patient name her little girl Naturale Destiny. The story behind the name was that the patient was a scheduled c/s for breech presentation and the baby had turned at the last minute and so she delivered "naturally". We always wonder what her name would have been had she been a c/section/
  6. by   sunrise67
    I also once had a patient named Shayde. He had siblings named Shakayde, Shailyce and Shailynn. We have a patient in our office now named Hennessey. Luckily she is a foster child and her foster family is adopting her. They call her Hannah.
  7. by   StrwbryblndRN
    I love hearing all the names. Some very famous people have very not so common names. But once we hear them enough we do not think anything of it. Like these famous first names. Newt, Blythe,Uma (at least uncommon in america) Tiger, etc.

    Many names I saw listed may not be uncommon in other parts of the world.
    20 Years ago we had a German exchange student visit us and her name was Silke .
    My mom's name is Jutta. In German it sounds like the state Utah. So everyone calls her Utah. And to make it easy sometimes she spells it that way.
  8. by   rph3664
    Quote from Strwbryblnd
    I love hearing all the names. Some very famous people have very not so common names. But once we hear them enough we do not think anything of it. Like these famous first names. Newt, Blythe,Uma (at least uncommon in america) Tiger, etc.

    Many names I saw listed may not be uncommon in other parts of the world.
    20 Years ago we had a German exchange student visit us and her name was Silke .
    My mom's name is Jutta. In German it sounds like the state Utah. So everyone calls her Utah. And to make it easy sometimes she spells it that way.
    Newt Gingrich's real name is Newton and Blythe is not a common name but it's more than a wide spot in the California desert. And Uma is a fairly common Swedish name.

    I'm pretty sure Tiger Woods is a Jr. and they gave him the nickname just so they would know which Eldrick they were talking about.

    I work with a man whose legal name is Ricky but we all call him Rick, but his badge has his real name on it and someone once told him, "What kind of a name is that? That's a little kid's name!" Which it once was, but it's his name and his parents gave it to him on the day he was born.
  9. by   aunt_ning2
    I have a somewhat wacky name. My name is Jeannie. I am named after I dream of Jeannie (my sister named me, she's 10 years older.) and NO one ever pronounces it right, nor spells it correctly.

    My neice's nickname is KiKi and she wont answer to anything else(her real name is Kristina Richelle but my dad called her Wookie from the day she was born and when she started talkiing Kiki came out and that is what she is, even registered in school as KiKi)

    My Sister Krissy(passed away) and my Neice KiKi have the middle name of Richelle that my mother made up it is pronounced Rich- L for my father whose name is Richard.


    I went to school with a Flower Pollen Stem and a Bird Flying Cloud and a Flaming Albino Chicken (and was as dark as can be, dark italian skiin and black hair and eyes) first two are sisters and the 3rd is their brother but none had the parents last name
  10. by   FroggieLiz
    Quote from queenjean
    Whoa, wait a minute--you told someone they couldn't name their baby a certain name, because it had too many apostrophes and "s" in it?
    No, not S's. It had -, ', and `. I told her she couldn't name her baby that on the birth certificate. Then, I just wanted to know why she chose that kind of name, so I asked. No ethical problems, here. So long as it fits on the birth certificate, I don't care what they name the baby. I don't know what the woman ended up putting on the certificate, but I just know that a previous patient had her packet returned for "invalid" name or something and was told by another nurse that it was because of the non-letter characters.
  11. by   queenjean
    Well, that seems reasonable-though I do know names that have dashes, apostrophes and the like. So what *are* the approved vs unapproved characters? Anyone?
  12. by   StrwbryblndRN
    It is funny you mentioned the name Ricky. My husband's name is Ricky and people at work call him Rick.
    He is a junior and and when he was little he was called little Ricky.
    He even married a Lucy.

    Quote from rph3664
    Newt Gingrich's real name is Newton and Blythe is not a common name but it's more than a wide spot in the California desert. And Uma is a fairly common Swedish name.

    I'm pretty sure Tiger Woods is a Jr. and they gave him the nickname just so they would know which Eldrick they were talking about.

    I work with a man whose legal name is Ricky but we all call him Rick, but his badge has his real name on it and someone once told him, "What kind of a name is that? That's a little kid's name!" Which it once was, but it's his name and his parents gave it to him on the day he was born.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
  13. by   Jamesdotter
    Re: the name "Ricky" A woman I went to school with named her son "Ricky Lynn." Her mother had a fit--my friend was 5'11 and her husband was about 6'4 and her mom insisted that that name was going to be ridiculous when he was a "huge man"(her words)

close