Long Working Hours, Safety, and Health:



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    your attendance at this innovative conference (april 29-30, 2004) will give you the opportunity to participate in creating a cutting edge research agenda that promises to guide the work in this field for years to come. using a multi-disciplinary approach, sociological, economic, and health dimensions of long work hours will be explored. you will understand the impact long working hours is having on occupational safety, health, and well-being and learn about current and emerging interventions in this field.

    the ana is co-sponsoring a special half-day session on friday, april 30, 2004 (1:30-4:30 pm) to specifically discuss the issue of long working hours in nursing. contact hours for this half-day session provided by ana center for continuing education.

    sponsors: university of maryland school of nursing, national institute for occupational safety and health, u.s. department of justice, and american nurses association (added half-day session focused on nursing) for more information, go to: http://nursing.umaryland.edu/longworkhours.
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  3. by   NRSKarenRN
    from ana news: www.ana.org

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    3/08/04
    this fall, nevada state college at henderson will launch an accelerated nursing program, designed primarily for people looking for a career change. those who already have college degrees and who have taken a couple of required prerequisites can complete what is normally a two-year program in one year and leave with a bachelor of science degree in nursing.

    robert rosseter, a spokesman for the american association of colleges of nursing, said there are 130 accelerated baccalaureate nursing programs nationwide, with about 50 more in the planning stages.

    "given the nursing shortage, this is a very smart option for schools to consider," said rosseter. "it's right on a lot of levels."

    there is a severe shortage of nurses nationwide, and nevada ranks at the bottom of the list. the state has about 520 nurses per 100,000 people; the national average is 782. read complete article at
    www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2004/mar-01-mon-2004/news/23303815.html.

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