Portfolio for an Interview? - pg.3 | allnurses

Portfolio for an Interview? - page 4

Hi, I'm looking for some interview advice. Recently I secured an interview in a large healthcare organization for a Childbirth Education Supervisor. Though the title is "supervisor" the job... Read More

  1. Visit  llg profile page
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    I'm sorry to read that you didn't get the job, Susy. Keep your eyes and ears open. There's bound to be another possibility with your name on it sometime.

    Take care,
    llg
  2. Visit  humiliated profile page
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    Definitely bring your portfolio because that is what is going to make you shine and after all you did accomplish everything so this is the appropriate time to brag. I just graduated from a BSN program in May and have been keeping a portfolio at the request of my school for two years now and appreciate the opportunity to show it because it lets them know more about where my passion lies. Also I know that the nurses at the hospital my school is located at is now requiring their nurses to keep a portfolio of accomplishments. If you need ideas on how to organize one, let me know I can help.
  3. Visit  hoolahan profile page
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    Quote from Susy K
    Didn't get the job.

    This one has me really upset. I'm really disappointed. I feel like I have two major skills: education and OB, yet one of them (OB) is being allowed to sit on a shelf and atrophy no matter how hard I try.
    I know it sucks now, but I firmly believe these things happen as they are meant to happen.

    I had interviewed for a hospital CM job, at a hospital 7min from home. I really wanted it, and I had been called back after 4 months, apparently the boss did like me, she held my resume. BUT, after making myself available for another interview, at the last minute for her convenience, again, I didn't get it.

    About 8 interviews at other places later, I got a GREAT job as a quality consultant for a managed care company. Great money, great hours, etc... So, who do I run into on my way home from work one night while picking up Chinese food? The beyotch that didn't hire me for that job. Oh yes, I made sure to be very friendly, and chatted her up, of course managing to tell her about my new job and how GREAT it is. I stopped just short of thanking her for leaving me open for this opportunity, lol. Her title is Director of Quality, so I wanted to be sure that while she didn't think I could do a good job because I didn't have "quality experience," I got one even better, and I will never be on-call or work a holiday!

    You have an "in" so that is good. Another spot may open up.

    The job I have now? Well, I worked there 4 years ago, and left after 6 months, so I had to struggle to get back into the fold. Five interviews over a years time for various positions. My current boss, I respect her so much, looked at my resume and said, look, I know nurses are Gypsy's, it doesn't bother me in the least that you have only stayed for short times at several places. Of course, I had no way of knowing that they had hired 4 people who quit after their first audit before me, they are still surprised I haven't run for the hills yet. Today she told me I rocked b/c i got a project done way sooner than she expected, and I said, "I know I do!" Ha!!

    And about finding out in a bad way. While I was in California finishing my BSN clinical for Regent's/Excelsior, totally stressed out beyond belief, they hired a different nurse for the weekend supervisor spot I really really wanted. When I got back, instead of them, the VNA, having the decency to leave me a message to call before I went back in to work, the other person was already announced, and the way I found out was a co-worker coming up to me and announcing the news, and that she knew I applied, when I didn't tell a soul. I was so humiliated, I got my charts together as fast as I could and went out to my car and cried my eyes out. I was a faithful employee, and they treated me like that! And it wasn't bad enough I had to be dissappointed, but they apparently discussed it in a staff meeting, how I had applied, etc... according to the co-worker. She felt so bad later when I told her, she had no idea they hadn't told me. They also turned me down for the quality nurse position a few years later when I applied for that!

    So, keep the faith, when it's right, it will happen. Maybe it is a blessing in disguise. I know mine have turned out that way.
  4. Visit  Q. profile page
    0
    Wow, Hool. Thanks for sharing. I always enjoy reading about other people's experiences with jobs, interviewing, etc. That job where they called you back and then didn't hire you...amazing! I mean, like what was the point?

    I worry about how I look "job-hopping" as well. Though I don't think I have; I've had various positions in various settings but alot of them were concurrent. When interviewers have brought this up I point out that they were concurrent and as such I have a wealth of experience and alot of networking connections at various levels. So far that approach hasn't really panned out though, it seems.

    I've gotten over the disappointment of the Childbirth Ed job and have fully dove into my work here; I've determined that before I leave here, I am going to make myself known and appreciated (long story - basically my "clients" think negatively of the Education Department and typically rip on us every chance they get). I've got a brand new program launching on Monday and am in the middle of preparing for an even bigger one to launch in October (bringing in content expert nurses from local Speaker's Bureau's to present their research). So, I'll be busy and focused for at least 6 months. And that guy is right; we are undergoing alot of corporate changes so hopefully some other opportunity will come along (though I can't see any other opportunity that I'd want more than that childbirth one - )

    I tell ya, managing one's career is alot of work! :chuckle
  5. Visit  llg profile page
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    Quote from Susy K
    I worry about how I look "job-hopping" as well. Though I don't think I have; I've had various positions in various settings but alot of them were concurrent. When interviewers have brought this up I point out that they were concurrent and as such I have a wealth of experience and alot of networking connections at various levels. So far that approach hasn't really panned out though, it seems.

    I'm happy to read that you are emotionally moving on and starting to re-focus on making the most of your current situation.

    One thought about the numerous concurrent jobs: When I read a resume with a lot of concurrent jobs and consider them for a position in my hospital, it raises red flags. I usually view it as more of a negative thing than a positive one. The kinds of questions all those jobs raise in my mind include:

    1. Is this person so scattered in so many directions that they don't give 100% to their primary job?
    2 Will they be giving 100% to the job I have to offer them? ... or will the job I have available have to compete with their other jobs for their attention and energy?
    3. Has this person not yet figured out what they really want to do? Are they just shopping around to get a variety of experiences? Is that all my job will mean to them?
    4. Do they really want to be doing the job I have to offer? ... or do they really want to be doing the type of work they do in those other jobs?

    When I hire someone for a job (particularly a full time job like the one you are seeking), I want someone who will be focused on the job I have hired them to do -- not on too many outside committments. I don't want to have to "wait in line" until those other bosses have been served before it is my turn to get my employee's attention. I want someone fully committed to the job I have to offer them. The higher you move up the ladder, the more your employer will expect you to committ to them and only them (with a few, pre-negotiated exceptions.)

    Your history of concurrent jobs may be giving the impression that you are not fully committed to any one job. That may be part of the reason you are not getting selected for some of the jobs you seek. You could counter that by saying that the concurrent jobs were a thing of the past and that you are now ready to devote yourself to the right job, should it become available.

    Just a thought,
    llg
  6. Visit  Q. profile page
    0
    Quote from llg
    Your history of concurrent jobs may be giving the impression that you are not fully committed to any one job.
    I never thought of that perspective. Interesting.

    I haven't had two jobs concurrently for at least 3-4 years. When I did have concurrent jobs, it was when I was still a L&D nurse, working at two different hospitals with two very different populations or working inpatient care (L&D) and ambulatory care. So I would hope that that would give the impression that I was seeking to broaden my experience with different populations and/or keep my OB skills current. These were actually the reasons I did that. Usually when people have asked, this is what I tell them.

    It's always nice to hear your perspective, llg. For never meeting you in person, you are a great mentor!
  7. Visit  llg profile page
    0
    Thanks, Susy. To me, you seem to be the type of nurse I would want to work with. I respect your opinion and usually check out a thread if I see you have posted in it. Plus, we run into each other a lot because we seem to have a lot of the same interests.

    Keep up the good work. I'm sure the right "fit" will come along eventually. Your experience in multiple settings makes sense to me and I am sure it will make sense to some future employer.

    Have a good weekend,
    llg
  8. Visit  hoolahan profile page
    0
    Quote from llg
    One thought about the numerous concurrent jobs: When I read a resume with a lot of concurrent jobs and consider them for a position in my hospital, it raises red flags. I usually view it as more of a negative thing than a positive one. The kinds of questions all those jobs raise in my mind include:

    1. Is this person so scattered in so many directions that they don't give 100% to their primary job?
    2 Will they be giving 100% to the job I have to offer them? ... or will the job I have available have to compete with their other jobs for their attention and energy?
    3. Has this person not yet figured out what they really want to do? Are they just shopping around to get a variety of experiences? Is that all my job will mean to them?
    4. Do they really want to be doing the job I have to offer? ... or do they really want to be doing the type of work they do in those other jobs?

    When I hire someone for a job (particularly a full time job like the one you are seeking), I want someone who will be focused on the job I have hired them to do -- not on too many outside committments. I don't want to have to "wait in line" until those other bosses have been served before it is my turn to get my employee's attention. I want someone fully committed to the job I have to offer them. The higher you move up the ladder, the more your employer will expect you to committ to them and only them (with a few, pre-negotiated exceptions.)

    Your history of concurrent jobs may be giving the impression that you are not fully committed to any one job. That may be part of the reason you are not getting selected for some of the jobs you seek. You could counter that by saying that the concurrent jobs were a thing of the past and that you are now ready to devote yourself to the right job, should it become available.

    Just a thought,
    llg
    Wow. Interesting to see this perspective. I would encourage you to be more open-minded in that respect. I may only be per diem at one place so I can keep my hand in the clinical work, but no matter where I am, I am very intense and focused. Isn't it better for a manager or chart reviewer to have some personal current bedside experience? That isn't valuable? You may be missing some good people that way.

    I know I have used jobs as a stepping stone, and I would continue to do that and encourage others to do that. I don't sign any contract, and employers make sure you know they are "at-will" employers and can terminate your position for no reason at all. How does that lend itself to longevity? People stay in a place when 1. They feel rewarded, and not just in cash, 2. It is a good match with their personal life, and 3. They are decently compensated and have a hope of a raise in the future. I stayed at one of my jobs, commuting 45 min one-way for 13 years. Why? They treated me like gold. Why did I leave? Because after 13 years on nights, I was starting to have to oull over and sleep on the side of the road after I had kids. And Days didn't work with the kids, so I followed a surgeon to start a program 7 min from home. Only, despite the huge cash incentives, raise and bonuses, it wasn't worth it to tolerate the abuse of the other surgeon. I often wish I had never left that place, but a person, esp a mother, has to do what a person has to do.

    I place all my eggs in the basket of my integrity. If someone opts not to have me for their job because I may have job-hopped in the hopes of bettering myself, and sometimes in order to have a better work schedule, then I can only look at it as their loss. I may have been a t a few places for only 6 months, but I always took my high standards with me. If they don't want to give me a chance, I probably really don't want to work for someone like that anyway.
  9. Visit  Q. profile page
    0
    So to punish myself, again I went browsing around at jobs for an OB/education position. And I came upon THIS from the exact same organization that I just interviewed with:

    Clinical Educator-Perinatal
    Job Category : Nursing

    Hours per Shift : 8

    Shift Start Time : 8 am
    Shift End Time : 4:30 pm
    FTE : .9
    Shift : 1st

    Company : St. Joseph Regional Medical Center

    Department : Education & Development Services

    Requirements : Bachelors Degree in nursing or related field
    Master's degree preferred, 3-4 years acute care experience in perinatal departments.
    In-depth knowledge of nursing process and
    clinical expertise.
    Advanced interpersonal skills, ability to effectively communicate with peers, patients, and physicans.
    In-depth knowledge of adult learning principles.
    Ability to develop and facilitate educational offerings. Must have exceptioal organizational skills. Ability to multi task in a fast paced environment.

    Description : Plans, organizes, implements and evaluates staff development and multimple educational needs for hospital staff. Collaborates with the department leader and educators to plan and implement educational offerings/programs/activities as necessary to meet the needs of the staff.
    Now this reads very similar to the job I just interviewed for, but its not a supervisor/leadership role and is more limited in scope. My guess is, this is a vacancy left from the internal candidate who got the supervisor position. So I applied. :stone
  10. Visit  Q. profile page
    0
    And....got called for an interview.
  11. Visit  nightingale profile page
    0
    Quote from Susy K
    And....got called for an interview.

    I bet it will be SO much easier then the last one!

    Good luck Suzy! You shall be on my prayer list, along with my own for a revamp of career goals.

    Keep us posted!
  12. Visit  Q. profile page
    0
    Ack, I will. I just feel like I'm running in circles. I just want to do more OB related things and that's why I apply for jobs that fit that criteria.

    What's interesting is that during the interview for the supervisor job, along with my lack of supervisory experience they asked if I currently do staff development for OB. When I said basically I span hospital wide and am not dedicated to one particular unit, they asked the question again later..."so do you work with the OB units?"

    The girl who got the job over me was the educator for perinatal services above - the one I'm interviewing for now. It's basically a staff development position but perinatally focused. She also has no supervisory experience either but they hired her most likely because she has more recent OB experience - which is exactly what I was fearing about ME last year. My OB experience looks more like a blip in my career than an actual area of expertise. Which is why I'm applying for this job - to get back into OB more.
  13. Visit  nightingale profile page
    0
    You are way ahead of me Suzy on a focus. I am so broadly trained with my Agency Nursing that to say I am a m/s nurse is a very small part of what I do. I kind of "do it all" but am so ready to focus and concentrate on one area to become really expert.

    It is great you have a focus; now if those employers would only get it together!

    Part of my problem is, I have a problem being dedicated to one company. I want my own company and that is slowwwww going.

    Thanks for the update Suzy. When is your interview?


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