Sorry Nurse Recruiters/Nurse Managers! - page 15

by Isitpossible

32,960 Views | 170 Comments

As I receive rejection after rejection for nursing jobs, I feel the need to apologize to nurse recruiters/managers who overlook my BSN because I lack patient care tech experience. I am sorry I could not afford to take a job as... Read More


  1. 1
    I passed with 75 questions. Can't remember how long it took.It never once occurred to me to use that info on a resume.
    not.done.yet likes this.
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    Never give up. I have over 20 years experience. Considered too old. (I was 49). Finally was in right place at right time. This economy is hurting everyone. There is no real shortage yet either. Last year ANA had on their smartbrief site that 45% of graduated RNs could not find jobs within a year of graduating. So don't take it personal (I know its hard). Keep searching, keep trying. Continue learning. Good luck.
  3. 4
    @Zookeeper. I passed with 75 questions in about 45 minutes--maybe a bit less. My license has no such footnote on it. In fact, besides the name, my license is identical to the licenses of those who failed several times and finally passed with 200+ questions over a couple hours. I'm telling' ya... It doesn't matter!!!
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    Me three. The NCLEX is a very easy test - it's not really about nursing competency. It's about how well you can play the game. But using that as a measure, if you can't seem to realize that its just a game by the 5th attempt, well... then... give me your wallet.
    TiddlDwink likes this.
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    Quote from Patti_RN
    @Zookeeper. I passed with 75 questions in about 45 minutes--maybe a bit less. My license has no such footnote on it. In fact, besides the name, my license is identical to the licenses of those who failed several times and finally passed with 200+ questions over a couple hours. I'm telling' ya... It doesn't matter!!!
    *** Well said. Your right, it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter cause the NCLEX has very little to do with nursing.
  6. 5
    Quote from Zookeeper44
    Because if you understand how the NCLEX works, people who pass in 75 questions have a higher level of understanding of the content than those who required more questions. It's just one more measure of your level of understanding of at least the nursing theory. It's funny but I have not once heard anyone who passed in 75 say that it didn't mean anything.
    First, I think it's reasonable to assume that those who are in a position to hire new grads do understand how the NCLEX works. It's a bit insulting to suggest otherwise.

    And second, here's yet another person who can tell you that passing in 75 questions didn't mean anything. Nothing. Except, of course, bragging rights to the classmates who got stuck with alot more. Beyond that...zero.
    TiddlDwink, Altra, OnlybyHisgraceRN, and 2 others like this.
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    Quote from Altra
    While I can fully appreciate that recent college grads have entered the job market at an extremely difficult time of recession (as have other college grads in fairly cyclical 20-year increments) I have to ask: is there this level of indignation among college grads who studied different fields? Are the sociology, history and English majors of the world placing blame for their lack of employment/underemployment on their school? Are marketing majors who are slinging coffee and scones at Starbucks theorizing that their current employment as baristas was all part of some evil master plan?
    Probably not, but here's why. When you get a nursing degree, what can you do? Nursing. That is it. No other job, unless you throw your entire degree away and do something else, which a lot have to do.

    With liberal arts and business majors, the types of jobs available to you are really only limited to the degree hiring managers in a wide variety of industries look for. I got a job in MARKETING with an English degree because the hiring manager wanted a creative type in the position. No kidding. He also hired communications and journalism majors. Some other hiring managers in the department wanted business degrees. So, you had a wide variety of degrees represented for what were essentially very similar positions.

    You just can't do that with nursing degrees, and I think that is where the frustration is. It becomes a useless degree if you can't get a job in NURSING.
  8. 0
    Quote from netglow
    Me three. The NCLEX is a very easy test - it's not really about nursing competency. It's about how well you can play the game. But using that as a measure, if you can't seem to realize that its just a game by the 5th attempt, well... then... give me your wallet.
    Just out of curiosity -- so does your opinion on the NCLEX make the proverbial fifth-time tester someone who will always be a totally incompetent nurse or not? Or just someone who sucks at figuring things out? Just because my feelings on the NCLEX seem to match up to yours.

    I passed the NCLEX in 76 questions, took me twenty minutes, and I spent the weekend before the test studying questions off old books that I'd bought from a used bookstore. That makes me a great test taker, but I have no auspices about how good of a nurse I am.
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    Quote from Zookeeper44
    Because if you understand how the NCLEX works, people who pass in 75 questions have a higher level of understanding of the content than those who required more questions. It's just one more measure of your level of understanding of at least the nursing theory. It's funny but I have not once heard anyone who passed in 75 say that it didn't mean anything.
    Or it can mean that person has EXCELLENT test taking skills. Haha! Passing NCLEX with 75 questions in less than an hour doesn't impress me one single bit. Sorry....
    I passed nclex in 45 min, I never felt the need to mention it until now. I don't think I'm smarter than my RN friends that took 4-5 hours with 265 questions. We are BOTH RNs, who cares?
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    Sorry you are suffering such disappointment. How long have you been applying for jobs? I hear the average employment wait for new nurse is 9 months to 1.5 years. Ouch! I had a friend who was hired in 4 months, but she had a BSN, and the nursing school she attended was connected to the hospital that hired her, so I'm sure that helped. I'm a nursing student in my first year. I have applied to the only place around hiring nursing techs this summer and was told I will likely not be selected, whether I have the time or not. This is because the place that is hiring techs is connected to that same university, so they hire their own first and they had a huge number of applicants this year just for the tech jobs. So I don't know how new nurses are expected to get experience when we can't even get a nurse tech position. And another worry is that all these new nurses will continue to sit around while the economy continues to slump and when hiring finally begins again, they will want fresh new nurses, not old new nurses who have a rusty memory of their skills and knowledge. Hospitals, especially, are all about the dollar. They don't want to spend one extra second of time training a new nurse if they can help it. Anyway, I hope your luck changes soon. DP


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