New nurse still on orientation and first med error? - page 5

Let me just start off by saying im extremely cautious about giving meds and checking and double checking them because I dont want to make a med error but on my last shift a patient got up and... Read More

  1. Visit  Susie2310 profile page
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    Quote from dudette10
    At the risk of sounding clueless, I have to ask why renal failure and sepsis would be a contraindication to Tylenol. I've been googling, and there are plenty of links to acute hepatic failure, but not acute renal failure. (There are some links suggesting--not proving--that long-term Tylenol use can be a contributing factor in chronic renal failure.) In addition, there are order sets for sepsis that include Tylenol as an analgesic choice.
    In my husband's case, sepsis led to acute renal failure. Acute renal failure means there is an abrupt decrease in blood flow to the kidneys. NSAIDS can slow blood flow to the kidneys (Mayo Clinic: Acute kidney failure). Another reference (Mackenzie Walser MD in his book Coping with Kidney Disease, mentions that NSAIDS including Tylenol have the potential to cause kidney failure). These are the main reasons I am glad my husband was not given Tylenol when he had sepsis and acute renal failure - his kidneys were failing; he didn't need a medication that could further compromise their function when they were already severely compromised. Since being discharged, his nephrologist has also told him to avoid Tylenol. These are my thoughts about my husband's illness. I cannot speak to there being order sets for sepsis that include Tylenol as an analgesic choice. I am just glad that for the reasons I gave above, that my husband was not given it, or any other NSAID. He needed antibiotics, and he needed fluid boluses, which he got.
  2. Visit  wooh profile page
    1
    Quote from dudette10
    At the risk of sounding clueless, I have to ask why renal failure and sepsis would be a contraindication to Tylenol. I've been googling, and there are plenty of links to acute hepatic failure, but not acute renal failure. (There are some links suggesting--not proving--that long-term Tylenol use can be a contributing factor in chronic renal failure.) In addition, there are order sets for sepsis that include Tylenol as an analgesic choice.
    Long term acetaminophen use is possibly contraindicated for renal patients, but from what I've seen, short term use doesn't seem to be an issue. (Of note, tylenol isn't an NSAID.)
    dudette10 likes this.
  3. Visit  Susie2310 profile page
    0
    Quote from wooh
    Long term acetaminophen use is possibly contraindicated for renal patients, but from what I've seen, short term use doesn't seem to be an issue. (Of note, tylenol isn't an NSAID.)
    You are correct, tylenol is not classed as an NSAID.

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