A question for any nicu nurses.

  1. 0
    I have an interview soon for NICU Nurse. I'm an adult nurse with no nicu experience.

    I was wondering if anyone knows of any current challenges, research, or developments within the nicu setting that I can bring into my interview? Even if it is just something to mention in a question to the interview panel.
    I can think of things to say for the area I'm currently in. I've had a look at policy and guidelines and found things about the jaundice pathway but I'm struggling to get an insight into the current drives and practice focus of the nicu care setting.

    Thank you in advance for any suggestions you might have.
  2. Get our hottest nursing topics delivered to your inbox.

  3. 1,414 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  4. 9 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    Sunshine I would love to help but know absolutely nothing about NICU
    Sun*shine likes this.
  6. 0
    Hi sunshineI am a adult trained nurse that changed from adult ICU to neonates 2 years ago. I love my job It may be useful to look at the department of health neonatal toolkit. This is the linkhttp://www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/groups/dh_digitalassets/@dh/@en/@ps/@sta/@perf/documents/digitalasset/dh_108435.pdfCurrent research in neonates is placing babies on cpap following admits ration of curosurf (surfactant). Also the new neonatal life support guidelines are to allow babies to stay attached to cord for 1 min following delivery. There are also honey dressing trials and i2s2 which is giving babies ioDine https://www.npeu.ox.ac.uk/i2s2. There are also recent changes to how we do the blood spot screening. I wouldn't get yourself weighed down with loads of information just knowing about the neonatal toolkit will impress them and if you can explain what it is and how it effects the care given to neonates. BAPM give standards for neonatal care http://www.bapm.org/publications/doc...ndards.pdfThey will ask about what you feel you can bring to the job. Remember that neonates is very different to adults and paeds. There is extensive training given on site. They should give you competency to complete. Look at universities linked to the hospital and look at neonatal courses you will be expected to complete this. The NMC are looking at making neonatal qualification an add on to the normal registration (extended role). I hope this helps you outLet me know if you would like any more info, I am just completing my masters on neonatal care domi have lots of recent info. Take care Gemma
  7. 0
    Hi sunshineI am a adult trained nurse that changed from adult ICU to neonates 2 years ago. I love my job It may be useful to look at the department of health neonatal toolkit. This is the link http://www.dh.gov.uk/prod_consum_dh/.../dh_108435.pdf Current research in neonates is placing babies on cpap following admits ration of curosurf (surfactant). Also the new neonatal life support guidelines are to allow babies to stay attached to cord for 1 min following delivery. There are also honey dressing trials and i2s2 which is giving babies ioDine https://www.npeu.ox.ac.uk/i2s2. There are also recent changes to how we do the blood spot screening. I wouldn't get yourself weighed down with loads of information just knowing about the neonatal toolkit will impress them and if you can explain what it is and how it effects the care given to neonates. BAPM give standards for neonatal care http://www.bapm.org/publications/doc...ndards.pdf They will ask about what you feel you can bring to the job. Remember that neonates is very different to adults and paeds. There is extensive training given on site. They should give you competency to complete. Look at universities linked to the hospital and look at neonatal courses you will be expected to complete this. The NMC are looking at making neonatal qualification an add on to the normal registration (extended role). I hope this helps you outLet me know if you would like any more info, I am just completing my masters on neonatal care domi have lots of recent info. Take care Gemma
  8. 0
    Sorry had to post again so links would work for you
  9. 0
    XB9S me too haha . Gem, wow...thank you so much!! That reply blew me away. All this information is wonderful, and I'd never have found that on my own. Good luck with your masters. I'd love one day to do my masters in nicu.

    Best get the kettle on and start reading.
  10. 0
    No problem sunshine. Neonates is a really nice job. What type of unit have you applied (level 3 surgical etc)Let me know how you get on Gemma 😃
  11. 0
    Hi Sunshine

    One of the main issues in neonatal care currently is the issue of cost-saving and how that effects care delivery - with the aim of care being 1:1 for ic, 1:2 for hd and 1:4 for sc. I had my interview for neonates almost 4 years and there was a question surrounding this - and it is even more prominant in the news at the moment. Bliss have some good publications regarding this, and also there was a recent article in the guardian (i think!).
  12. 0
    Thanks Raye! I'll add Bliss to my reading list. Are the current levels of care 1:2 hd and 1:4 sc, or is this a new aim? Will this mean less staff or more staff per infant?

    The unit I'm applying to is Level 2 and Level 3. It's a specialist centre and it has medical and surgical level 3. I'm not sure if I'll be based in a particular unit, or if staff rotate. But anything with 'neonatal' above the door will be just fine with me.
  13. 0
    In my unit we currently work at 1:2 intensive care and 1:3-4 in special care. This can be different in every unit. I know a friend works in a unit that currently work with 1:6 in special care. It is wanted to be 1:1 in intensive care like adults. It would essentially mean more staff on the unit. But with cut backs I don't think this is going to be achieved.I know a few hospitals are starting to train clinical support workers to band 4 level and been said will have a role like the old enrolled nurses. There are a lot of different things going on at the moment. Neonates is the most progressing care setting a hospital.


Top