Cruise Nurse Great job - page 3

by phdr

6,983 Views | 27 Comments

Hi , Just was wondering if at all any one has ever thought of working on one of the biggest cruise lines.... Read More


  1. 0
    I tinkered with the idea at one point. 24/7 call was an immediate dealbreaker. No thanks.
  2. 0
    Quote from skylark
    I just accepted a job on a cruise ship, it seems from the comments above that it varies from company to company.
    What they all seem to have in common is -
    Yes, they run as a mini ER, with anywhere from 1-3 docs and 1-6 nurses, depending on the size of the ship.
    Yes, they deal with all emergencies, (cardiacs are thrombolysed, there is no facility for other interventions), but there is no surgery, that requires a quick exit, either via helicopter or to the nearest port.
    Yes, people die out there, But for many its their choice. I had not heard of this before, but for elderly who live alone, they want to end their days being looked after, rather than die alone and maybe not even be found for days, they cruise with the intention of dying at sea. There is morgue in each ship.
    Yes, they require 3 years ER and also ACLS.
    Yes, you are on call 24/7 although your working day can be as short as 4 hours. With only a small team, the solo duty nurse often need assistance, even if just for a few minutes to turn a patient or check some IVs.
    But your cabin is just a few yards from the med center, so you go turn the patient, check their pressure areas and dish out the meds then stand down again . . .
    The money must vary by company, as what I have been quoted is far better than the figure I find here. Basic is $3000 per month, and there is also commission, based on the number of patients you treat, which earns you anything from $500 to $1200 a month on top of basic. And its all tax free as its offshore.
    Accomodation, meals and laundry are all included in the package. You have to pay your own living costs when on leave, which is typically around 16 weeks a year.

    I wanted to do this years ago but family committments meant it could not work. Now as an empty nester, I decided to go for it, otherwise I will always say "If only...."

    I set sail in January . . . .
    Super Excited for you Skylark! I think I'd love to do this someday! Someday when I'm an empty nester, soooo I've got 15 1/2 years to go, but I'm guessing that numbers gonna change in the next year, so I'll say 20 Just Curious, Is there a preference for a BSN or higher degree???
  3. 0
    Quote from skylark
    I just accepted a job on a cruise ship, it seems from the comments above that it varies from company to company.What they all seem to have in common is - Yes, they run as a mini ER, with anywhere from 1-3 docs and 1-6 nurses, depending on the size of the ship.Yes, they deal with all emergencies, (cardiacs are thrombolysed, there is no facility for other interventions), but there is no surgery, that requires a quick exit, either via helicopter or to the nearest port.Yes, people die out there, But for many its their choice. I had not heard of this before, but for elderly who live alone, they want to end their days being looked after, rather than die alone and maybe not even be found for days, they cruise with the intention of dying at sea. There is morgue in each ship.Yes, they require 3 years ER and also ACLS.Yes, you are on call 24/7 although your working day can be as short as 4 hours. With only a small team, the solo duty nurse often need assistance, even if just for a few minutes to turn a patient or check some IVs.But your cabin is just a few yards from the med center, so you go turn the patient, check their pressure areas and dish out the meds then stand down again . . . The money must vary by company, as what I have been quoted is far better than the figure I find here. Basic is $3000 per month, and there is also commission, based on the number of patients you treat, which earns you anything from $500 to $1200 a month on top of basic. And its all tax free as its offshore.Accomodation, meals and laundry are all included in the package. You have to pay your own living costs when on leave, which is typically around 16 weeks a year.I wanted to do this years ago but family committments meant it could not work. Now as an empty nester, I decided to go for it, otherwise I will always say "If only...."I set sail in January . . . .
    . Wooohooo! Congrats and keep in touch. I am so going to do this when teenagers out of house.
  4. 0
    For basically being on call, the pay isn't that great, IMO. Obviously, to each his own, but I make on average 4500 a month. I had a friend who worked housekeeping management on one of the ships. Three months into her contract, she hated it. After her stories, I re-evaluated my views about cruise ships.
  5. 0
    Hi Skylark,

    I see from your post that you embarked on Cruise nursing in 2012. I was wondering if you'd tell me about your experience now? I've always been interested in this type of nursing. I have only 2+ years of medicine experience in a acute care hospital with no ACLS training but would be willing to do more in order to get a job cruise nursing. Do you mind telling me what you, or other nurses had as background in nursing before your departure? I'd appreciate answers to any of the above questions

    Thanks!!
  6. 0
    I didnt stay very long.
    Not so much the work, it was pretty routine and definitely not challenging, but just the boredom of living underwater and rarely seeing daylight.
    12 hour shifts, some of which can be on call rather than in the med center, but I got bored quickly, it was more like home health than anything else, lots of unwell COPDs, some chronic wound management, but mostly diarrhea!
    The ship only spends a few hours in each port, and the crew are the last to leave and the first back, so often I only had one or two hours in a port, barely enough time to clear security and leave the port. We could not all leave at every port, it was a rota basis for which nurse went shore at which port.
    My cabin was comfortable enough, but it was next to the med center, and the dining room was on the same corridor, so most of the time it was more like living in a submarine than a ship.
    I think this job would be fun for a couple or a group of friends, who are happy spending their time off socializing on their own corridor, and don't have any great desire to explore.
  7. 0
    Hi guys have been given a job as a RN ont he cruise ship Eltion from carnival...... Has anyone worked on this ship?? I am excited and nervous too. Any advise would help please .....!!!!
  8. 0
    Quote from nicobear3
    Hi guys have been given a job as a RN ont he cruise ship Eltion from carnival...... Has anyone worked on this ship?? I am excited and nervous too. Any advise would help please .....!!!!
    Welcome to Diarrhea City.


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