Become a nurse in just 12 months!!! - page 3

How do you feel about the nursing shortage being relieved by "fast track" nursing programs? A program that only takes 12 months. Read this article: ---------------------- College grads... Read More

  1. by   Gennaver
    Quote from bonemarrowrn
    . I didn't say a few college credits. Some probably have 'some college'. In my clincial groups (total of 18 students) there are at least 5 that I know of, off the top of my head, that have Bachelor's degrees in another field...
    Hi,

    Those are five slots that belong to non-degreed students who have no other option to earn their nursing degree other than the ADN.

    Why not create more schools for students with current BA's or BS's or Masters and open up those Associate schools to students who cannot go any other route?

    Personally I was very, very happy to relinquesh my seat at a local junior college's Associate Nursign program, once I got accepted into my master's entry program. I remember the feeling when I applied for an associate program in the past and missed the deadline. I went another route through sheer luck and hard work.

    I was sincerely thrilled to get into my program and opening up my associate slot to a waitlister was just a wonderful side benefit! I did that about 8 weeks or so before the both programs started.

    Gen
  2. by   MiaNJ
    I know there are variations in programs, but I think for the most part, the actual # of hours of clinical time is about the same for all programs. It's just that with an Accelerated program, they are more 'condensed'...so there are no summer breaks..and maybe more clinical hours during the week...whereas in a program where there are 2 yrs of clinicals..they may be spread out more..but in the end both programs can have the same # of clinical hours...and we all have to take the same test for the Rn license.

    I do think the Accelerated program is more stressful though since there is more workload of courses/clinicals in shorter time frame.
    But I want to get it over with quick..since I'm over 30 now and don't want to spend another 2-3 yrs in school.




    Quote from Future_RN_Jess
    True for some programs. Mine is 1yr. pre-reqs and 2 clinicals. I agree with you as it being the same thing if you really think about it.
  3. by   youknowho
    Another fast tracker here...I am finishing up my 6th month of an 18 month BSN program. I LOVE IT. I couldn't imagine it any other way. We take all the same classes but with no break (well we do get Christmas off). It really is not for everyone but for people who love a little pressure, its great.
  4. by   felixfelix
    I was tempted...but with the pre-req's and such, I decided it would be the same amount of time as an ADN program, and here's the clincher...ADN program, maybe $3K. Accel program, $40k...(your mileage may vary).
    I could see how this would be perfect for some, though, and I'm glad they exist. If you've got the hormones for this program, go for it.
  5. by   rstewart
    Many years ago I was completing a degree in Music when I realized that I had enough Psychology hours for a double major. The problem was that the psychology degree would come from the College of Arts and Sciences and unlike the School of Music, there was a foreign language requirement, four semesters worth, in fact.

    Ahhhhhh but I was "fortunate". There was an experimental accelerated foreign language class (German) being offered. The class was 14 semester hours and it was strongly recommended that you enrolled for only that class.

    The hours of instruction were identical in number to those who took the classes in 4 consecutive semesters. But we had to memorize a week's worth of grammar and vocabulary about every day or two. Time outside of class was spent in the language lab or in nightly "cram" sessions/study groups.

    The tests and other requirements were identical to the traditional classes. But our students dropped like flies-----from 25-30 down to 5 of us at the end. And although I received an A and could read German fairly well, in less than one year I could barely remember anything but a blur.

    In no way is one year sufficient time to become a nurse---- BSN or otherwise. And please don't tell me that the joke nursing boards have become will provide a safety net for the public. Show me another profession where answering most of 75 questions correctly can qualify for a license and I will promise to be more receptive to that argument.

    These non-traditional programs are ridiculous; ever notice that no matter how they are condensed in time they always cost a small fortune? Now just why do you think that is?
  6. by   Gennaver
    Quote from MiaNJ
    I know there are variations in programs, but I think for the most part, the actual # of hours of clinical time is about the same for all programs.
    ....
    Hello MiaNJ,

    This is the assumption I used to have too but, I am finding out that the program that gets the most clinical hours are the Associate Degree Nursing programs.

    Please do not take my word on it, I do not know for certain.

    Gen
  7. by   Sheri257
    Just my personal opinion but, I'm in a traditional ADN program, and I still don't think even that is enough. There's too much to learn in nursing with too little time. And, even though ADN's supposedly have more clinical hours, I feel we need even more. Everything is too rushed and I don't feel I'm getting the time to learn things as thoroughly as I would like.

    The school does the best that it can within the time constraints but, there's never enough time. I notice that people make comments like, you'll learn more on the job. But I would prefer to be better trained before I have patients lives in my hands.

    Sure ... everybody would like to be done with school sooner so they can start making money. But I don't think that's necessarily a good thing for the patients.

  8. by   rstewart
    Ok, now I know there are strong feelings on all sides of the entry to practice issue ----but that said may I ask:

    Does anyone honestly believe that a nurse receiving a BSN after one year in nursing school (irrespective of previous educational preparation) will develop superior critical thinking skills, will experience increased respect from administration/physicians/general public, will be more likely to have the tools to better "rescue" patients resulting in improved complication and mortality outcomes, will be better prepared for being a charge nurse, will have equal or better psychomotor skills/knowledge of equipment use....than a diploma prepared nurse who spent 3 years on the floor?

    Or why is 2 years of intense training as a nurse (ie associate degree preparation) inadequate for the complex patients, technological advances blah blah blah of today, yet one year of intense nursing education is apparently sufficient if it results in a BSN?
  9. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from MiaNJ
    But most of the entire 1st year of a 'traditional' ADN program consists of general Ed courses such as Math, English, History, Social Science, etc. etc...then the Science prereqs such as A&P I & II, Chem, etc.

    So in reality...the Actual 'nursing courses' and clinicals in a traditonal ADN program is approx. 1 year also...Just like in the Accel. program we will be doing just nursing courses and alot of clinicals right from the start.
    I beg to differ. The program I teach in is 2 full years of nursing, with the pre and co-reqs thrown in. Those who have the pre-reqs already are only taking nursing (about 10 credits). those who are doing it the 'traditional' way are taking A&P 1, psych, and the nursing classes (which includes clinical). Then next sem. they will take A&P 2, another liberal arts class, and the nursing classes.

    So the Accel. 'Fast Track' program is not really all that 'fast' ...in the sense that traditional 2 yr. nursing programs also do most of their clinicals in the last year also.
    It's 'Fast Track' since most of the applicants..ALREADY took most of the prereqs.
    So have a number of my students. But they still need to complete 4 semesters of nursing. The clinicals need to follow a sequence, you can't take NU 101 at the same time as NU 102 (obviously). But I guess in an accel. program they all mesh together.

    But in traditional BSN programs...they don't do any longer clinical time than the Accel. or ADN program.
    They may or may not. Every program/school is different. There are no required amount of clinical hours for a nursing program. it is at the discretion of the school. if you feel 50 clinical hours are enough for your students, then that's all you need to require. Also, in the BSN program, you are more prepared to go into the field. You've done all your pre-reqs (while some of my students are doing them at the same time). They have had nursing theory already, they know medical terminology, disease process and management (in theory). Some of my students did not have a clue...and I don't mean this as an insult, they have not been taught the content yet
  10. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from rstewart
    ok, now i know there are strong feelings on all sides of the entry to practice issue ----but that said may i ask:

    does anyone honestly believe that a nurse receiving a bsn after one year in nursing school (irrespective of previous educational preparation) will develop superior critical thinking skills, will experience increased respect from administration/physicians/general public, will be more likely to have the tools to better "rescue" patients resulting in improved complication and mortality outcomes, will be better prepared for being a charge nurse, will have equal or better psychomotor skills/knowledge of equipment use....than a diploma prepared nurse who spent 3 years on the floor?

    or why is 2 years of intense training as a nurse (ie associate degree preparation) inadequate for the complex patients, technological advances blah blah blah of today, yet one year of intense nursing education is apparently sufficient if it results in a bsn?
    [font="comic sans ms"]you bring up an interesting point. i never though of that. everyone bashes the adn program. that would be a real interesting research study
  11. by   shodobe
    Don't like it, never will. Who cares if you have a BS in something else. Yeah, I want someone with a BS in philosophy or a structural engineer taking care of me with a quickee nursing degree. Some people do well with exams and probably would do well with the NECLEX but stand out as nurses who don't know their basic stuff. Some BS degrees would be exceptable because they deal with people in general, others do not. I just can't understand why people can't go through traditional programs, 2 or 4 years. This type of "quick fix" just doesn't cut it in my book. Eventually this will come back to haunt us when were old and need "good" nursing care. The only ones who I accept in a "bridge" program are those who have been LVNs, all others should stay the road and do it the old fashioned way. Sorry, just my opinion.
  12. by   suzanne4
    I personally do not like the accelerated programs, there is just too much information to learn in a very short time. The biggest issue is when they graduate, how much time that it will take for them to really feel comfortable with everything.

    Other countires are still not receptive to the idea either. They don't accept the accelerated programs in the US for licensure, either.

    If the old-fashioned exam were still available and they were able to make it thru that, then it would be a different story, but NCLEX is not a good predictor in my view.

    I am sure that there are others that do not agree with me, but as Mike stated above, both of us have been in this field too long not to see the differences.
  13. by   ICRN2008
    I am just finishing the first semester of an accelerated, 16-month BSN program. The only difference between the Accelerated and Traditional programs at my school is the time frame. We go straight through the summer, while the traditional students have time off or can elect take one of their spring or fall classes to lighten the load. We take the exact same classes, and we were required to complete the same prerequisites.

    Nowhere on my transcript will it state that I went through an accelerated nursing program. My nursing degree will be just as valid as that of my classmates who went the traditional route and took the summer off. The only difference is that I will be able to start working 5 months sooner than they will.

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