serving alcohol to patients - page 5

I just started my first job as a nurse at a nursing home dementia unit. The other nurses who have oriented me to the unit give 3 shots of whiskey to a patient after dinner. He also gets HTN meds,... Read More

  1. Visit  Lynx25 profile page
    0
    We have "Happy Hour" every week on Friday with beer and wine, A refridgerator with Budweiser in it for a certain resident, and another is allowed two shots of Jack Daniels a day.

    I don't care if it's not medically needed... they want to drink, let them have a few glasses of wine.. let the family take them out for cocktails, have fun!


    As far as the med pass thing... If I work nights, I have 60 patients. Don't wanna hear the FIRST whimper about med pass times. Seriously.
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  3. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    1
    When I worked in assisted living, we had residents who had orders for booze. One had a scheduled drink and a PRN drink.
    xtxrn likes this.
  4. Visit  xtxrn profile page
    0
    One of the standard orders on admission to all LTCs I've worked in was the ok to have alcohol. The nursing home is their home. It's not prison, or some sort of punishment. These folks were drinking booze at home with their meds. To NOT give it could be a bigger risk, depending on how long the guy has been drinking. Granted 3 shots isn't much in terms of alcoholism- and the guy may not have an addiction; but physical tolerance is not the same thing. If you'd rather deal with the death of someone following seizures w/DTs- I guess that's up to you (along with withholding a MD order). It's booze- not cyanide.
  5. Visit  MomRN0913 profile page
    1
    If the LTC is their home, they are entitled ot it, and a Dr's order needs to be in place.

    As far as the meds go, think about it. How many people who live at home take their meds at 6pm, then 8pm, then 10pm?

    A patient being managed at home usually has morning meds and night meds. That's it. And usually when it is convenient for them. It's different in an acute care setting, if there is scheduled abx, or you are strictly trying to control a BP.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.


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