Your Style of Managing or Supervising

  1. 0
    If you are a supervisor or manager and you have an employee (the complainor) come to you and complain about another employee, how do you handle this?

    Do you seek out the view of the person who is complained about (the complainee) regarding this particular complaint?

    Do you not seek out the complainee's view but rather just keep mum, keep score, store the complaints, and wait for evaluation time to let the complainee know about the complaint(s)?

    If you do talk with the complainee, do you state clearly, specifically what the complaint is and help the worker figure out how to do better? (if the person's response doesn't dissuade you from thinking that the complainee is in the wrong or lacks knowledge or a certain skill) Or do you hide the identity of the complainor and the specific facts of the complaint that would allow the complainee to ID the situation and complainor and really address the exact complaint?


    Do you form an opinion of a particular subordinate based on what someone else has to say about him or her? Do you take time to observe and interact with the subordinate yourself to see and hear for yourself how that person behaves?

    Is your goal to coach your staff, help them work together, help them develop as professionals? Or is your goal to collect your check with the minimum amount of fuss?

    That would mean that you apply a policy, such as tardiness or absenteeism, dress code, or some other policy, equally to all staff, regardless of whether or not they've had a problem in a particular area (like excessive tardiness, calling off a lot on their weekend to work).

    Do you treat a worker who just about never calls off before or after their day off or on a holiday the same as a frequent violator? Do you consider that the reason someone isn't wearing the particular color of scrubs for your floor might be that he or she hasn't been able to afford to buy more than one set and has to buy maybe one set per paycheck or per month? If that's the reason, do you cut them some slack?

    Do you violate their privacy by discussing them in front of people who have no business knowing their business? Do you respect your subordinates? Do you like them, care about them? Or are they just a means to an end, that end being your accomplishing your job of running the ship well enough to keep your own neck out of the noose?

    Do you believe your staff when they call off sick? Or do you automatically believe that they are lying most of the time if not all of it?

    Thanks for any help.
  2. 1,611 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 4 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    If you are a supervisor or manager and you have an employee (the complainor) come to you and complain about another employee, how do you handle this?

    Do you seek out the view of the person who is complained about (the complainee) regarding this particular complaint?
    It depends on the complaint. If it's a complaint about personality, I'd try to figure out why the complainer is having an issue and where they want it to go. Do they just need to vent? Is it affecting their work? If it needs to be addressed with the other employee, I would encourage the complainer to speak to the other employee, or offer to mediate a discussion between the two.

    If it's a complaint about behavior (safety, ethics, etc.) or clinical skills, then I would address it with the other employee, but I would do so by maintaining the anonymity of the complainer. I would say that it was brought to my attention that there may be an issue in X area, and I would reiterate the policy and possibly ask the employee to demonstrate the skill in question.

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Do you not seek out the complainee's view but rather just keep mum, keep score, store the complaints, and wait for evaluation time to let the complainee know about the complaint(s)?
    If there was a complaint against the employee that would affect their evaluation, I would never let it reach evaluation time without being addressed. If the complaint is that serious that it would go on their permanent record, then it should be addressed as soon as it's brought to my attention. Failing to address a complaint that serious for any length of time would be a serious oversight on my part- and possibly put the safety of patient's/staff at risk.

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    If you do talk with the complainee, do you state clearly, specifically what the complaint is and help the worker figure out how to do better? (if the person's response doesn't dissuade you from thinking that the complainee is in the wrong or lacks knowledge or a certain skill) Or do you hide the identity of the complainor and the specific facts of the complaint that would allow the complainee to ID the situation and complainor and really address the exact complaint?
    I would be as specific as I need to be in order to make sure that the employee understands the complaint and I would help them work on a plan for improvement. I would never disclose the person that complained without consent of the complainer. In fairness to the employee being complained against, they need to know the situation that the complaint pertained to so they can share their side of the story or know exactly what behaviors/skills they need to address.

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Do you form an opinion of a particular subordinate based on what someone else has to say about him or her? Do you take time to observe and interact with the subordinate yourself to see and hear for yourself how that person behaves?
    No, I don't form an opinion based on one complaint. However, if it's a recurring pattern of complaints from multiple employees, it would make the complaints more credible. If I were receiving such negative feedback about one employee, I would certainly take it upon myself to speak with the employee and/or observe their behavior myself. (Although behavior is often different with a manager on the floor.)

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Is your goal to coach your staff, help them work together, help them develop as professionals? Or is your goal to collect your check with the minimum amount of fuss?
    Of course, I'd like to think every manager's goal is to make their team run as efficiently as possible. Indeed, helping your staff communicate, work together and develop is the best way to make sure that you have the minimum amount of fuss.

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    That would mean that you apply a policy, such as tardiness or absenteeism, dress code, or some other policy, equally to all staff, regardless of whether or not they've had a problem in a particular area (like excessive tardiness, calling off a lot on their weekend to work).
    Policies like these are written with a progressive level of discipline. The first infraction is usually a verbal warning. Then it progresses to written warning, suspension, and termination (depending on the type of infraction). So yes, the polices are applied equally to everyone. But someone who has had problems in a certain area will be subject to a higher level of discipline, based on the policy.

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Do you treat a worker who just about never calls off before or after their day off or on a holiday the same as a frequent violator? Do you consider that the reason someone isn't wearing the particular color of scrubs for your floor might be that he or she hasn't been able to afford to buy more than one set and has to buy maybe one set per paycheck or per month? If that's the reason, do you cut them some slack?
    I don't understand your questions about call-offs. My hospital considers call-offs on holidays to be more serious than a standard call out, and the employee is not allowed to use PTO for that day, so their paycheck will be short that week if they call off. They are also required to provide a doctor's note.

    My floor doesn't require a certain color of scrubs. If they did, and an employee was unable to afford new scrubs, they would need to discuss that with me and we would work out a solution. Otherwise, I would expect them to conform to the dress code. (But even one pair of scrubs can be washed between uses and worn regularly.)

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Do you violate their privacy by discussing them in front of people who have no business knowing their business? Do you respect your subordinates? Do you like them, care about them? Or are they just a means to an end, that end being your accomplishing your job of running the ship well enough to keep your own neck out of the noose?
    No, Yes, Yes, and No.

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Do you believe your staff when they call off sick? Or do you automatically believe that they are lying most of the time if not all of it?
    It doesn't matter what I think. The reason that an employee calls off is their personal business- not mine. If they have sick time in the bank, they are entitled to use it for whatever reason they need to- without disclosing that reason. Provided that they are not violating policy by frequent call-outs and are providing adequate notice before their shift, it's not my business why they are calling out. Obviously an employee who rarely calls out sick and then provides a doctor's note (required if the illness extends beyond three work days), it appears legitimate. If the employee calls out as much as they can without violating policy, and comes in to work the next day looking fine with a new hair cut and tan, I'd be suspicious, but again- as long as they aren't violating a policy then my opinion doesn't matter.
    Stephalump likes this.
  5. 0
    I really appreciate your taking the time to answer my many questions, Ashley. You sound like a good boss.

    Suppose the employee could provide you with proof of a legitimate, emergency sort of problem that caused the holiday call-off? Like maybe a transportation true emergency, a seriously sick or injured child or other person for whom the employee is responsible, or the worker being truly ill/injured, or some serious emergency with the worker's house, like a flooded basement due to sewage back-up, furnace failing in weather below 40 degrees, things of this nature? Would the person still not be able to use PTO? This is assuming the worker has never done this before or something like this happened 5 or so years ago.

    I don't quite get wanting to protect the identity of the complainer in some cases. Do you think the anonymity of the complainer should take priority over the right of the accused to face his or her accuser?

    To me, the best way would be to sit the parties down with the supervisor and hash out the complaint. I guess sparks might fly.
    Last edit by Kooky Korky on May 20, '12
  6. 0
    If someone feels strongly enough to report a problem to the supervisor they should be secure enough to have their name included in the complaint. Usually everyone knows who made the complaint anyway, and it shows accountability and professionalism to stand behind your accusations/concerns.
  7. 0
    Amen, Canoehead.


Top