? for instructors

  1. I was curious about how instructors from other schools would deal with the types of situations I am about to describe.

    Student A calls 15 minutes prior to clinical start time and states she is running late. The previous evening a storm knocked out her power and her alarm didn't go off (and there actually was a storm that caused a fair amount of power outages). Student A was able to arrive for clinical less than 10 minutes late. Student A has had several problems with exhibiting minorly inappropriate behavior in patient care settings (not wearing hose, figiting, drawing...sort of immature)
    Would you consider Student A to be exhibiting unprofessional behavior because she is late? Would it have been better for her to call in sick than to come in late?

    Student B is going to a different clinical experience (we have several clinical experiences that we go to outside of our regular groups, and they all have different paperwork/requirements). Student B doesn't go to the hospital the day prior to the experience to get the information about the patient because she didn't realize we needed to do that for this particular experience.
    Would this one goof-up be enough for you to clinically fail this student if she had been doing well up to this point? (what bugs me about this one is that it is so close to the end of the semester she has little time to redeem herself, but had this experience been earlier in the semester she would have had plenty of time to redeem herself, and this is a very bright and dedicated student).

    I know that as students we are constantly having to prove that we are responsible, but it also seems that there is little to no room for being a human. And no, these aren't about me, but they easily could be! There but for the grace of God...
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   altomga
    By what you have said, Student A may need a professional talking too about resonsibility. You say she scribbles, fidgets, doesn't dress according to uniform "rules". That doesn't say too much about what kind of nurse she may be.
    Student B on the other hand made a "goof up". Okay maybe review what she was supposed to do, but don't fail her for it.
    That would be "silly".
  4. by   renerian
    I would coach student A especially if she is immature and define the expectations for student B. Did student B get a written handout of the expectations for the rotation?

    renerian
  5. by   memphispanda
    Originally posted by renerian
    I would coach student A especially if she is immature and define the expectations for student B. Did student B get a written handout of the expectations for the rotation?

    renerian
    Student A has been coached by multiple teachers and just really seems to need to grow up a lot. I'm not sure what's going to actually happen with her.

    Student B--we talked about what to do for this particular rotation back in January, but since then it hasn't been brought up again. The part about going the day before wasn't in writing, but all the other information was--what to wear, where to go, who to talk to, etc. She has probably redeemed herself, but she sure had to go through a big ordeal because of her mistake.
  6. by   wishingmary
    Student A sounds like she may have ADHD. Although this can't be used as an excuse for not following a standard;, fidgeting, and drawing may actually help her think. She did call about being late and sometimes things happen; i.e. storm. Being late less than 10 minutes, don't you have pre-conference? I hope you cut her some slack. e

    Student B - Our nursing instructors have everything is writing. Believe me (I'm a student) with so much due NOW, I keep my syllabus, albeit BIBLE in a place I can refer before each clinical experience and before each lecture.

    Even though this isn't a place I frequent, I hope a student's perspective is still welcomed. I guess since I can't delete that what I want to say is forgive me for feeling the need to respond. to "
  7. by   mark_LD_RN
    student A needs a professional talking to I would reccomend it be done by the dean of the nursing program or advisor. and be instructed that this is her one and only chance to straighten up.

    student B needs to recieve a failing grade for that clinical day. and instructed on what is required. it being mentioned months ago is not an excuse, it is the students responsiblity to know what is expected and be properly prepared for clinical. and in the future I reccomend that you have the requirements in writing in the syllabus.
  8. by   memphispanda
    Oh--I guess I could update this with the outcomes for these students.

    Student A passed the lecture portion of the class but failed clinical portion. She appealed on the basis of having a new psychological diagnosis and won. She will have to repeat the class, but she isn't out of the program.

    Student B failed that clinical day, made it up another time, and had no further problems.

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