What books do you have on your desk? What books do you have on your desk? - pg.2 | allnurses

What books do you have on your desk? - page 3

you do not have to break the bank to have a decent working library. for your first couple of years of practice you'll probably be fine with your med/surg texts and other references from school to... Read More

  1. Visit  DIVINELY FAVORED profile page
    #13 1
    I have 50 shades of grey ( I love this book!!!!) Can't wait until I start 50 shades darker.

    Nursing: Medical Surgical Nursing by Lemone, Burk and Bauldoff
    Review and Rationals Med surg
    Med surg Test Success
    Med Surg Pocket Clinical Guide
    Med surg made incredibly easy
    Saunders Nclex Review ( yellow cover)
    Maternal Newborn and Women's Health
    Maternal Newborn Test success
    Pathophysiology
    Laboratory and Diagnostics by Joyce Keyes
    Maternal Newborn Reviews and Rationales
    Tabers Medical Dictionary
    Nursing Pharmacology
    Bible
    Hesi Review
    Health Assessment w/ clinical guide
    Across Lifespan CarePlans
    Fundamentals ( gave away)
    Davis Drug Book
    Med Math
    I realize I have a small fortune in nursing books alone
  2. Visit  katiebear profile page
    #14 1
    I have a small bookshelf totally loaded with nursing books, but the ones that are on the top shelf and I use the most are:

    Tabers. Don't ever go anywhere without your Tabers.
    Davis Drug Guide
    Hogan NCLEX Review book
    A nursing prayer book from the 40s that my grandmother gave me (who was a new nurse in the 40s)
    A nursing prayer book from last year (my dad bought it for me when I started nursing school)


    I use the main med-surg textbook a ton, as well, but that's not really a reference book since it's required reading. I also use my pharmacology book a fair amount, but it's usually in my car.
  3. Visit  ImKosher profile page
    #15 2
    If I have digital copies of Tabers and the Drug guide on the iPad do you think I should invest in a hard copy?

    **I've just added Saunder Nclex and Nanda-1 to my collection, again thanks to this topic.**
    Last edit by ImKosher on Jul 27, '12
  4. Visit  ImKosher profile page
    #16 1
    Quote from katiebear
    I have a small bookshelf totally loaded with nursing books, but the ones that are on the top shelf and I use the most are:

    Tabers. Don't ever go anywhere without your Tabers.
    Davis Drug Guide
    Hogan NCLEX Review book
    A nursing prayer book from the 40s that my grandmother gave me (who was a new nurse in the 40s)
    A nursing prayer book from last year (my dad bought it for me when I started nursing school)


    I use the main med-surg textbook a ton, as well, but that's not really a reference book since it's required reading. I also use my pharmacology book a fair amount, but it's usually in my car.
    The Nurse prayer book sounds amazing, you should share some that inspire or which you find interesting with us! It would be awesome to see a perspective from the 40's, now that's vintage.
  5. Visit  Frizbeeboy profile page
    #17 0
    I really like Intravenous Meds by Gahart its by Mosby

    Also like their Lab and Test Reference book

    For the ED I find the Tarascon ED version good because it is arranged by Condition/Problem

    I know the question was regarding what is on one's desk, but I always find that when I bring a book to work and try to reference it during the shift I end up forgetting to. It stays in the locker, or on the COW. Even pocket guides I have a habit of doing that. Another thread was mentioning putting references on your badge card which I have done and find helpful. I have a weight conversion badge card and pedi vital signs and milestones which are a big help. Not quite as extensive as a desk reference but they are sure are handy!
  6. Visit  on eagles wings profile page
    #18 0
    Quote from bfactivist
    "
    pharmacology for nursing care by lehne. it is such a huge book and it is not what was required for my pharm class but this book is 10 times better. "

    what's the best part about the pharm book? i'm always looking for extra references.
    first, it is just written so well. he uses a little humor. it's overwhelming at first when you see the book, but it's really an easy read. then what i really loved was that he really gives you a background before talking about meds, like he'll explain the patho and indications, not just list them. not as heavy as your med-surg textbook, but close enough so that you can really understand why you would give this med over another one.
    what i appreciated was he didn't dumb-down the information like my other pharm text did. he really explained the patho and pharmacokinetics thoroughly but in a way that we as nursing students would understand.
  7. Visit  on eagles wings profile page
    #19 0
    i just got another book today which i am so excited about, lol.

    amazon.com: clinical pathophysiology made ridiculously simple (9780940780804): aaron berkowitz: bookso technically, i think the book was written with med-students in mind but it is totally nursing student friendly. :-) just read the first review on the text from amazon:

    "i am a nursing student who learns things by understanding them on a deep level (causes, patterns, connections) rather than by memorizing isolated fragments. so this book is excellent for someone like me.

    unlike the assigned textbook for pathophysiology, this book begins its survey of the clinical problems that can affect each body system with a "big picture" preview--and always in the simplest, clearest language possible. here, for instance, is how the pulmonary system chapter begins: "what problems could affect the alveolar sac and/or airways? 1. the sac is already filled with something other than air. 2. the sac does not open adequately. 3. the sac is unable to expire adequately due to either obstruction of the airways or decreased elastic recoil of the sac itself." the rest of the chapter simply fills in the details of these three possibilities.
    moreover, the book is filled with extremely useful devices for remembering and organizing the information presented. there are on virtually every page very clear diagrams, pictures, or formulas that capture a central concept in a memorable figure. for instance, a figure depicting the renal system, with blood supply, nephron, and collecting system (ureter, etc) uses little pointing hands to show the classification of kinds of acute renal failure: prerenal, intrinsic, and postrenal. second, the book has many helpful mnemonics. for instance, "aldosterone causes reabsorption of na (sodium)."
    finally, the book provides detailed but wonderfully clear and simple explanations of virtually every pathophysiological problem, including many of the major diagnostics for distinguishing them. moreover, it frequently uses questions in the text to give the reader a chance to think about the problem. for instance, in discussing hyperthryroidism, the author points out the two main mechanisms: "the thyroid over-secretes thyroid hormone (primary) or the pituitary over-stimulates the thyroid to secrete thyroid hormone (secondary). one needs only one lab value to distinguish between primary and secondary hyperthyroidism. which one? think about negative feedback. if the thyroid itself secretes lots of hormone 'without being told to,' this would increase negative feedback on the pituitary. so in primary hyperthyroidism tsh will be low."
    plainly, one cannot come to this book without an adequate background in basic anatomy and physiology. nor does the book presume to provide detailed coverage of everything, as guyton and hall do. but it is the best short overview of pathophysiology i have ever seen, and it helped me tremendously in understanding and therefore thinking critically about clinical problems."
  8. Visit  jt43 profile page
    #20 0
    Martini's Visual Anatomy & Physiology. This book was published after I took A&P, but I bought it anyway because it's just so well organized and laid out. Also, I couldn't wait to throw away Marieb--that book was horribly written imo. I've found Visual A&P it to be an excellent reference. My only complaint is that the cardiac chapters are a little light. I also have Martini's Atlas.

    Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine. Because sometimes I just want to know more. This is my guilty pleasure and I have to be careful when I use it. It's like the internet for me distraction-wise. I go to look something specific up and then I say, "Hey, look at this...Ooo, I want to look that up too," and suddenly I find that time has warped around me and it's 4 hours later.

    Lehne's Pharmacology for Nursing Care.

    Kee's Laboratory and Diagnositc Tests with Nursing Implications.

    Nursing Diagnosis Handbook.

    Davis's Drug Guide.

    APA Style Manual

    Taylor's Clinical Nursing Skills. This little gem came with my Fundamental's textbook. Skills, skills, and more skills...all organized with steps and what to do if...Plus it has a DVD.

    Jarvis's Physical Examination & Health Assessment. I love how this book was written (one of the few nursing texts I can say that about). It's not verbose, it's well organized, it does a great job listing "normal" and deviations, has photos and special sections for elderly, peds, women, etc.

    I'm undecided about a medical dictionary (which one, what edition, print or e-book). Any suggestions with rationales are welcome.
  9. Visit  Sorin profile page
    #21 1
    Too lazy to type them all up but here lol.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/d41hiffpit...805_211758.jpg

    Yes that is oatmeal. This doesn't even touch the online resources available also lol.

close