** Help with a Simple Care Plan **

  1. 0
    I just started my 1st semester a couple weeks ago, and we have our 1st practice care plan. Not sure if this is the kind we'll be using in clinicals, but it seems simple... so I'm guessing not :P
    Anyway, we were given a list of 4 Nursing Diagnosis to choose from... and I chose this one:

    Feeding Self-Care Deficit related to muscular weakness on left side and cognitive deficit secondary to previous stroke (CVA) as evidenced by inability to cut food or open packages.

    I need to know:

    3 Outcomes
    4 Interventions
    Rationales for each Intervention
    Effectiveness of Each Intervention

    I need help with one more outcome and one more intervention with rationale and effectiveness.

    If you could throw out some ideas, i would REALLY appreciate it. It's not something that's graded, but getting some nurses perspective on this would be very helpful I think Thanks in advance!

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  2. 0
    It seems that most people that post here don't tend to jump to provide answers. Why don't you tell us what you have come up with so far, and I'm sure some people will offer pointers.
  3. 2
    cooliegirl and Sl1011 like this.
  4. 0
    Quote from NurseKatie08
    It seems that most people that post here don't tend to jump to provide answers. Why don't you tell us what you have come up with so far, and I'm sure some people will offer pointers.
    I put as a broad goal:
    To maintain mobility on right side and to encourage use of call light.

    Outcomes:
    1) Patient will do AROM on Rt side and assist with PROM on Lt side for 10 mins
    2) Patient will keep call light within reach and use it to ask for assistance with cutting food and opening packages
    3) ?????? *NEED HELP WITH*

    Interventions:
    1) Make sure patient's call light is easily attainable to call for help. (Put at bedside table or on bed with patient)
    2) Open Patient's packages and cut food when trays are passed out at meal-time.
    3) Assess willingness to participate in ROM & ability in ROM.
    4) ?????? *NEED HELP WITH*

    Rationale: (match up with interventions)
    1) Patient will not have to attempt opening packages and cutting food with difficulty, and he will not have to wait long if the call light is used.
    2) Patient can eat right away, will not have to use call light and wait for a nurse to come.
    3) Keep movement in his Lt arm, move his Rt are to keep active to feed self and use call light.
    4) ?????? (No intervention yet)

    Please help me with this.... and if I'm wrong with what I wrote or if there is a better way to write it, I would appreciate the input. This is my first time even attempting a careplan, and I'm a bit lost. Thanks
  5. 0
    Thread moved to Nursing Student Assistance Forum for better exposure. You should receive more responses here.
  6. 1
    The way I learned, it, your goal is supposed to be opposite of your problem, ie: The patient will demonstrate increased ability to feed self or report when s/he needs assistance.

    Personally, although ROM exercises are a good thing for the patient's health, I think their deficit is going to be permanent, so your patient if going to need to learn long-term solutions to their eating problems, such as the use of assistive devices as needed, and making food choices that will enable them the maximum amount of independence while ensuring maximum nutritional status.

    In other words, *teaching* may play a large role in your interventions.
    Sl1011 likes this.
  7. 3
    well, this is very confusing. the nursing diagnosis you chose was: feeding self-care deficit related to muscular weakness on left side and cognitive deficit secondary to previous stroke (cva) as evidenced by inability to cut food or open packages.

    i started looking at your broad goal: to maintain mobility on right side and to encourage use of call light. i had to go back to your diagnostic statement to see if i had read it correctly. the inability to cut food or open packages has absolutely nothing to do with maintaining mobility on the right side or using the call light! not only that, but the definition of the feeding self-care deficit is as follows: impaired ability to perform or complete feeding activities (page 185, nanda-i nursing diagnoses: definitions & classification 2007-2008). using a call light is not a feeding activity. mobility has to do with movement and the diagnosis of impaired physical mobility. it is inappropriate to use it with self-deficit.
    interventions:
    1) make sure patient's call light is easily attainable to call for help. (put at bedside table or on bed with patient) - this has nothing to do with assisting the patient with eating
    2) open patient's packages and cut food when trays are passed out at meal-time.
    3) assess willingness to participate in rom & ability in rom. - this has absolutely nothing to do with assisting the patient with eating
    4) ?????? *need help with*

    rationale: (match up with interventions)
    1) patient will not have to attempt opening packages and cutting food with difficulty, and he will not have to wait long if the call light is used. - this is not the rationale for putting a callbell within a patient's reach
    2) patient can eat right away, will not have to use call light and wait for a nurse to come. - why are you opening packages and cutting food for the patient? because he cannot do it for himself.
    3) keep movement in his lt arm, move his rt are to keep active to feed self and use call light.
    4) ?????? (no intervention yet)
    outcomes are your predicted results based upon treating the cause of the problem as well as the symptoms of it and based upon the interventions that you order. i notice you are told the patient's deficit is due to muscular weakness and cognitive deficit because of a stroke. can these be reversed? or, are stroke residuals permanent? do you understand what a cognitive deficit means? it limits the patient's understanding because there was brain damage. not everything is curable. damage from strokes is not usually curable so we work to maintain whatever function the patient does have.

    when care planning it is best to work with the nursing process. tear the nursing diagnosis down into its component parts:
    • problem: feeding self-care deficit (inability to perform or complete feeding activities)
    • etiology: muscular weakness on left side and cognitive deficit (this was due to a previous stroke)
    • symptoms: inability to cut food or open packages
    the symptoms are what were found during the assessment of the patient. knowledge about strokes is also what you would have learned during assessment as well
    you need to be aware that people who have had strokes may also have issues not only with bringing the food up to their mouth physically (that's the left sided muscular weakness referred to in the "related to" part of the nursing diagnostic statement) but also with opening their mouth, and chewing since all these activities involve muscles of feeding that may be weakened or damaged from the stroke. if the patient cannot open their mouth wide enough food must be cut up so it is small enough for them to get it into their mouth. they may not be able to chew larger chunks of food enough to make them smaller before swallowing. rom exercises are not going to correct these problems, especially when the stroke happened "previously". what you are left with is to treat the symptoms
    • can't cut up food
    • can't open packages
    we know there is a left side weakness, but how about the right side? can the patient hold utensils in the right hand? can we have the kitchen send food that is already chopped or soft so the patient merely needs to pick it up with a spoon? there are devices that can be placed around the edge of plates to help patients scoop food onto utensils so it doesn't get pushed off the dish when they are trying to get food onto a spoon or fork. we want to assist the patient to do as much for himself as possible and not do everything for them. we can ask the kitchen to put milk and fluids in a glass rather than send them in individual packages. yes, there are some things that will need to be opened. yes, we will need to make sure that utensils and glasses are placed at the patient's right side where he can reach them easily.

    are you getting what i am saying?

    outcome. . .patient will eat more at meals, will be more independent in eating, will eat safely

    effectiveness. . .how do you know the interventions are working? assess for those symptoms or degree of them to continue occurring. is there still a problem with cutting up food? how much of a problem is it now? is there still a problem opening packages? to what extent?

    do you see how we go from the problem to solutions to checking to see if the solutions are working? to come up with solutions you have to know what you are dealing with. go to mcdonalds and order something. put your hand behind your back and try to eat it. pretend that you are 6 years old and don't have the capacity to problem solve. take notes. try to eat a bowl of soup with one hand behind your back. again, pretend that you are brain damaged and don't have the capacity to figure out how to get the soup from the bowl to your mouth with your bad arm. take notes. you will get an idea of the kind of challenges a cva patient faces.

    please, rewrite your interventions, outcomes and rationales. rationales are why we do something. when writing the rationales say to yourself, "the reason i am doing this intervention is because. . ."
    starz_girl_1, Sl1011, and cooliegirl like this.
  8. 0
    [quote=daytonite;3395245]


    okay, i went back and erased everything and started over. i used the outcomes that you listed to get me going, and i went through my book for more help understanding what i am supposed to be doing. i think this new one might be a little better, but i'm still shaky on the rationales and effectiveness interventions. how are you supposed to know the effectiveness interventions if this patient isn't real? make it up? that's what i did anyway please give me more feedback when you have a chance, you are a great help!!!!

    nursing diagnosis: feeding self-care deficit related to muscular weakness on left side and cognitive deficit secondary to previous stroke (cva) as evidenced by inability to cut food or open packages.

    broad goal: maximize independence of the patient with self-feeding

    outcomes:
    1) patient will eat food safely
    2) patient will be more independent in eating meals
    3) patient will eat more at meals

    nic:
    1) encourage patient to feed self as soon as possible. assist with setup as needed.
    - rationale: this would encourage more independence sooner with self-feeding.
    - effectiveness: patient is doing well self-feeding more independently. does not need much assistance.
    2) make sure food/diet is appropriate for the patient to chew & swallow; very small bites or pureed diet
    - rationale: due to the stroke, patient may have difficulty opening mouth, chewing, and swallowing.
    - effectiveness: the patient is able to eat more food, because the diet is easy to chew and swallow.
    3) provide patient with proper utensils/adaptive devices to help with self-feeding; possibly including nonspill cups and stabilized plates.
    - rationale: proper utensils may assist patient in maximizing independent care.
    - effectiveness: the adaptive devices helped patient be more successful eating meals independently.
    4) make sure patient is in the best position for eating, such as in a chair. provide support for arm, elbows, and wrist.
    - rationale: being in a chair or proper upright position will be more comfortable for the patient to access his meal properly.
    - effectiveness: patient felt comfortable sitting up eating, and was able to get to his meal with more ease due to good positioning.
  9. 0
    nursing diagnosis: feeding self-care deficit related to muscular weakness on left side and cognitive deficit secondary to previous stroke (cva) as evidenced by inability to cut food or open packages.

    broad goal: maximize independence of the patient when eating.

    outcomes:
    1) patient will eat food safely.
    2) patient will be more independent when eating meals
    3) patient will consume more food at meals

    nic:
    1. prepare food before patient begins eating by cutting it into smaller pieces that will fit into his mouth and opening all containers and placing them at the patient's right side.
    - rationale: preparing items for the patient provides support while allowing patient the opportunity to do as much as possible for himself.
    - effectiveness:
    2. contact the dietician and ask that a mechanical soft diet be sent to the patient.
    - rationale: mechanical soft foods allow for less energy expenditure required to cut up on the plate and to chew.
    - effectiveness:
    3) provide patient with adaptive devices for eating such as plate guards, nonspill cups and plate stabilizers.
    - rationale: proper eating equipment increases the patient's independence.
    - effectiveness: the addition of a plate guard helped patient be more successful in scooping food onto spoons and forks when eating.
    4) make sure utensils and cups are within reach of the patient's right arm and encourage patient to eat using the right arm.
    - rationale: this allows independence and increases a sense of self-esteem.
    - effectiveness: patient felt comfortable eating, and was able to eat to his meal with more ease.
  10. 0
    I am studying objectives I will face in school. This was an excellent opportunity to look at the subject, the advances throughout the messages that was presented from advanced nurses to just learning. With a little insight I feel that s1011 did a great job in reassessing the situation. When I first read her care plan I thought that it sounded good. But then when Daytonite became critical and made her rethink the plan she did a great job expressing the care following the cva. I know I will look forward to working with you all as I challenge my self to a new career.


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