What Is Your Most Gross, Yucky, Disgusting Nursing Horror Story? - page 92

:D Here is my most gross, yucky, disgusting nursing story! I was working a night shift on a tele floor as a new Nurse. We had this one poor old lady who was confused and was restrained as... Read More

  1. by   FranEMTnurse
    Quote from daywalker
    bah! i always tell my tales at the supper table....and now everyone has a very strong stomach!:innerconf
    yep, it's either sink or swim, hunh honey. :d
  2. by   FranEMTnurse
    I have no idea if it's the horrible environment I lived in when I was growing up, or if it was science fiction movies like The Night of the Living Dead, or other things I have seen on TV or read in books, but I was watching Prison Break last night, and one of the prisoners said he murdered his father with a knife, then removed his brain and took a bite out of it. That didn't fase me one little bit. It just took me back to the days of Hannibal Lechter. Personally, I feel that this type of thing is one of the reasons nurses love nursing. They can take most of it. I can't stand to bear the injury of a little one though, because they are helpless victims of their environment, :flmngmd:and that makes me want to get the proverbial shotgun out and take action.
  3. by   fey_lassRN
    Quote from Diahni
    I second that, mom4josh! I didn't know that nursing students/beginning nurses got to vote! I am very aware of the "you have to do a year of med-surg before you do anything else" philososphy - I suspect that this may change as the shortage worsens. As well, I have never heard of the rules being changed for the benefit of the nurse or student. Maybe I should put this in another thread, since it's only gross, yucky and disgusting if you don't want to do med-surg, but my impression of WHY this remains so is this: In med-surg, you see a variety of medical situtions to make you well-rounded." I was given this line from a psych unit, whose director told me they more or less require this from their employees. His rationale is that let's say you're assess a person in alcohol withdrawal - what symptom are the withdrawal, and which ones are additional physical/psych medical issues for the person? Makes sense to me up to a point. On the other hand, every specialty has a lot of info and skills specific to that specialty, so in this way the year of med/surg might be a waste of time.
    I'd like to know people's experience/opinions on this!
    Diahni
    Well, most of the L&Ds I've worked in will only hire those with some experience, and they count preceptorships and internships towards that. And nurses, even young nurses, should have a choice. I'm a great L&D nurse, but I'd make a horrible med-surg nurse (I'd probably spend most of the shift hiding in the linen closet sobbing). We do deal with medical issues in L&D, but they all center around the pregnancy. An extra semester in med surg, on top of the two I'd already had in school, would have driven me out of nursing. Instead I was allowed in my niche, and I've been fairly happy there.
  4. by   Daywalker
    Quote from franemtnurse
    yep, it's either sink or swim, hunh honey. :d
    you bet! :spin:
  5. by   xviii-xxv
    a loogie flying acroos the room just an inch away ur face... disgusting
  6. by   Jessiedog
    Quote from xviii-xxv
    a loogie flying acroos the room just an inch away ur face... disgusting
    This one reminds me of so many times I have ducked and dodged various wet substances that come flying towards me from my patients. Some of the best ones are:
    1. I now KNOW that when you suction a new tracheostomy, you do it from the side, even if your vision of the stoma is not as clear. When you get close up, squinting as you insert that Y-Suction catheter, you have much less reaction time to dodge that ''green projectile'' which the cough reflex launches!
    2. Helping a person with two broken arms to blow their nose is not as problem-free as it sounds! I got the gloves, got a HUGE bunch of tissues, and stood well to the side. (The above experience had taught me not to stand straight-on.) Pt takes a big breath in, and blows HARD into the tissues. He does very well, except one string of snot richochets off the tissue and strikes me fair on my glasses!! My self-command was admirable - apart from a flinch and a verbal exclamation of Ahhh!, I managed not to embarrass my patient. I was VERY thankful for the glasses, which recieved a thorough scrubbing. If we'd still had autoclaves on the ward, I would have considered that too!
  7. by   FranEMTnurse
    Quote from Jessiedog
    This one reminds me of so many times I have ducked and dodged various wet substances that come flying towards me from my patients. Some of the best ones are:
    1. I now KNOW that when you suction a new tracheostomy, you do it from the side, even if your vision of the stoma is not as clear. When you get close up, squinting as you insert that Y-Suction catheter, you have much less reaction time to dodge that ''green projectile'' which the cough reflex launches!
    2. Helping a person with two broken arms to blow their nose is not as problem-free as it sounds! I got the gloves, got a HUGE bunch of tissues, and stood well to the side. (The above experience had taught me not to stand straight-on.) Pt takes a big breath in, and blows HARD into the tissues. He does very well, except one string of snot richochets off the tissue and strikes me fair on my glasses!! My self-command was admirable - apart from a flinch and a verbal exclamation of Ahhh!, I managed not to embarrass my patient. I was VERY thankful for the glasses, which recieved a thorough scrubbing. If we'd still had autoclaves on the ward, I would have considered that too!
    :hehe::hehe::clphnds:
  8. by   RedWeasel
    i had a dr pick up a pts hand and try to get her to pick dried blood out of her own nose---he also asked her if she could powder her own gtube site (?) she had many fxs and was in dire pain-and they have more ed than us? ugh
  9. by   xviii-xxv
    yeah miss jessiedog...that was a pt c tracheostomy... and boy i was lucky to dodge that loogie...:dncg:good thing the bed on front of his is vacant *phew*
  10. by   Jessiedog
    Quote from xviii-xxv
    yeah miss jessiedog...that was a pt c tracheostomy... and boy i was lucky to dodge that loogie...:dncg:good thing the bed on front of his is vacant *phew*
    In the ward I worked in, we always nursed the recent tracheostomies in a single room for that reason. It was still nasty scrubbing all those ''crusties'' off the wall in front of the bed, tho.
  11. by   Diahni
    Quote from Jessiedog
    In the ward I worked in, we always nursed the recent tracheostomies in a single room for that reason. It was still nasty scrubbing all those ''crusties'' off the wall in front of the bed, tho.
    Gross!
  12. by   midazoalm1953
    This happened just last week. We had a very confused pt in ICU, who had transfer orders, but no beds available. She really did not require much care. She often called out or yelled at times. Mostly we just looked in as she was just lonely. When she was calling out for HELP for the 10th time I went in to see what she wanted....well on her pt table were several brown stacks...she asks me if I'd like a brownie....of course those little brown stacks were poop! I couldn't stop laughing the rest of the shift...you had to see it!
  13. by   RanieRN
    Until this week, I thought the grossest patient we have is the gentleman who was found eating his foot skin (his nurse initially thought it was a duoderm given the thickness). Then I was assigned to a 90 year old, mean tempered woman who decorated the wall next to her bed with a lovely pattern of green phlegm.Housekeeping had to scrub so hard in places that paint came off. And when I had her the next day, the patient had started to fill in the areas where the paint had come off!

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