Care planning decreased cardiac output - page 4

by allie86, BSN, MSN, RN | 8,170 Views | 38 Comments

HI! I was hoping someone could help me out with this care plan I have. I have spent hours and trolled the internet for answers to no avail! BTW I am a 2nd semester RN student! My patient is a young man with an ejection... Read More


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    Love it. If you read closely, you see how monitoring gets considered and applied, not just done.
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    ejection fraction more often requires long term medication, as in taking maintenance meds, due to pre existing condition indicated in pt's history, your expected EO for this is to educate patient on his condition, advise on proper taking of maintenance meds, ejection fraction can be considered as a symptom here related to his other pre existing conditions, when patient was admitted, he probably was having a heart or anxiety attack.....
  3. 1
    Oh thank you so much. This was very informative. I also use Ackley! I like it but I just was confused on how to use EF. I winded up changing it after the input from here! Thanks again!
    Esme12 likes this.
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    Quote from Esme12
    Here is a partial list of nursing interventions for decreased cardiac output.............Ackley: Nursing Diagnosis Handbook, 10th Edition
    2002).
    Thank you I use Ackley too. I got some good NI from here but had to change my EO. I just took out the EF and used DOE and c/o fatigue... We worked on improving that in my NI. Thanks again
    Esme12 likes this.
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    Quote from R. Obias Jr., R.N.
    ejection fraction more often requires long term medication, as in taking maintenance meds, due to pre existing condition indicated in pt's history, your expected EO for this is to educate patient on his condition, advise on proper taking of maintenance meds, ejection fraction can be considered as a symptom here related to his other pre existing conditions, when patient was admitted, he probably was having a heart or anxiety attack.....
    Thank you. Yes that I what I did instead. Having EF as a AMB was too difficult. IN my program anything and everything in the AMB has to be addressed and made into an EO. I just didnt see how EF could be improved in a short term goal so I replaced it with other evidence.
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    I hear what your saying. However, our program tells us to do it this way. Trust if it was up to me I would do it much different. We ALWAYS have to assess for our EO first and monitor teach and treat. Thats what they want and since I am the student and not the instructor....I must follow! I know many nursing programs are different and these instructors all have their preferred ways. I definitely use my NANADA list. They only allow us to use a select few and in my case here, I was told to use decreased cardiac output. On the contrary I think I really do think like a nurse I have always thought critically. In class its a different method. Not so critically but how they want us to learn. Im ok with that. I dont mind learning and I thank you for your input too. Just want you to know that this way is one of many that some school teach...whether its good or not.
    Quote from GrnTea
    These "interventions" are not interventions. Assessment and monitoring are not interventions; implementing parts of the medical plan of care are not nursing interventions. Interventions make a difference in something; monitoring and assessment (including reviewing diagnostic imaging) are not actions that change a thing.

    You have almost nothing here about nursing assessment.

    I just wrote a fairly detailed critique of care plan for someone with a patient who has CHF. You might want to look at that. Briefly, I think you are thinking about medical diagnosis, interventions, and assessments. You need to look to your NANDA-I 2012-2014 to identify the defining characteristics allowing you to make nursing diagnoses; once you have done that, the way to developing a nursing plan of care based on nursing assessment and interventions will become clearer to you. It's $29 at Amazon, free two-day delivery for students; $24 on your Kindle. Get it stat.

    This exercise is to help you learn to think like a nurse. Not there yet.
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    Yes. Assessment is an individual intervention at my school too, and most schools I know. However, it is followed by a "do" and concluded with a "teach". Assessing is a nursing Dx that can be used singularly, it just won't have much usefulness if you don't follow up on it with implementation, reporting, or the like.

    At my school we use the ADDT framework for our nursing interventions for our nursing diagnosis.
    A-Assess
    D-Do
    D-Do
    T-Teach

    Our intervention must follow that framework where appropriate.
    allie86 likes this.
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    Assessing is not a nursing diagnosis. You will not find one nursing diagnosis that is "Assess xyz."


    "Assessing is a nursing Dx that can be used singularly, it just won't have much usefulness if you don't follow up on it with implementation, reporting, or the like."
  9. 2
    Quote from GrnTea
    Assessing is not a nursing diagnosis. You will not find one nursing diagnosis that is "Assess xyz."

    "Assessing is a nursing Dx that can be used singularly, it just won't have much usefulness if you don't follow up on it with implementation, reporting, or the like."
    Sorry. I meant to put intervention. Didn't mean Dx.
    GrnTea and Esme12 like this.


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