RNC?

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    How many nurses have their RNC? When did you get it; at 2 years or more OB experience? How is certification looked upon on your units? I have 14 years experience in nursing, but am new to Mother-Baby. I do not see myself as an NP so I probably will not go that route, but hope to be considered a resource person on the unit someday.

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  2. 9 Comments...

  3. 0
    We have many RNCs on our unit; most are certified in Maternal-Newborn, though a few are OB-certified from their time spent in L&D. My place does reimburse a certain amount of the testing fee, though I'm not sure how much of the total it comes out to be. Each place is different on that, though.

    I think in order to sit for the exam, you have to have 2 years of experience in the field. Most of my colleagues - even those with double-digit years in the field still said they had to study.
  4. 0
    Our hospital is going for magnet status, so they are encouraging EVERYONE who is eligible to get their RNC.

    About 25% or our nurses are certified. You must have 2 years of experience in your field before you can sit for the exam. It was not an easy test, I had flashbacks of my state boards while I was taking the RNC Exam. LOL.

    We do not get any compensation other than the hospital pays for the exam.
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    trouble editing, see below
    Last edit by mnbrn on Nov 11, '10
  6. 0
    Our pays for the exam if you pass, and then you are eligible to climb the clinical ladder (partner, senior partner) to get a slight pay increase. I was not eligible to do this when I was in NICU because I was not full time. I am a NANN member though, I like to keep up on research.

    When I took a full time position in Mother-Baby, I joined AWHONN and started reading everything I could. I am thinking of asking for the core curriculum book for maternal-newborn nursing for Christmas.
  7. 1
    I just took the exam almost 2 months ago and passed! I have 4 years exp in L&D, nursery and Postpartum. I have been out of OB full time for almost a year and still work PRN while working on my doctorate degree in nursing. I studied some PCEP books and reviewed some AWHONN literature before the test. My test was 175 questions and I finished in about an hour and a half.

    Good luck to you
    diamondmeadowsRN likes this.
  8. 0
    I got certified in Inpatient OB after being in L&D for 2 years. That was the requirement at that time and I believe it still is that way. It has not been a requirement on any unit I have worked on, but it has always been a financial bonus to have it. The pay increase has been more to be certified than to have a higher degree. I didn't get into nursing until I was 40 yrs. old and having a lot of student loan debt didn't seem like the thing to do. Getting the certification was my compromise. I have been glad about my decision. The studying I have done to maintain the certification has applied more to my clinical experience than the courses for a BSN. At this point, I have been in nursing for 20 years. Short of winning the lottery, I will not go back for my BSN or any advanced degree. I have been pleased to have the national certification.
  9. 0
    Is the course material and test all online.
  10. 0
    I earned my Inpatient OB certification back in 1994 after working in L&D for 3 yrs. The exam was very difficult (I thought it was even harder than the boards), but I've always been proud I got it. My hospital reimbursed us for the exam cost and gave us a $0.50/hr. raise too. I just earned my case management certification, but although my current employer will reimburse me for the exam fee, they don't give us a raise (even though they require it).
  11. 0
    This site doesn't appear to be as active as it was. Thanks for responding.


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