Sorry Nurse Recruiters/Nurse Managers! - page 17

by Isitpossible

32,729 Views | 170 Comments

As I receive rejection after rejection for nursing jobs, I feel the need to apologize to nurse recruiters/managers who overlook my BSN because I lack patient care tech experience. I am sorry I could not afford to take a job as... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from That Guy
    It took me 34 minutes for 75 questions. I do not sit and dwell on the questions. I read the question, found the answer moved along. Worked well in school for me. I always always tested fast. I cant think about things too long. When I know the answer, I know it and dont think about what ifs.
    But like others said it doesnt mean anything. whether its every question over 6 hours or how fast others took it you still get the same license.
    It is a horrible thing to say but whether you took 34 minutes or three hours it does not matter. You got your license that matters. All the hard work, the anxiety, the sleepless nights all for a pass or fail test. Experience matters the most. In LPN school we used to cruse the regular staff for just sitting around while the students did all the work for 8 hours. But the 17 that were left in our class all had jobs when we graduated because we had the experience. I walked into a charge position in a national know hospital for heart and lung. I think what is wrong with the nursing schools of today. The Students only have a limited time on the floor. Now the GN's have proctoring, we had orientation. It is not the GN's fault. It is the school's
  2. 0
    Well, the difference between 20 minutes and 34 is huge, nearly twice the time; I've seen people claim the same before now.

    While I'm not saying it's impossible for the test to be done successfully in 20 minutes (or 25, as wooh said hers took), it's hard for me to picture, that's all. I understand not dwelling on questions, but I never understood racing through them, either....hell, it's the licensing exam, I know I took an extra minute here and there.

    So be it, I guess some people are super fast at it.
  3. 0
    Quote from Altra
    While I can fully appreciate that recent college grads have entered the job market at an extremely difficult time of recession (as have other college grads in fairly cyclical 20-year increments) I have to ask: is there this level of indignation among college grads who studied different fields? Are the sociology, history and English majors of the world placing blame for their lack of employment/underemployment on their school? Are marketing majors who are slinging coffee and scones at Starbucks theorizing that their current employment as baristas was all part of some evil master plan?
    My first degree was in elementary education, from one of the top education schools in the country. I was at the top of my class and I excelled in student teaching. But... no job. So, while I can't speak for everyone, I don't blame my school. I blame the nepotism that is rampant in the rural area in which I live.

    As far as new grads in home health: I have a question. In nursing school, I had about 10 (ugh!) home health rotations. In those rotations, here are the things I saw the nurses do:

    ~vital signs
    ~pre-pour meds
    ~talk to the patient
    ~draw blood
    ~finger sticks
    ~wound care

    What is it that requires prior experience in order to do home health? I am not trying to be a smart ***. I really am curious.

    Personally, I would feel strange putting my NCLEX question number and time on a resume but if people are doing that, is there a way to verify that?
    Last edit by CrazierThanYou on Apr 21, '12
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    Putting NCLEX time and question numbers on a resume is the height of foolishness and the best way to get the application tossed with nothing more than a laugh at the applicants expense. I hired nurses for critical care units for years and would never have interviewed anyone that did that. I still hire my own clinic nurse and same applies. I wouldn't give you the time of day. That is just the dumbest "credential" I have ever heard. Even "Who's Who in _____ " would be taken more seriously than that, lol.
    Wild Irish LPN, Meriwhen, Horseshoe, and 1 other like this.
  5. 1
    I guess I was unaware of what a "competition" completing your NCLEX was....kinda sad, I could care less....sorry.
    roser13 likes this.
  6. 1
    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    What is it that requires prior experience in order to do home health? I am not trying to be a smart ***. I really am curious.
    What happens when the home health pt codes and it's just you and your black bag? No code team, No doctors, No experienced nurses around to help. Sure, you could call 911, but while waiting for the ambulance you'd better be performing CPR...
    roser13 likes this.
  7. 1
    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    Personally, I would feel strange putting my NCLEX question number and time on a resume but if people are doing that, is there a way to verify that?
    Nope, not at all verifiable, even if it did make a difference to anyone hiring. Which is yet another reason why it's useless trivia.
    Horseshoe likes this.
  8. 1
    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Putting NCLEX time and question numbers on a resume is the height of foolishness and the best way to get the application tossed with nothing more than a laugh at the applicants expense. I hired nurses for critical care units for years and would never have interviewed anyone that did that. I still hire my own clinic nurse and same applies. I wouldn't give you the time of day. That is just the dumbest "credential" I have ever heard. Even "Who's Who in _____ " would be taken more seriously than that, lol.
    Yeah, I have never heard of anyone giving a rat's patoot about this until I read this thread. When my computer shut down after 75 questions during my NCLEX exam, I was so shocked, because I was so mentally involved in what I was doing that it took me totally by surprise. However, once I accepted that the test was actually truly over with, I never gave it another thought ever until I read this thread. Anyone who has worked any amount of time as a nurse should know that the number of questions the computer decides to give you that day has NO relevance to one's competence as a nurse. It just boggles the mind to think there are people who view themselves as somehow more qualified based on how many questions they answered and in what time on the NCLEX!
    Patti_RN likes this.
  9. 1
    Quote from mrr5745
    What happens when the home health pt codes and it's just you and your black bag? No code team, No doctors, No experienced nurses around to help. Sure, you could call 911, but while waiting for the ambulance you'd better be performing CPR...
    Or, do you have the assessment skills to distinguish between the patient's baseline and an impending code, and intervene appropriately and thus prevent said code? Some people look bad at baseline, and it's not appropriate to call 911. However, subtle changes from baseline could indicate a decline. Having the skill to tell the difference is typically something that comes with experience.
    mrr5745 likes this.
  10. 1
    But, you see most of these pop up home health companies (more open daily) really aren't legit. They just want you to chart and leave for the next patient. Really, it's about submitting charting for reimbursement. Sure there are a few good ones, but many more scams than legit.

    These new nurses especially the ones who've never had another career - work for these places, learn nothing and think they are doing great guns! They do what they are told, but forget that it's all on them, not their employer.
    mrr5745 likes this.


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