Prevalence of Christians in the field of nursing - page 12

by FSUNurse2b 14,263 Views | 115 Comments

I will be making a career change, from the banking industry to nursing. Thought about it over the past year. In my industry, Christians are far and few between. I suppose much of this has to do with the main focus being,... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    When you start to work as a RN you are going to find that people are not that amicable. If you work for a religious facility...they will have a different point of view about praying with the patients versus a facility that is not religious.

    As a nurse your job is NOT about you it is about your patients. Your point of view, thoughts, private life, political views are NOT for the bedside. The spiritual care of patients means you are patient and kind. You do not judge nor participate. You advocate to contact their clergy, family, or offer a patient ear...TO LISTEN to the patient. It is not to share your thoughts or opinions, views or offer prayer. YOU will quickly find yourself in a tricky place when even the kindest patient reports you for unprofessional behavior. It WILL cost you your job.

    You can take this advice or not...it is up to you. I have been a nurse for a very LONG time and trust me when I say it WILL blow up in your face someday and it WILL cost you your job.

    There are areas of nursing, Like Parrish nursing where prayer and religion re an expected part of the job. Just be very careful about who and when you are offering prayer.
    TWhat I am taking from you is that you never would sit and pray with the patient. That is fair, if the nurse feels uncomfortable, I understand. Not everyone is religious. If the patient is asking for prayer, that is the only time I'd offer it. I know several nurses that have to someone who requested it. No, it is never for me to sit and judge someones belief or convert them.

    Also, I never said that someone who is not religious can provide excellent care. I am sure there are just as many poor nonreligious nurses as Christian nurses. Someone who is incompetent is that way regardless if their white, black, hispanic, Jewish, etc.

    But, everyone is motivated somehow to do their job. Whether it be a passion, stable job, or religious beliefs.
  2. 5
    Quote from cd365c
    TWhat I am taking from you is that you never would sit and pray with the patient. That is fair, if the nurse feels uncomfortable, I understand. Not everyone is religious. If the patient is asking for prayer, that is the only time I'd offer it. I know several nurses that have to someone who requested it. No, it is never for me to sit and judge someones belief or convert them.

    Also, I never said that someone who is not religious can provide excellent care. I am sure there are just as many poor nonreligious nurses as Christian nurses. Someone who is incompetent is that way regardless if their white, black, hispanic, Jewish, etc.

    But, everyone is motivated somehow to do their job. Whether it be a passion, stable job, or religious beliefs.
    I NEVER said I have not prayed with a patients or family. I NEVER said I wasn't religious. I never said I was uncomfortable with prayer. I have NOT offered up my beliefs. Nor will I. You are making assumptions...nurses do not make assumptions.

    I respect all beliefs even if they are contrary to my own. As long as they patients family doesn't want to sacrifice a live animal in the room...I'm down with whatever they believe helps.

    What I am saying, and this especially applies to acute care, it can come back and bite you in the behind even if you had the best intentions. The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

    When a patient asks me to pray with them I will bow my head in respect. Silently. I might quietly say the lords prayer if that is what the patient is saying...but I offer up no individual prayer myself. I will call pastoral care to minister to their religious needs. I prefer to stay below the radar and controversy free....most of the time.

    My personal beliefs and drive to be a nurse is personal to me and do not belong at the bedside.
    OCNRN63, LadyFree28, PMFB-RN, and 2 others like this.
  3. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    I NEVER said I have not prayed with a patients or family. I NEVER said I wasn't religious. I never said I was uncomfortable with prayer. I have NOT offered up my beliefs. Nor will I. You are making assumptions...nurses do not make assumptions.

    I respect all beliefs even if they are contrary to my own. As long as they patients family doesn't want to sacrifice a live animal in the room...I'm down with whatever they believe helps.

    What I am saying, and this especially applies to acute care, it can come back and bite you in the behind even if you had the best intentions. The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

    When a patient asks me to pray with them I will bow my head in respect. Silently. I might quietly say the lords prayer if that is what the patient is saying...but I offer up no individual prayer myself. I will call pastoral care to minister to their religious needs. I prefer to stay below the radar and controversy free....most of the time.

    My personal beliefs and drive to be a nurse is personal to me and do not belong at the bedside.
    Yes, you are correct that I made many assumptions. I did not mean for it to come off as a personal attack. Remaining as you put it "controversy free" is something I really need to grow in. Young and cocky as I am, I tend to make many quick judgements.

    I don't know yet how I will handle future occurances. I definitely want to dicuss it with people who have similar ideas and ideology as me.

    Your views while I don't completely agree really have given me something to think about. Thanks!
  4. 3
    Quote from Esme12
    I respect all beliefs even if they are contrary to my own. As long as they patients family doesn't want to sacrifice a live animal in the room...I'm down with whatever they believe helps.
    I feel the same way. However I would add one more condition to your no "sacrificing live animals". Also no lighting of fires in my ICU room.
    I once arranged for a native healer to preform a ceremony that my American Indian patient requested. I called the patient's family and asked them to bring several things for the ceremony that the patient requested. They showed up, as did the native healer. I left them alone to preform their ceremony and closed the sliding glass door to the room. I thought I smelled smoke coming from the room. Just as I went to check the fire alarm went off! When I entered the room I found they had quite a large fire going in a clay bowl. I got the fire out but my nurse manager wasn't very happy with me at all.
    Needless to say after that I questioned people wanting to preform ceremonies very closely before I agreed to allow it to happen.
  5. 7
    Quote from MariposaLPN
    You may not agree with her, but I do. Per the Bible we are to "go out into the world and preach the gospel to all nations. " That doesn't mean hammer down someone's throat, but it's essentially what we're called to do. It saddens me when I hear a fellow Christian state: " I don't mention God at work. I just keep it to myself. " Even if the CNA says: "God loves you, it shouldn't be a huge problem, especially if patients request it.

    It's inappropriate to use a time when someone is ill and in the hospital to proselytize. The imbalance of power in the nurse : patient relationship may put the patient in an uncomfortable position, leaving him/her to wonder if the nurse will take care of his/her needs if the nurse's testimony is rejected.

    Not all patients may believe as you do. Saying to an atheist patient, "God loves you" would not be helpful. Whose needs are being met in that case? The patient's? The nurse's?

    ​There are many other opportunities a true believer can take to preach to "people of all nations."
    Last edit by OCNRN63 on Sep 14
    NRSKarenRN, LadyFree28, Rose_Queen, and 4 others like this.
  6. 3
    I know that this thread is older than Methusalah, but I was very upset by this statement. I find the idea that Christians might be more likely than adherents of other religions to be called to care for the sick to be more than a little bit insulting to non-Christian religions. Jesus did not invent the idea of caring for the weak.


    Quote from FSUNurse2b
    tnbutterfly,

    Thank you. My question was not clear. I was getting at the prevalence of other Christian nurses (employees) within the workplace. I agree with your comment on geographical location. Just wasn't sure if the field of nursing perhaps drew more Christians to it's ranks due to the nature of the job.
    LadyFree28, elkpark, and PMFB-RN like this.


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