Residencies: doctors have it figured out - page 8

by Amistad

After chatting with a fourth year med student today at clinical, it occurred to me how vastly different the physician career-path is from our own. Fourth year medical students are undergoing the process of being matched to a... Read More


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    Quote from joanna73
    Residencies might be a good idea, but if nurses are expected to complete a 2 year residency, then the pay needs to increase. Doctors make a lot more than 25 dollars an hour. Really, they would be wise to revamp the system within the BSN program and make that the mandatory entry point. Students would have 4 years of clinical time instead of 2 years, and a one year residency afterwards.
    I don't know any BSN programs that have 4 years of clinical...all the BSN programs around here have 2 years of pre reqs and 2 years of clinical... The ADN programs have 1 year of pre reqs and 2 years of clinical. If you wanted the BSN programs to have 4 years of clinicals it would take much longer than 4 years to fit in 4 years of clinical time AND pre reqs. Most BSN students here need to take classes in the summer as well just to finish in 4 years with the way it is now.
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    In my area, one university offers a co-op program where students are offered paid student nurse preceptor-ship, at least that's how a few of my co-workers described it...they are able have a full assignment of pts. They were able to have three semesters of focused pt care in between semesters that included clinicals as well. This is a five-year program; students with the four year program have one co-op experience. It ends up being 3-3.5 years of clinical experience.

    Depending on the coursework layout of some university programs, people do end up having 4 years of clinicals, including pre-requisites. When I first went for nursing school, for my ADN, I was doing prerequisites along with nursing courses. For me, that was disastrous. When I decided to return to school and went through the PN program, where you are in clinicals within the second week, I knew that I had to separate prereq's and then focus on nursing. The program I graduated from, you were in clinical within the next week. Clinicals rounded out to be about 3 years worth in 2.5 years. But that's how I tailored my education. It worked for me, and was able to find an organization that automatically has a nurse residency program.
    Last edit by LadyFree28 on Mar 20, '13
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    Your BSN programs are different in the US, but it is very possible to do four years of clinical. Canadian universities have clinical years 1 through 4. The prerequisities aren't included in that time. Prerequisities are completed prior to entry, making your schooling a total of 5 years.
  4. 0
    Quote from joanna73
    Your BSN programs are different in the US, but it is very possible to do four years of clinical. Canadian universities have clinical years 1 through 4. The prerequisities aren't included in that time. Prerequisities are completed prior to entry, making your schooling a total of 5 years.
    I'm Canadian and in a BScN program, and like you mentioned we have 4 years of clinical. But I will graduate after a total of 4 years, as there were no prerequisites we entered into the nursing program right from high school.
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    You've taken the prerequisite courses in high school. For people who do not go straight into nursing school after high school (such as myself) there is a year of prerequisites, if you do not have them.
  6. 0
    Quote from joanna73
    Your BSN programs are different in the US, but it is very possible to do four years of clinical. Canadian universities have clinical years 1 through 4. The prerequisities aren't included in that time. Prerequisities are completed prior to entry, making your schooling a total of 5 years.
    Yes, I did five years total including prerequisites and we had clinical during all four years.
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    Residents get paid about $10 an hour on average.
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    There are recent work restrictions on residencies. Interns work 80 hours per week, upper level residents can work many more hours than that. There is also talk that they will increase the work hour limit, as many believe that post-graduate training is not sufficient. I would also like to point out that before these work hour restrictions residency would easily mean >120 hours a week, for up to 8 years, not counting fellowship. Just something to think about when comparing older doctors to younger ones. What I'm really trying to say is, if you do decide, as a profession, to start residencies, it will rapidly become mandatory. And everybody will have to do it to get a job. Which will basically double the amount of time you are required to be trained.


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