Training on Dialysis - page 14

I want to attend a training program on dialysis treatments. Where can I train? Which one offers the best training? How much is the program fee? How long is the training? I've been looking on... Read More

  1. Visit  JLLandero profile page
    0
    kmpnrn, how can I inquire about NKTI's dialysis training??
  2. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    I have to ask, does the Phillipines have such a high rate of kidney failure that dialysis nurses are in such demand?
  3. Visit  i am shane profile page
    0
    @JLLandero

    thank you again. just one more question, when is the start of the training, the requirements and the mode of payment? thanks!
  4. Visit  rogue_maverick profile page
    1
    Quote from Fiona59
    I have to ask, does the Phillipines have such a high rate of kidney failure that dialysis nurses are in such demand?
    Sad to say, but yes. Just look at how many free-standing dialysis unit have opened up in the last 2 years in Metro Manila alone.

    There's actually an interplay between supply and demand not only concerning the increasing number of patients, but also the massively huge amount of entry level nurses seeking employment. Hospitals are so saturated now with a lot of applications, so nurses turn to other health care facilities, like dialysis centers, for clinical training and employment.

    Renal facilities take advantage of the oversupply of nurses by providing dialysis nursing training, which at the same time is a big help in their staffing needs. Not that all trainees are being hired immediately after the program, but to have several trainees per shift is such an ease in the daily working efficiency of the renal unit.

    Just imagine if you have a 16-bed dialysis center, with a ratio of 1 nurse to 4 patients. That will require 4 full time staff nurses per patient shift. But with trainees, lets say 4 per shift, these 4 extra manpower are actually a big help in patient transition, especially if these are already "senior" trainees whom you can allow to work without much supervision.

    So it's just like that, business people see opportunity and offer a win-win deal. Novice nurses learn dialysis nursing, and renal centers earn from them, with the added benefit of having enough nurses on their units.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  5. Visit  JLLandero profile page
    1
    @i am shane

    The training will start on June 25.

    Requirements: You have to attend the orientation, submit a resume and must have a latest BLS and IVT card plus your PRC ID for the training, and ACLS (preferred but not required). I forgot to add, you must also have a Hepa-B screening and ^^

    [For the RENAP ID however, you must complete the 6 months training, and aside from your BLS, IVT and PRC, you must be a current member of PNA and you must have at least 6 months working experience. Volunteer experience is accepted. You must also undergo an exam and interview to have the RENAP license.]

    Mode of payment: Cash basis you'll get a discount of 5%. You can pay in installment basis though per module.

    Module 1 = P7,500 = 3 installments
    Module 2 = P7,500 = 3 installments
    Module 3 = P10,000 = 4 installments
    Module 4 = P5,000 = 2 installments
    Last edit by JLLandero on Jun 10, '12
    rogue_maverick likes this.
  6. Visit  JLLandero profile page
    0
    I am really mulling it over since I have to shell out a 45kphp amount if I am to undergo the said training of NephroGroup for 6 months. I am also thinking since the training would mostly include HD. Theories will only be presented on PD, KT and so on but the main hands-on is HD.

    I've visited NKTI's website but there's not much infor regarding their dialysis training.
  7. Visit  i am shane profile page
    0
    Thank you. I called NKTI several weeks ago. As far as I remember, their HD training is good for 6mos for 36k. But one of the requirement is that you must have a 6mos experience in the field of dialysis. The training is fully book as of this year and will start again on 2013. I don't know if there's any changes regarding this info that they gave to me..
  8. Visit  JLLandero profile page
    0
    Thanks! But wait a minute... that's kinda confusing.... they require a 6 months experience in DIALYSIS for us to undergo the dialysis training?? I thought the training comes first before you can have the actual experience O_o.

    Oh well... I'm willing to undergo the training, it doesn't matter how long but the problem is money. I also have the hospital experience required

    I think the best bet would really be NephroGroup. There's a chance for employment also since they will be opening a lot of dialysis centers this year.
  9. Visit  rogue_maverick profile page
    0
    In my opinion, the NKTI and Fresenius Medical Care offers the best combination of theory-clinical practice in renal nursing.

    Why? Because they have a broader scope of training, which includes PD and KT.

    Prior to the establishment of nephro synergies (the training department of Nephro Group), the training was 90% skills and 10% theory, and there was no formal manner and venue for the theory part. It was mainly on the spot lecture on the principles of hemodialysis. (this was what I went through when I trained with nephro.)

    Now that nephro synergies is existing, what they did was actually very good since there is now formal educational structure for the training. The drawback though, is cost. What they are asking for now is way way higher than before. (I actually got my training for free.)

    As what JLlandero mentioned, there is a very good chance to get employed with nephrogroup after the training, since the company is currently in an aggressive state in opening a lot of branches nationwide. Just show your worth right from day one.

    (I started my career with the company, and like you guys, was a former trainee. i got hired by them even before my training ended due to a timely situation of being understaffed in one of their branches. Then when they opened a new branch, I was one of pioneer staff that started it from scratch. Also, I personally know the Training Director of Nephrogroup as she was my former superior where I last worked.)
  10. Visit  ceridwyn profile page
    1
    [QUOTE=rogue_maverick;6582914]Sad to say, but yes. Just look at how many free-standing dialysis unit have opened up in the last 2 years in Metro Manila alone.There's actually an interplay between supply and demand not only concerning the increasing number of patients, but also the massively huge amount of entry level nurses seeking employment. Hospitals are so saturated now with a lot of applications, so nurses turn to other health care facilities, like dialysis centers, for clinical training and employment. Renal facilities take advantage of the oversupply of nurses by providing dialysis nursing training, which at the same time is a big help in their staffing needs. Not that all trainees are being hired immediately after the program, but to have several trainees per shift is such an ease in the daily working efficiency of th renal unit.Just imagine if you have a 16-bed dialysis center, with a ratio of 1 nurse to 4 patients. That will require 4 full time staff nurses per patient shift. But with trainees, lets say 4 per shift, these 4 extra manpower are actually a big help in patient transition, especially if these are already "senior" trainees whom you can allow to work without much supervision.So it's just like that, business people see opportunity and offer a win-win deal. Novice nurses learn dialysis nursing, and renal centers earn from them, with the added benefit of having enough nurses on their units.[/QUOTE

    Do you ever see a time when nurses say "No More" offering free services?
    Last edit by ceridwyn on Jun 10, '12
    Fiona59 likes this.
  11. Visit  rogue_maverick profile page
    1
    @ ceridwyn

    Of course we do. But the situation nursing in the Philippines is different from that of first world countries.

    This is the sad reality that Philippine nurses have to go through right after earning the license to practice the profession. So much professional registered nurses, yet not enough healthcare facilities to accomodate them for employment and career growth.

    And to have a goal of being able to work in hospitals overseas for a better life, employers look at experience. They would definitely hire those with the appropriate clinical experience since they are confident that the professional they are hiring really knows how to get the job done.

    And how get that valuable experience? it all goes back on being able land a job and start one's career as soon as after nurse registration. If being permanently employed as a full time staff is not possible, then in the meantime (though it may not be ideal) it is a wise move to have those trainings, such as in dialysis, so as not to be idle and better yet gain clinical experience as time passes by. And those trainings in return are venues for possible employment as full time staff in the near future.
    JLLandero likes this.
  12. Visit  Rayden profile page
    0
    "Keep interested in your own career, however humble. It is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time." - Desiderata.


    Like medicine, nursing has a lot of specialties and fields of practice to choose from. It's a matter of choosing one and being an expert in it.

    Whether you got into dialysis nursing by chance or by choice, we will all one day look back on how we started and what we went through to be where we are now.

    I got into renal nursing by chance. It just so happened I got accepted in a hemodialysis training program since no hospital was calling me after submitting all those CV's. I eventually got hired by the same company and showed my dedication to my job because I wanted to make a career out of it. 2 years after, I got an opportunity to work overseas, of which my training and experience in the Philippines became very valuable.

    Looking back, every effort, time and money I spent for that dialysis training was all worth it.
  13. Visit  Rayden profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=ceridwyn;6583886]
    Quote from rogue_maverick
    Sad to say, but yes. Just look at how many free-standing dialysis unit have opened up in the last 2 years in Metro Manila alone.There's actually an interplay between supply and demand not only concerning the increasing number of patients, but also the massively huge amount of entry level nurses seeking employment. Hospitals are so saturated now with a lot of applications, so nurses turn to other health care facilities, like dialysis centers, for clinical training and employment. Renal facilities take advantage of the oversupply of nurses by providing dialysis nursing training, which at the same time is a big help in their staffing needs. Not that all trainees are being hired immediately after the program, but to have several trainees per shift is such an ease in the daily working efficiency of th renal unit.Just imagine if you have a 16-bed dialysis center, with a ratio of 1 nurse to 4 patients. That will require 4 full time staff nurses per patient shift. But with trainees, lets say 4 per shift, these 4 extra manpower are actually a big help in patient transition, especially if these are already "senior" trainees whom you can allow to work without much supervision.So it's just like that, business people see opportunity and offer a win-win deal. Novice nurses learn dialysis nursing, and renal centers earn from them, with the added benefit of having enough nurses on their units.[/QUOTE

    Do you ever see a time when nurses say "No More" offering free services?
    Well, I would love to see my countrymen to be in that situation, where free services only exist by the true definition of being a "volunteer."

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