Hey, Heather Smith and UNA - page 2

LPNs ARE skilled nurses. You really should rethink your words.... Read More

  1. 0
    To play devils advocate here she does represent RN's in Alberta not LPN's and RN's. Don't hate the player, hate the game.

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  2. 0
    Quote from petethecanuck
    To play devils advocate here she does represent RN's in Alberta not LPN's and RN's. Don't hate the player, hate the game.
    Pete, over the last decade UNA has a history of insuting LPNs and RPNs. Heather has been taken to task for her words in the press by AUPE, CRPNA, and CLPNA. UNA has paid for billboards stating that only RNs can provide safe, quality care. After that one HSAA got on her case.

    There are some deluded fools out there that think LPNs and RPNs should run and try and join UNA. I can just imagine how UNA would treat differently qualified nurses.

    I understand protecting your own. We all know that UNA is in contract talks. She isn't going to be able to get big bucks out of the government this time, so she's resorting to fear tactics.

    I can think of several units at my site who will have this happen to them, the reduction in the number of RNs on the floor. Think it through, over the years UNA has gotten the RNs some great pay increases but in doing so, she's almost priced RNs off the floor. I've worked acute surgical units where there has been two RNs on the floor and six LPNs. No patient died, no care was compromised, it works.

    Fearmongering is just plain nasty. I just expect better from a professional organization, there are times the tactics used reminds of the bullying that the Teamsters used to do.
  3. 1
    See, there's the problem right there. We're actually killing patients left and right...we're just not skilled enough to know when a patient is dead!
    weemsp likes this.
  4. 0
    I can't comment on what Healther Smith has said/done over the past decade so this is just coming from my point of view as a new'ish RN.

    I personally think the reduction of RN's in the hospital is a mistake. (Overall) RN's are more highly trained and educated, have better analytical and critical thinking skills and patient outcomes are better with higher numbers RN's to LPN's. I will concede there are many LPN's out there with years and years of experience who are more competent then many RN's but for newer nurses, RN's are more highly trained.

    I do agree that over the years, the UNA has focused too much on wage increases. As a paying member I would like to see my union advocate for higher RN ratios for better patient care. I'm sorry if that upsets some, but that is what I believe.

    As for a mix of 2:6. I can't think of a worse situation to be in as an RN. What if 4 or 5 patients require direct IV lasix, or TPN? Those skills are beyond an LPN's scope of practice thus adding to the workload of the RN (and could compromise care).

    I also agree that the fearmongering tactic is nasty and uncalled for. There are more constructive ways to advocate for RN's without trashing other members of the health care team.
  5. 2
    Ah, Pete you are young.

    LPNs have been priming and doing the checks on TPN for as long as I can remember. Currently, we are not allowed to access the lines on the units. But how do you account for the LPNs who do dialysis and access CVCs on a regular basis, the LPNs who do home care and do PICC dsgs? The patients who do home TPN? They don't have an RN come to the house and check the bags and hook them up. I've worked on units where there have been 19 out 28 patients on TPN and there were NO issues. It's a case of at 1930, the LPNs go out and hang the bags primed by day shift up on the patients. The RN follows and hooks up the patient. If for some reason bags need changing, who ever hears the pump beep double checks and hangs the lipids.

    Until recently there was no direct IV push meds on any of the floors in my hospital. The reason was if a direct push was needed the resident who ordered it could do it or they patient was too unstable to be on the floor. It's only in the last two years that RNs have been pushing on the floor. The unit I currently work on has never had an IV push med required. It may never be required. There has been one IV chemo med hung in the last four years. Blood? Never will happen because of our patient's needs. TPN? The patient was on the home programme and did it herself.

    By your argument, the RNs who were educated under the hospital training system aren't capable of doing the skills that the BScNs are. And this I have to disagree with. Some of the best RNs I've worked with graduated in the late 70s and 80s. They don't have degrees.

    Every nurse regardless of education thinks critically and analytically. It's a bit of an insult to say that because we don't have a nursing degree we can't critcally think.
    weemsp and joanna73 like this.
  6. 2
    When it comes to some of the younger, new grad LPNs, it might be true that some RNs have better critical thinking....but overall, that is not true. Sure, the schools enjoy citing this propaganda, but we all basically take the same program. I've been an RN for 3 years, and I work with LPNs who do the same job. In fact, their IV starts are much better than mine.

    There is really nothing that an RN can do that an LPN can't, at least theoretically speaking. Once the true nursing shortage hits, they will need to utilize both RNs and LPNs, but until then, you will see more RN jobs disappear.

    We need both RNs and LPNs. But, having come from another Province, I will say that AB RNs receive some of the best perks around. This year, we probably won't receive anything during contract negotiations because there is no money for nurses, doctors or teachers. So be it.
    weemsp and Fiona59 like this.
  7. 3
    Quote from joanna73
    When it comes to some of the younger, new grad LPNs, it might be true that some RNs have better critical thinking....but overall, that is not true. Sure, the schools enjoy citing this propaganda, but we all basically take the same program. I've been an RN for 3 years, and I work with LPNs who do the same job. In fact, their IV starts are much better than mine.

    There is really nothing that an RN can do that an LPN can't, at least theoretically speaking. Once the true nursing shortage hits, they will need to utilize both RNs and LPNs, but until then, you will see more RN jobs disappear.

    We need both RNs and LPNs. But, having come from another Province, I will say that AB RNs receive some of the best perks around. This year, we probably won't receive anything during contract negotiations because there is no money for nurses, doctors or teachers. So be it.
    Thanks Joanna

    So nice to see an RN standing up for LPNs for once and recognizing what we have to offer!
    weemsp, Fiona59, and joanna73 like this.
  8. 0
    You're welcome. But it's also true....and we are supposed to be working together, right?


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