Which PDA?

  1. I've been offered a beta test of medical reference for PDAs by a major publisher. I'd love to work with them on it, but I need to aquire an actual PDA first. Which unit do people prefer? I know the Palm units have the major market share, but I read good things about the Handera units. Any advice on brand, megs, memory, speed, price, etc. from actual working nurses using these things would be appreciated.

    v-
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  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   rninformatics
    Originally posted by V SPN
    I've been offered a beta test of medical reference for PDAs by a major publisher. I'd love to work with them on it, but I need to aquire an actual PDA first. Which unit do people prefer? I know the Palm units have the major market share, but I read good things about the Handera units. Any advice on brand, megs, memory, speed, price, etc. from actual working nurses using these things would be appreciated.

    v-
    I will admit to being in love with my PalmIIIc but my next device will have a WindowsCE operting sysem just because IMHO the operating system and applications it supports are more robust and universal. I'm looking at the iPAQ or one of the Casio devices.

    Figure out which software applications you would be most interested in using, investigate which apps run on which devices (many commercially sold apps are now available for both operting systems) how much processing power and or expansion capabilities you will need, etc.
    Another functionality I am looking at is the combination PDA/cellphone device, such as the Kyocera.
    Check out the sites and associated listserves below and pose your question also.
    Good Luck and happy hunting !

    Nursing Pocket PC
    http://communities.msn.com/nursingpo.../homepage.msnw

    and

    Handheld Med

    http://www.handheldmed.com/

    and

    PDACortex formerly RNPalm

    http://www.rnpalm.com/
  4. by   3651bht
    Love it.. Got it for $299 Palm OS. Visor.com lots of free software..And sign up for ebates.com and get 5% back.. Passworded and has confidentiality set up.. Check it out...16MG
  5. by   RNpalm
    Choosing the right gadget is not easy. Most healthcare professionals ( some say as much as 80%) use a device powered by the Palm OS. This means if you choose to go with a Palm OS device you'll have a lot of colleagues who are already familiar with the system and you'll have access to more software.

    There is still much more healthcare software available for the Palm OS than the Pocket PC, but this is changing, and more Pocket PC stuff is becoming available.

    The best advice is: Check with the people you work with to see which OS has the dominate position in your in your group (there are places that favor the Microsoft OS) and go with that.

    The debate between Palm Vs Microsoft is "on going" and there is no end in sight. So the best answer still is: Get the one that you like and works best in your group.

    If this answer seems inadequate, all you need do is have a look at the forums on our site PDA cortex to see that the jury is still out and the debate lives on ;-)

    Regards
    Ken

    PDA cortex
    "first hand intelligence"

    http://www.PDAcortex.com
  6. by   PC Nurse
    I have started to distribute the iPAQ (PocketPC) to some of the key management, nursing and ancillary health users. They find it to be an invaluable tool and use it to dictate and write notes which are then transferred to the CPR. It also serves as a reference tool utilizing different publications. I have found physicians reluctant to move to the iPAQ from the Palm OS as they are comfortable with them and most purchased the unit themselves.
    The main drawbacks I have found are battery life (I get 2.5 hours of constant use), difficulty interfacing with Lotus notes - we are using Cadenza from common time and find that to be a very good product, and that epocrates (a popular PalmOS software)is not available for this platform. .
    Having 32MB ram (we use the 3650) with a 200mhz processor are big selling points. They are more powerful then most of the desktop units we have.

    Most common uses by our staff:
    [list=1][*]spreadsheets - stats[*]task list[*]notes[*]short dictation[*]email and scheduling[*]reference materials[*]contact files and information[/list=1]

    Another section of the hospital uses the wireless card attachment to access their CPR and transmit real-time data. We are planning to use this in the future.
  7. by   rninformatics
    Originally posted by PC Nurse
    I have started to distribute the iPAQ (PocketPC) to some of the key management, nursing and ancillary health users. They find it to be an invaluable tool and use it to dictate and write notes which are then transferred to the CPR. It also serves as a reference tool utilizing different publications. I have found physicians reluctant to move to the iPAQ from the Palm OS as they are comfortable with them and most purchased the unit themselves.
    The main drawbacks I have found are battery life (I get 2.5 hours of constant use), difficulty interfacing with Lotus notes - we are using Cadenza from common time and find that to be a very good product, and that epocrates (a popular PalmOS software)is not available for this platform. .
    Having 32MB ram (we use the 3650) with a 200mhz processor are big selling points. They are more powerful then most of the desktop units we have.

    Most common uses by our staff:
    [list=1][*]spreadsheets - stats[*]task list[*]notes[*]short dictation[*]email and scheduling[*]reference materials[*]contact files and information[/list=1]

    Another section of the hospital uses the wireless card attachment to access their CPR and transmit real-time data. We are planning to use this in the future.
    How was funding and the initiative to supplement your stationary PCs with PDAs obtained?
    Which vendor software/CPR product is your organization utilizing?
    How are the management users "transfering" data from the PDA device to the CPR system? Wireless or Hotsyn?

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