I would like to work in labor and delivery. What should I specialize in?

  1. 0
    Hello, I'm planning to get a masters degree as a nurse practitioner. I would like to work in labor and deliver and Im not sure if i should specialize in neonatology or obstetrics and gynecology. Does anyone what employers would prefer?? And I have no idea what colleges would offer these specific degrees in Indiana???
    Thanks!! :spin:

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  2. 7 Comments...

  3. 1
    If you want to work in L&D, you should study/specialize in obstetrics and gynecology. Neonatology is what you would study/specialize in if you wanted to work in a newborn nursery or the NICU. Generally, L&D nurses do not care for the babies, nursery/postpartum nurses or NICU nurses do. Hope this helps.
    tewdles likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from Stacy in North Texas
    If you want to work in L&D, you should study/specialize in obstetrics and gynecology. Neonatology is what you would study/specialize in if you wanted to work in a newborn nursery or the NICU. Generally, L&D nurses do not care for the babies, nursery/postpartum nurses or NICU nurses do. Hope this helps.
    I agree that nurse practitioners do need to specialize in either OB or Neonatology. Howevery, at many hospitals, L&D nurses DO also take care of babies. They are the ones that take care of the baby immediately after delivery and in LDRP's they care for the infant as well as mom. Also, many hospitals crosstrain their nurses in all areas so L&D nurses also work nursery and postpartum and vice versa. I work at two hospitals that cross train and interviewed at 3 others that crosstrained also. However, NICU nurses are more specialized for the premature or compromised infants.
    SouthernBelle14 likes this.
  5. 3
    If you want to catch babies, you want to be a certified nurse midwife (CNM), not an NP.
  6. 0
    I am in the Women's Health Nurse Practitioner (WHNP) program. I have always wanted to work in labor and delivery, but was never given the opportunity. If you want to work with delivering women, you probably should consider the Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) route. You can also work doing prenatal care as a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP). There is an FNP program at the Indiana University at Purdue (IUPUI) and a graduate program in nurse-midwifery at the University of Indiana. Most of these schools will have distance options where you can take classes via the internet and arrange clinicals in your own community. Good luck with whatever you decide!

    Wendy
    Last edit by Elvish on Dec 8, '09 : Reason: removing posted link
  7. 0
    thanks! that helped alot. I would like to have the option to either deliver babies or work with the mother and baby before and after delivery. I think that the CNM looks like the best choice for me if I do end up specializing in this area.
    Im not familiar with the University of Indiana..did u mean Indiana University (IU) or University of Indianapolis? They are all so similar
  8. 0
    CNMs still see women prenatally. I followed one for a day when I was doing my OB clinical this fall and she took office visits. Also saw gyn patients too. I liked that aspect, and was happy to observe her in that role because I've been debating whether to continue on my education as a NP is Obstetrics/Gynecology, or go for my CNM.
  9. 0
    Does anyone know how often CNM's are hired in L & D at hospitals? Specifically in Indiana?


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