Evidence based practice for newborn care - page 2

by babynurse428

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Hi! I am looking for some information. A friend of mine is doing some research to help change the way they do things at their hospital's newborn nursery. She needs information on first baths (what to wash with), cord care... Read More


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    Boston Medical Center did a study a short time ago about the effect of delayed bathing on breastfeeding rates. It would seem (and I'm sure this will be replicated) that delaying the bath until around 12 hours has a positive impact on breastfeeding. My hospital (also in Boston, so we have to compete you know) is working on this, instead of "get your warm enough temps and hose'em down!"

    Breastfeeding Medicine. October 2011, 6(S1): S-1-S-24. doi:10.1089/bfm.2011.9985.
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    I wait 24 hours for bathing to promote breastfeeding; unless the parents ask for a bath sooner, the kid is covered head to toe with Mec (usually soap on the hair but clean water on body). The only time I do a bath right away without question when stable (with soap head to toe) is if the mom is HIV or Hep C positive.

    We do BGs for insulin dependent moms on a 24 hr schedule then PRN. GDM, LGA, SGA, stressed infants, and those with symptoms of hypoglycemia get BG X3 before feelings.

    Most of our parents breastfeed, we just stick the kid on the breast, no D5W ( why are you doing that anyway?). If they are going to bottle feed then I do a few CCs of sterile water first; but this is very rare, most of the moms that do rarely bottle feed breastfeed too.

    We teach alcohol on cords as well as natural drying
    Last edit by HeartsOpenWide on Nov 20, '12
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    Alcohol on cords is no longer recommended, nor is it superior in any way to natural drying. It actually prolongs the drying time in a statistically significant manner. My facility actually has a check box on our assessment form for cord care that some nurses do check off, I can only assume they are swabbing it with alcohol. Some old habits die hard.

    Dore, S., Buchan, D., Coulas, S., Hamber, L., Stewart, M., Cowan, D., & Jamieson, L. (1998). Alcohol Versus Natural Drying for Newborn Cord Care. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing, 27(6), 621–627. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1552-6909.1998.tb02631.x

    Also, here's an evidence-based review from the University of San Francisco's DNP program - http://repository.usfca.edu/cgi/view...06&context=dnp
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    duplicate message deleted.
    Last edit by nicuguy on Nov 20, '12 : Reason: duplicate message
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    Quote from nicuguy
    Alcohol on cords is no longer recommended, nor is it superior in any way to natural drying. It actually prolongs the drying time in a statistically significant manner. My facility actually has a check box on our assessment form for cord care that some nurses do check off, I can only assume they are swabbing it with alcohol. Some old habits die hard.

    Dore, S., Buchan, D., Coulas, S., Hamber, L., Stewart, M., Cowan, D., & Jamieson, L. (1998). Alcohol Versus Natural Drying for Newborn Cord Care. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing, 27(6), 621–627. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1552-6909.1998.tb02631.x

    Also, here's an evidence-based review from the University of San Francisco's DNP program - http://repository.usfca.edu/cgi/view...06&context=dnp
    We only still mention alcohol fir cord care because of one our peds. I teach both because its policy to talk about alcohol; but I mention research in favor of natural drying and sterile water when discussing cord a care with my patents. Thanks for your links.


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