New OB Nurses, Grads and Students, Please Feel Free to post your questions here: - page 10

Mugwump had a great idea offering services to new grads as a mentor (thank you for that!) So, I thought having a "sticky" for new grads, OB nurses, students, and others with questions who want... Read More

  1. by   BETSRN
    [QUOTE=NurseCyd]Hi all. I've been reading some of your posts and have already discovered some great new information. I have an interview this Thursday on an L & D floor at one of the hospitals here. It is supposed to be a really good floor, very high patient satisfaction, and so on. I've been working in the NICU since February (before that I did med-surg) and am pretty miserable there. Anyway, to get to my question: if I get hired for this job, how long do you think it will take for me to feel confident? I know that's probably a silly question, but I want your opinion. I just don't want to be a "job-hopper" and then end up hating it. I enjoyed the L & D clinicals I had in school........it was all so amazing to me........
    I guess I'm just feeling nervous about the interview. I just want to be good at my job..........most of all, I want to be happy in my job, you know? Thanks for any info you can offer..........

    :uhoh21:[/QUOT
    It's going to take a year at least to even begin to feel confident. Of course, I guess it might depend on the level of acuity of the patinets and/or the nurse's autonomy.
    Good luck!
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    You know what, It's ok to know when a job is not for you and to move on. NICU takes a special type of nurse, if you ask me. Not "better", but definately a certain personality does best in the NICU environment. They say L and D does, too. They all say we are "different" in my hospital, whatever that means.

    I interpret that as being a matter of each nurse finding his or her own niche. I know ED nurses seem a "certain type"----so do ICU and OR, etc.

    So, you have determined NICU is not your thing. That is ok to admit that and try something else. It's not "job hopping" to try and find what you enjoy and is best for you.

    Personally, I KNOW I would never work out well in a NICU. Too many psychosocial issues I don't care to deal with. (OB has them too, but they differ). I am not a good long term care person, either. NICU babies can be there for months, and the family situations are never, ever easy. You are nursing an entire family, NOT just a baby, when you are working in the NICU.

    Also, the day to day watching and worrying over your tiny and delicate patient teetering between death and life is not easy, either. That is why I say it takes a "special" nurse to cope in NICU. Because it does! My hat is off to them.

    I say, try L/D. It may very much be more to like your liking. Don't remain in NICU if it's not for you. You owe yourself more than a fast road to burn-out. And I know of no faster way to burn out than working in a place you can't stand to. You may like OB better, esp if you prefer more short-term care of people like I do!

    Good luck, Cyd, and let us know if there is more we can do to help you out.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on Jun 7, '05
  3. by   jvcrn
    You do realize it's cold in Massachusetts. right? Stay in the south we need you here! Ask me about a great little maternity center on the southeast coast.
    :Melody:
    Quote from leo_bsn
    I think this is a great idea! I will be graduating in late 2005 from an accelerated BSN program and am about 90% sure that I want to go into Women's/Maternity nursing. I have about a million questions! I know this has been asked before, but I will be moving to the Northeast (I am currently in the South) after graduation and am wondering if hospitals hire new grads directly into PP/MI? How do I even begin my job search? If I know that I want to work on a MI floor upon graduation, do I start looking now for available positions? How will hospitals know if they will have openings in December of '05? Can I work in Massachusetts without having taken the NCLEX yet or do I need to graduate, take the NCLEX, THEN apply for jobs? I am not getting much guidance from my school. Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks...
  4. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Leo, the general rule of thumb I learned in job seminars is to put out feelers when you are 90-120 days from your availability date. You can always call HR departments for more information.

    To find hospitals and (also HR departments) see this site:

    www.hospitalsoup.com
  5. by   jvcrn
    Quote from CEG
    I am a labor and delivery/midwife hopeful.

    I have applied to an accelerated BSN/MSN program that will allow me to work while doing my MSN part time so I can get a few years experience. My question is, how can I increase my chances of getting a L & D or PP job after completing my RN certification? Would becoming a childbirth educator help? No hospitals in my area allow volunteers in L & D so that't not an option. I am a working on Doula certification so I have that going for me.

    Any suggestions I would love. I know some people feel direct entry programs are bad due to lack of experience, but getting the job in L & D would give me 3 or 4 years' experience. Thanks for the help!!
    Many hospitals employ nurse techs. In our hospital we hire nursing students to work as patient care technicians. They see and do a lot. I have found graduate nurses who have worked in this role on the unit are more prepared for their first clinical position. On the OB units I have worked the techs start out doing nursing assistant work but mostly quickly pick up on other tasks such as setting up for delivery. It is a great learning experience and you get paid.The techs showing the most initiative have more time to help in L&D.
    Last edit by jvcrn on Jun 7, '05
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from jvcrn
    Many hospitals employ nurse techs. In our hospital we hire nursing students to work as patient care technicians. They see and do a lot. I have found graduate nurses who have worked in this role on the unit are more prepared for their first clinical position. On the OB units I have worked the techs start out doing nursing assistant work but mostly quickly pick up on other tasks such as setting up for delivery. It is a great learning experience and you get paid.The techs showing the most initiative have more time to help in L&D.
    very good point.
  7. by   cydney7
    Thanks for the response, Blu. I'm so glad that I found this website. There are so many different people with so many different kinds of advice, you know?
    I'm excited about the possibility of working in OB. I always loved it when I was in school........but it's also a little scary too. I've only been a nurse for a year (one year on June 25th.....yay!), and I've already been through two different orientations, one of which was in the NICU. One of my big worries is looking like a "job-hopper." I'm desperate to find what fits me. And the NICU is not it. I mean, I love babies, but I miss interaction with adults. And adult women having babies sounds like a good combo for me, you know?
    Anyway, thanks again. I will let you know how the interview goes Thursday. Talk to you again soon, I'm sure.






    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    NO silly questions ever!! Please feel free to ask whatever comes to your mind. Welcome to the boards, Cyd.

    It took me about 2 years' fulltime work in OB to feel at all close to "competent". It varies. You may be there sooner, but allow at least a full year to feel really any sort of confidence.

    I wish you the best in your new career! Please feel free to ask anything that comes up. Always glad to mentor a New OB/GYN nurse!
  8. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Well, do let us know how you are doing, Cyd---as well as what you decide to do. If there is anything more we can do to help, please ask!
  9. by   cydney7
    Thanks a lot. Will talk to you again soon. Probably will post something tomorrow to let you know about the interview.




    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Well, do let us know how you are doing, Cyd---as well as what you decide to do. If there is anything more we can do to help, please ask!
  10. by   cydney7
    Hey all, especially BluEyes--

    I got the job in labor and delivery! I went to the interview and she offered me the position, so I took it, of course.
    I'm excited, but nervous. I start July 5th. I'm sure I will be here a lot, asking for advice. But in the meantime, if anyone has any advice for a "newbie" let me know.

    Cydney
  11. by   new_mom2005
    Quote from NurseCyd
    Hey all, especially BluEyes--

    I got the job in labor and delivery! I went to the interview and she offered me the position, so I took it, of course.
    I'm excited, but nervous. I start July 5th. I'm sure I will be here a lot, asking for advice. But in the meantime, if anyone has any advice for a "newbie" let me know.

    Cydney
    Ohhhhh HOW GREAT... I AM HAPPY FOR YOU..... i am so glad you got the job... :hatparty: :hatparty: :hatparty:
  12. by   SmilingBluEyes
    WOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOHOOOOOOOOOOOOOO way to go Cyd! Just remember, we are a resource for you. You will have questions, please ask us!!!

    CONGRATULATIONS TO YOU, and welcome to OB NURSING!
  13. by   BandEmom
    Hi all-

    to you experienced OB RN's out there - do the experienced ones get to do things without orders - such as dc'ing IV fluids post c/s, or advancing a diet - like if you knew a doctor would let you get away with it? The facility that fired me was furious that I did such a thing -UNDER THE ADVICE OF THE PRECEPTOR- which did not help my defense. I have moved on and started working in M/S at another facility where I've been assured a job in OB after 6-12 months, but I can't help looking in the rear view mirror on occasion. At my former employer, this kind of thing was just an everyday occurence that was done by mainly the 15+ yrs nurses. Also, what is "normal" behavior for a new grad? Is it ok to be relearning things that we've seen once upon a time in nursing school? Is it supposed to be like being a student again?? I feel so stupid and slow with everything I do, and I just can't picture myself being as confident and proficient as these nurses I work with. Just basic things, I go in there to take vitals and flush an IV and I'm so busy with the tasks that I am trying to do that I haven't even asked the patient how they're doing! I think I'm a good nurse, and I love being a nurse, but I feel so defined by having been fired. Like It's a scar I can never cover up. I went to graduation and walked this weekend (I "graduated" in december without the rest of my class - I walked with the class behind me) - I couldn't feel proud of myself like everyone else was - I hoped no one would ask me what I've been doing since december. I finally got my depression and anxiety under control with the help of accupuncture (I am finally med-free!! ) - so I feel ready to handle working again despite being unsure of myself. I know it takes that magic "year" to feel ok about being a nurse, but every day I ask myself if maybe they were right, and I am not a good nurse? What do I know about whether I'm a good nurse or not?
    Sorry I'm going on an on. My family thinks I'm pretty much over it, but the scab got knocked off this weekend at graduation.
    Thanks for your advice, and thankyou to anyone who prayed for me when I originally wrote about losing my job.
    -L.

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