Fastest route to become an RN?

  1. Hi everyone,

    First Question.
    Tell me which fastest route to take to become an RN? AS/BS, it doesn't matter to me.

    BS at a University is faster
    or
    go through Nursing programs at the community colleges and then transfer?
    or
    is it through American Ambulance is faster?

    2nd question.
    To become an LVN, do I have to be CNA first? or does it depends on some programs that I need to be a CNA to qualify into the programs?

    3rd.
    RN-Associate, Do they earn the same like BSN do? depends on where we live I guess huh?
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  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   AngieSC
    RN-Associate, Do they earn the same like BSN do? depends on where we live I guess huh?


    I would like to know that also...I am pretty sure I want to do the BSN program.
  4. by   *PICURN*
    yes, associate degree nurses earn the same as BSN nurses.

    There are a ton of threads that point out the advantages of having a BSN (increased opportunities in management, etc).

    I got my ADN, and now I can work (making RN $$$) while getting my BSN and MSN....

    It's all up to you
  5. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from Homemaker
    Hi everyone,

    First Question.
    Tell me which fastest route to take to become an RN? AS/BS, it doesn't matter to me.

    BS at a University is faster
    or
    go through Nursing programs at the community colleges and then transfer?
    or
    is it through American Ambulance is faster?

    2nd question.
    To become an LVN, do I have to be CNA first? or does it depends on some programs that I need to be a CNA to qualify into the programs?

    3rd.
    RN-Associate, Do they earn the same like BSN do? depends on where we live I guess huh?
    It generally takes less time to get your associate's degree than a BSN. Don't know what American Ambulance is or how you would get a nursing degree from an ambulance.

    You do not need to be a CNA to become an LVN. However, I've heard of nursing schools that require students to become CNA's before the program begins. My school did not require this.

    Techno-Sue
    ADN Semester 3/4
  6. by   maxcat
    Quote from Homemaker
    Hi everyone,

    First Question.
    Tell me which fastest route to take to become an RN? AS/BS, it doesn't matter to me.

    BS at a University is faster
    or
    go through Nursing programs at the community colleges and then transfer?
    or
    is it through American Ambulance is faster?

    2nd question.
    To become an LVN, do I have to be CNA first? or does it depends on some programs that I need to be a CNA to qualify into the programs?

    3rd.
    RN-Associate, Do they earn the same like BSN do? depends on where we live I guess huh?
    If you already have a bachelors degree (in another field), it will probably be faster to get a BSN, esp. if you do an accelerated program. That is what I am looking into-the programs are 12-18 months long (though very intense!). At our local community college (offers an ADN), they strongly recommend getting your CNA before applying to the LPN (LVN) program, and you need your LPN to be admitted to the 1 year ADN program. It sort of ladders up-the whole program is about 2 years (plus CNA is 1 semester-just one class).

    I've heard that the pay difference between an ADN and a BSN isn't much different, but the BSN has more opportunities to move up
  7. by   BETSRN
    Quote from maxcat
    If you already have a bachelors degree (in another field), it will probably be faster to get a BSN, esp. if you do an accelerated program. That is what I am looking into-the programs are 12-18 months long (though very intense!). At our local community college (offers an ADN), they strongly recommend getting your CNA before applying to the LPN (LVN) program, and you need your LPN to be admitted to the 1 year ADN program. It sort of ladders up-the whole program is about 2 years (plus CNA is 1 semester-just one class).

    I've heard that the pay difference between an ADN and a BSN isn't much different, but the BSN has more opportunities to move up
    As far as ADN/BSN, it just depends on what you want to do with your career. In my opinion, it takes a good year for any nurse to feel comfortable with clinical skills and the ADN comes to graduation with far MORE hands on skills than the BSN, for the most part. Personally, I think we do all our BSN grads a disservice in that many come out thinking they are going right into management. They also burn out easily because they have often been ill-prepared for the realities of nursing.
  8. by   maxcat
    Quote from BETSRN
    As far as ADN/BSN, it just depends on what you want to do with your career. In my opinion, it takes a good year for any nurse to feel comfortable with clinical skills and the ADN comes to graduation with far MORE hands on skills than the BSN, for the most part. Personally, I think we do all our BSN grads a disservice in that many come out thinking they are going right into management. They also burn out easily because they have often been ill-prepared for the realities of nursing.
    You know, I had heard that as well, but when I talked to the instructor of my CNA course, she said I should go for the BSN and not the ADN. It's hard to get a feel of what is the right thing to do b/c I get conflicting info from everyone. For me (already have a BA and a MS in another field), I I want to have good clinical skills, but also the ability to get a master's if I wanted to. Here's my question: If you already have a bachelors and a master's (in another field), and you get an ADN, can you go straight to a master's in nursing? Or do you have to get a BSN first? I get conflicting info on this as well, though maybe it depends on the program.
  9. by   Homemaker
    Hey thanks everyone,
    I did some research and some schools do require becoming CNA first, which sucks becuz u have to work for 6mnths as a CNA b4 getting into the LVN programs. but after all that, you can transfer to city /university and easily get into the program to continue for BSN wout waiting. is that true?

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