How do I get my foot in the OB door? - page 2

I have always wanted to be a labor and delivery nurse or CNM, but I quit school after completing one semester of general ed. (I was still 17 and lost :chair: ).....EIGHT YEARS LATER..... I applied to... Read More

  1. by   USA987
    Our OB Techs have their CNA license but they are trained specifically to OB. Up in L&D they really don't get to do a lot of hands on care...they stock the rooms, pick up pts. from the er, etc. If we are really busy they will bathe the baby after delivery. They are, however, very unique to a CNA in that they are trained in the OR to scrub in on c-sections, tubal ligations, etc.

    Most of our techs are currently in nursing school. I'd say 70% of them want to work in L&D or the NICU after they graduate. Unfortunately, our department only has one opening, so many of them will have to look elsewhere.

    Good luck to you!
  2. by   mitchsmom
    My two small local hospitals do hire new grads but we are great need. I think it just depends on the area & level of shortage so look and ask around different areas.

    I think you're on the right track with volunteering or working somehow in the area. As far as the lactation consultants and the credentialing concerns posted above, as long as they have the need/desire I would think you could assist somehow even if you couldn't actually do the consulting work, same as you'd volunteer in any other hospital area. It seems like a lot of IBCLC's I know stay pretty busy so maybe you could help even if it is just clerical or whatever & you'd still get to learn from being in the hospital environment, plus making contacts. Good luck
  3. by   Cassandre'
    Thank you all for your advice.

    To answer the questions you had;
    I am starting pre-nursing in May, Hopefully at the University (I don't know if they have accepted me yet, if not then I will be ging to the Community college for AAS then transfer to the U to continue education)
    I have worked in a Dr's office, training as a MA, and have assisted in minor surgeries. The first surgery I assisted was hard for me to stomach, but it got easier. I know it is completely different from L&D but that is the only experience I have now. I really enjoyed working with the patients and expect to feel the same about the patients in the hospital.
    What scared me at the nursing home was I had patients tell me they were waiting to die, they refused to eat and did not want me to assist them. I thought to be a CNA I had to work in a nursing home. Remember I was only 16 at the time. I have always kicked myself in the butt for not at least looking into CNA after I certified.
    One of the reasons I want to get a job at the hospital hopefully in L&D area before I finish school is so that I can get a feel for the hospital atmosphere and see if that is for me. L&D is something I have wanted since I was in Jr. High school but my only experience is when I had my son. Even if I were to get a job as L&D receptionist I feel that I would have a better knokwledge of what to expect in that unit. I understand there is so much to learn it is such a specialized unit. The miracle of birth is so amazing to me and I would love to help the mommies to have a wonderful experience. When I had my son I was enduced (silly me, I won't opt for that again) I was there for 24 hrs before my son was born and I was so greatful I ended up with the same nurse that I started out with, she was absolutely the best I could have ever asked for I know she made a huge difference in the delivery.
  4. by   WhatToDo
    My understanding of one-year BSN programs is that universities are packing in all of the classes that are part of a traditional 2 year BSN program in one year (or slightly more, my program is 13.5 months long).

    The requirements are no different. My program requires to summers worth of courses and they even pack in a class or two during holiday break!

    I must say, I'm nervous about how crazy it will be! Oh well, at least they don't let you work at the same time.
  5. by   jzprple
    I'm 6 months from graduating from an accelerated program myself and while it is definitely crazy crazy hours and lots of tests/projects/clinical hours. It's so worth it! I've only had to take off a year of work to get a brand new career and it's amazing how much you can actually learn when you push yourself this hard. Don't worry about it..I was freaking out last Aug. but now I'm comfortable with the program and I swear it's not as bad as everyone makes it out to be. I've heard that any BSN program grad may have "less" clinical experience than an ASN grad but I can't believe that I've lost any experiences b/c I did it this quick. You'll be great! Good luck!!

    Quote from WhatToDo
    My understanding of one-year BSN programs is that universities are packing in all of the classes that are part of a traditional 2 year BSN program in one year (or slightly more, my program is 13.5 months long).

    The requirements are no different. My program requires to summers worth of courses and they even pack in a class or two during holiday break!

    I must say, I'm nervous about how crazy it will be! Oh well, at least they don't let you work at the same time.

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