work abroad w/out experience.. possible? - page 6

if possible... where? would that be advisable? tnx!:p... Read More

  1. Visit  adangerousbeauty profile page
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    Quote from pinoy_guy
    this was also the feedback I got from RN friends who are now working in the US.

    from what I know, agencies in the Philippines are the ones insisting on Philippine nursing experience.
    Yup, it's only the agency requiring these...to protect their names perhaps.
    From a personal experience during my interview w/ a U.S. employer...the chief nurse said that its ok for them to hire fresh grads even w/o hosp. experience because they themselves have lots of fresh grads who were fast-learners.
    Anyway, since there's a retrogression, it would be a better move to gain some hosp. experience for continued learning. And just because hosp. experience is not required in the U.S., doesnt mean you would altogether neglect your career growth when you're still in your home country. Dont work in a job that pays (e.g. call center)>> still opt for nursing-related though you get minimum wage...argh!.
  2. Visit  nrswnabee profile page
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    Quote from lawrence01
    That's how it is done here. That's the system. If it's correct or not is open for debate.

    However, once a nurse becomes a regular staff every routine procedure should be done 1st by the staff and they get only 1 try then suppose to pass the "buck" to the next in line w/c are the interns then in turn to the residents.
    -----

    both ways, none of that should be acceptable (i.e. the doctor relying on the nurse's assessment or the nurse depending on the clerk/intern). nursing and medicine are considered distinct professions answerable to different practice standards. nurses aren't doctors' handmaids hence it is only right that they assess their patients separately as well as make their own nursing diagnoses to carry out. doctors write medical diagnoses and whatever treatment/management they order will be collarborative with nursing or other professional interventions.
  3. Visit  lawrence01 profile page
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    Quote from nrswnabee
    -----

    both ways, none of that should be acceptable (i.e. the doctor relying on the nurse's assessment or the nurse depending on the clerk/intern). nursing and medicine are considered distinct professions answerable to different practice standards. nurses aren't doctors' handmaids hence it is only right that they assess their patients separately as well as make their own nursing diagnoses to carry out. doctors write medical diagnoses and whatever treatment/management they order will be collarborative with nursing or other professional interventions.
    Yes, you are correct. Unfortunately, that is how it is done in most hospitals here, esp. w/ those that have both medical clerks and interns.

    But just want to make some clarifications (to be fair) that consultant doctors never rely on the nurse's assessments but they rely on their residents and the residents sometimes rely on their interns and/or clerks.

    If you would notice.. the medical clerks and/or interns do the V/S, follow-up the labs, maintains the NGTs and other cathethers and tubes, does the daily wound-care, administers medications (except for the routine ones), etc..

    I'm sure you observed these here.
  4. Visit  nrswnabee profile page
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    Quote from lawrence01
    Yes, you are correct. Unfortunately, that is how it is done in most hospitals here, esp. w/ those that have both medical clerks and interns.

    But just want to make some clarifications (to be fair) that consultant doctors never rely on the nurse's assessments but they rely on their residents and the residents sometimes rely on their interns and/or clerks.

    If you would notice.. the medical clerks and/or interns do the V/S, follow-up the labs, maintains the NGTs and other cathethers and tubes, does the daily wound-care, administers medications (except for the routine ones), etc..

    I'm sure you observed these here.
    -----

    first, i miss the doggie avatar, hehe.

    yeah, i'm simply saying how things should be (as we've been taught it should be). i never really had the chance to see how it is home but from what i remember my sister tells me, way back when she was an md student, they would often ask the nurses about how-to's (foleys, IV, etc...) as they USUALLY know better hands-on than some doctors who must have stopped touching pts after medical school, hehe. (NO generalization here and no offense directed to anyone....)
  5. Visit  lawrence01 profile page
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    Quote from nrswnabee
    -----

    first, i miss the doggie avatar, hehe.

    yeah, i'm simply saying how things should be (as we've been taught it should be). i never really had the chance to see how it is home but from what i remember my sister tells me, way back when she was an md student, they would often ask the nurses about how-to's (foleys, IV, etc...) as they USUALLY know better hands-on than some doctors who must have stopped touching pts after medical school, hehe. (NO generalization here and no offense directed to anyone....)
    Yes, you are correct. Non-surgical consultant doctors pretty much stop doing procedures after their residency training.
  6. Visit  e_robot profile page
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    I think its best to get experience first. people just see nursing in the philippines as a means to go to the US and make money (i know im making a sterotype but for those who arent like that im sorry) now dont get me wrong im in support of that i just dont think being in a rush to get money should interfer with gaining a little experience
  7. Visit  adangerousbeauty profile page
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    philippine nsg experience is not credited in the u.s....and so ar the over-priced trainings/seminars like acls blah blah>> these are all money-making crap!

    an aunt of mine whos been working as a nurse in the us for god-knows-how-long told me so. before immigrating to the us, she has worked in the philippines, as well as libya(middle east) at the height of the bloody war! >> and that suicide work wasnt counted in the us either! what more if the work was from a corrupt country like the philippines. no wonder japan is thinking of dumping all their garbage in the trash can a.k.a. philippines.

    as for experience, if i dont have any other choice, why volunteer? apply as staff nurse instead, she said. after all, we are professionals now (or maybe professional slaves?) where can you ever find a professional who has to volunteer and "that even doesnt give an assurance that you will be hired". all you get is some certificate! arent ojt's, like in some professions, have decent starting pays? so why not in nursing? what difference do we have with other professionals? and think about having to volunteer at a govt hospital at no fixed duration before being absorbed. i know someone who volunteered for nine months before being absorbed. raaatssss...we are not slaves for crissake...like beggars who beg for hospitals(who take advantage of our ignorance) to hire us:angryfire
  8. Visit  lawrence01 profile page
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    Quote from reeyah
    philippine nsg experience is not credited in the u.s....and so ar the over-priced trainings/seminars like acls blah blah>> these are all money-making crap!

    an aunt of mine whos been working as a nurse in the us for god-knows-how-long told me so. before immigrating to the us, she has worked in the philippines, as well as libya(middle east) at the height of the bloody war! >> and that suicide work wasnt counted in the us either! what more if the work was from a corrupt country like the philippines. no wonder japan is thinking of dumping all their garbage in the trash can a.k.a. philippines.

    as for experience, if i dont have any other choice, why volunteer? apply as staff nurse instead, she said. after all, we are professionals now (or maybe professional slaves?) where can you ever find a professional who has to volunteer and "that even doesnt give an assurance that you will be hired". all you get is some certificate! arent ojt's, like in some professions, have decent starting pays? so why not in nursing? what difference do we have with other professionals? and think about having to volunteer at a govt hospital at no fixed duration before being absorbed. i know someone who volunteered for nine months before being absorbed. raaatssss...we are not slaves for crissake...like beggars who beg for hospitals(who take advantage of our ignorance) to hire us:angryfire
    sad to say but what you posted re: hospitals here are all true. they take advantage of nurses and other healthcare-related personnel, including medical clerks, interns and residents.

    do you know for a fact that resident doctors generally has a lower pay than a staff nurse? staff nurses' monthly pay can go up to 10-14,000+++ a month (private hospital) because of ots while those residents only get 7-8,000+++ a month (fixed) and they go on duty almost every other day. they are lucky if they get a duty, post, pre-duty schedule. nowadays, it's just duty and post-duty and those two sometimes do not have distinctions anymore.

    ever seen a resident or intern falling asleep or snoozing during an or or seeing them w/ the same clothes the next day (heavily perfumed or cologned). i know you did.
  9. Visit  chick_pea profile page
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    Quote from asianrn
    hey caloy...your orientation depends on what unit/deparment you are going. My experiences are only with ED and ICU. I guess for the most part is basically read your nursing books, know your systems, pharmacology, basic knowledge of assessment, your 5 route--there's meds that are IVP, POs, supp, IVPB--or slow IVP, to fast IVP to boluses...don't worry you'll know these stuff eventually..

    IV therapy class? is this the IV insertion class? if it is, you don't need it unless you plan to go to ED. Most hospitals have certified IV therapy team nurses to do the IV insertion for you, from your basic IV lines to PICC lines. Anyway, even if you did go to ED eventually, you'll learn the skills-IV insertion in the unit. Don't worry there will be alot of 'em to practice on, by day 3 you will be good at it. Just save your money if it is expensive..try not take certifications e.g BLS if you have to pay for it. Most hospitals offer this for free, even if you have to pay for the BLS, your hospital will reimburse you for the expenses once you are employed with them. So take it easy...you will have all the learning tools handed to you by your hospital from print outs of policies, procedures, systems review all in one binder!..

    Thank you so much!!!My exact problem.I wasn't able to take IV therapy back in the phils. I'll be on my orientation next week. Fresh grad fr PI, I've never given IVP, IV injections etc. as this was not allowed by our school.thnks a lot!
  10. Visit  nxt777 profile page
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    Quote from dindog
    I heard that some US hospitals prefer fresh grads (provided they passed all the required exams) who came from foreign countries because the training, system, ethics and equipment they use in the US are very much different compared here in the Philippines.
    i agree with you. although, i heard it from a hearsay. US setting is very much different from the Philippines. though, i also appreciate having hospital experience here in the Philippines to gain confidence if not with handling state-of-the-art medical equipments but atleast with dealing with different types of patients.
  11. Visit  belot97 profile page
    0
    First............................................. .................................................. ...........It's always a good thing to carry with you that confidence at work.
    Although it's possible to work abroad with out experience,I think
    it wouldnt be too bad serving your fellowmen at home first even just for a while ....in that way,you won't find yourself asking how does it feel nursing in Philippines once you get your retirement...
    Why hurry?
  12. Visit  Rep profile page
    0
    Quote from belot97
    First............................................. .................................................. ...........It's always a good thing to carry with you that confidence at work.
    Although it's possible to work abroad with out experience,I think
    it wouldnt be too bad serving your fellowmen at home first even just for a while ....in that way,you won't find yourself asking how does it feel nursing in Philippines once you get your retirement...
    Why hurry?
    I volunteered for more than a year and though I did not regret it I find it that hospital, a private one, took advantage of us, volunteer nurses. They knew we wanted to have experience and they took us so they can fully staff their floors. Some of the private floors were run by volunteer nurses, they could just have paid us or give us allowance. But they did not because nurses are a dime a dozen. Just to volunteeer we had to pass a nursing exam given by them and the waiting list to get into a volunteer position was long.

    I would not advice somebody here to volunteer. If one wants to work abroad, alot of positions do not require experience. Check the ads in the Manila Bulletin.
    Last edit by Rep on Dec 1, '06
  13. Visit  RNHawaii34 profile page
    0
    Quote from belot97
    first............................................. .................................................. ...........it's always a good thing to carry with you that confidence at work.
    although it's possible to work abroad with out experience,i think
    it wouldnt be too bad serving your fellowmen at home first even just for a while ....in that way,you won't find yourself asking how does it feel nursing in philippines once you get your retirement...
    why hurry?
    yes, i totally agree with you. the only regret i had is that i didn't have the chance to be a nurse in the philippines..i remember during our clinical rotation in the community health center is that, the patients, men, women and children really have a high respect for nurses, i felt really good about it, not like when you work straight from graduation, and work abroad without experience and foreign patients are very different. they are more demanding, and won't hesitate to say what's on their mind, and there are a lot of unhappy patients who wants to make you feel miserable....if that happens to me, i just think back about my experiences as a student nurse in the philippines..to me, if you really want to work abroad? it is wise to at least have a year or two experience in nursing in the philippines. then, you will really appreciate this profession if you are working abroad.yes, in america, nursing setting is way different from the philippines, but you have to remember, we filipinos are very flexible, we can adjust to anything because we are so used to hardships back home, right? goodluck to you all!!! :icon_redface: :holly3: :holly2: :icon_razz:

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