BSN School advice? So appreciated... thanks!!

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    Hi, thanks for reading! I'm currently having trouble with the decision to turn down admission to Johns Hopkins SON for an accelerated bachelor's. If I turn it down, I won't be paying 90K+ for a BSN (a pro). But I'll also have to wait three more years to graduate, and I'll be going to Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), which I don't know much about but I'm sure is fine, if not as prestigious as Johns Hopkins. (a possible con)
    It seems not to matter where the BSN comes from... is this really true?
    My ultimate goals are to work as an L&D nurse for a few years while my husband & I start our family, then go on to a midwifery program (most likely Frontier) later in life.
    I currently have a bachelor's degree in Neuroscience from Oberlin College, which means I already have some loans in repayment! I'm only 22, and the idea of so much debt is overwhelming but I want to make the right decision for my future/career.
    Am I making a good decision to wait and go to VCU instead of Johns Hopkins?

    Thank you in advance for any input/advice.
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  3. 4 Comments so far...

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    To get started in nursing, there's not usually much to be gained by spending extra money on a big name school. It's not like some areas of study where having graduated from a big name school means major networking resources in landing that first job. In fact, some of the most reputable nursing programs (that is, the ones that turn out the most clinically prepared grads) are non-BSN programs. Also, some hiring managers are wary of accelerated program grads as these programs are still new in many places and don't have a proven track record yet. Another consideration is that many graduates of all sorts of nursing programs don't feel really ready to start work as a professional upon graduation; while an accelerated program may provide all that is necessary to get a nursing license and start working within a year, the extra time as a student certainly won't hurt one's confidence in the transition to professional. Finally, having extra time as a student also allows a student to take advantage of being a student - such as working a student nurse extern or working as a nursing assistant while a student. Those can be valuable experiences to build confidence, explore different areas that you may want to pursue in the future, and to get a foot in the door.
    nurse2B444 likes this.
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    They are both good programs associated with good hospitals.
    The difference, one costs more and is more widely known throughout the US. Where you get your nursing degree does not play a single factor in where you can get a job or the number of opportunities.
    I have my RN from a diploma program and I had more experience than many other BSN grads because they received half the clinical experience I did.
    A key factor, find out how much clinical time is spent in the hospital. Both programs are associated with hospitals, so you will most likely have clinical priority over other local programs. Find out who offers the most clinical experience.
    Also check out the percentage of their NCLEX pass rate. My school had a 99% pass rate!
    Overall, he reputation and cost of the school will not affect your nursing career. I would suggest to more on the prestigious schools for your advance practice.
    nurse2B444 likes this.
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    I absolutely agree with previous posters. Please, don't burden yourself with this crushing student loan debt. It just doesn't make sense for a job that will pay (at best) no more than $60k for a few years.

    Everyone takes the same NCLEX. Undergrad degrees are pretty much interchangeable. I also am in total agreement with the advice to be very cautious about accelerated degrees. My organization is very wary of them because we have found that they do not provide adequate clinical preparation.

    Good Luck! Keep us posted on your progress.
    nurse2B444 likes this.
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    Quote from rbezemek
    I absolutely agree with previous posters. Please, don't burden yourself with this crushing student loan debt. It just doesn't make sense for a job that will pay (at best) no more than $60k for a few years.

    Everyone takes the same NCLEX. Undergrad degrees are pretty much interchangeable. I also am in total agreement with the advice to be very cautious about accelerated degrees. My organization is very wary of them because we have found that they do not provide adequate clinical preparation.

    Good Luck! Keep us posted on your progress.

    Thank you so much for your post. I have definitely decided not to go to JH at this point. I hope the VCU program is adequate clinically... it's 5 consecutive semesters, the last 4 of which include clinical components. The school recommends not working during the accelerated program, due to the large number of clinical hours required. So, I hope all of that adds up to a program that will prepare me. Thank you all for your input!:redpinkhe


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