Venting about BON involvement in DUI

  1. 3
    I am writing this because I am irritated that in the nursing field if you receive a DUI during your off duty time it can (and usually will) seriously affect your career. I have a colleague who has been nursing for over 40 years, they have never put patients in danger, and have never been intoxicated on shift. Yet this person receives a DUI and the BON immediately treats this person as if they are the scum of the earth. This is only one example of several that I could share. Nursing seems to be the only job, outside of the military, where if you get a DUI in your off time it directly affects your career. With the changes in state DUI laws and the greater enforcement of those laws this is a serious issue. I feel that the members of the BON are out to crucify people for making human mistakes. I understand that we can't have intoxicated nurse's on the floor taking care of patients but if it doesn't involve patient care/safety the BON should keep their #$%#ed nose out of nurses' business. I am afraid to go out and have 1 beer/glass of wine because I'm worried that if I get stopped for some trivial traffic violation I will wind up losing my nursing license. Back to my colleague, the BON put restrictions on their license, required the monthly random UA's and when the lab failed to file their paperwork in time, REVOKED my colleague's license. With the nursing shortage, this practice seems to be one more case of the system shooting itsself in the foot. This is my opinion and I wanted to see how others felt on the subject. And please spare me the "Morals" speech because it has nothing to do with morals.
    lwalk1963, kat3, and lolalolacherrycola like this.
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  4. 18
    Quote from Nursing NCO
    . And please spare me the "Morals" speech because it has nothing to do with morals.

    Hate to disappoint you here but here it goes, like it or not.



    Driving while drunk absolutely has everything to do with morals. You (or your friend) endangers everyone's life on the road because you (or they) wanted to have a good time.



    Too bad.

    Don't drink and drive, and you won't have to worry about your license. Drink at home.




    There you go.
    poppycat, Pixie.RN, Meriwhen, and 15 others like this.
  5. 13
    Being a ER nurse and seeing the devastation caused by people who get behind the wheel intoxicated means I have little/no sympathy for anyone DUI.
    I have been a nurse for 6 years and know the ramifications of driving under the influence therefore I do not do it. I have a designated driver set up or just drink at home.
    I don't see how anyone can justify driving drunk these days and if I was stupid enough to do it I think yanking my license would be justified
    FLAME ME IF YOU WANT
    poppycat, Tessaprn, blueheaven, and 10 others like this.
  6. 3
    I understand the ramifications of driving intoxicated as well, and I am not saying that you shouldn't be punished criminally I am all for the increased enforcement of DUI laws, first time ignition interlock devices and mandatory jail time. What I am saying is that I believe if it does not affect patient safety/care that the BON should not be involved. If it is a felony offense different story. Also a correction to my previous post, teachers may also lose their certifications.

    Also consider this, if you have ever driven drowsy. "The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that 100,000 of reported crashes occur as a result of drowsiness, and considers sleep deprived drivers a hazard equal in severity to drunk drivers. Studies show that staying awake for 18 hours and driving produces the same effect as being legally drunk behind the wheel. The greater the sleep deprivation, the closer the correlation to higher levels of intoxication." Obtained from Safety.com. Now my question is this, how does the BON look upon a non-substance abuse related DWI?
  7. 8
    Not many ways needed to get the point across. If anyone receives a DUI in any profession they are "scum of the earth." Being in the Nursing profession even makes it worst for the individual's stupidity. Drive drunk and you put everyone around you in danger. I lack total sympathy or any understanding with anyone who does this. I have raised 4 kids and they knew if they ever were stopped for any type of DUI they best use their one phone call to call someone other than me.

    A nurse who drinks and drives obviously has no respect for their own lives. I surely do not need a nurse with that lifestyle caring for mine or anyone elses well-being. The BON is doing exactly what they are suppose to do. Did you ever wonder why one of the questions that is asked on the license application is in regard to arrests for DUI?

    DRIVING DRUNK IS NOT A HUMAN MISTAKE. No excuses. You tell your "colleague" they received from the BON exactly was was deserved. I cannot see any nurse that uses this board giving you any other type of reply other than maybe nicer.
    Cherybaby, Spidey's mom, sallyrnrrt, and 5 others like this.
  8. 6
    Having been in AA for 25+ years, one thing was drilled into my pea-brained head early in my sobriety and that was "I am responsible".
    Through the grace of God, I somehow managed not to injure, hurt, maim or kill anyone while I was drinking and driving.
    Unfortunately being a Nurse or a Doctor and being convicted for DUI is a serious threat to ones License to Practice in most, if not all 50 States. Right or wrong that's the way it is. So one must deal with the consequences (I am responsible).

    Personally I do think Nurses and Doctors should be held to a higher standard.

    It is a crime to be driving Under the influence wanna play? get caught.....gotta pay!!

    Mark
    Nurse Wannabe
  9. 6
    If you read any statistics on DUI's, the average drunk driver drives drunk about 80 to 90 times before they get caught.

    Most of the time, from what I understand...you get into more trouble if the BON finds out about the DUI rather than reporting it, which in most states you are supposed to report any criminal conviction to the BON unless it's a minor traffic violation...a DUI is considered major.

    I think your friend is pulling your leg.

    No nurse is going to get their license revoked because a lab didn't send it paperwork on time. If they did, it should have been temporary and fixed in a matter of a couple of days.

    Any time I have ever had to got to a lab, they ALWAYS give you a receipt so you can prove you have been there and one what day, and what for.

    That should have been enough to clear your friend.
    Tessaprn, llg, Spidey's mom, and 3 others like this.
  10. 3
    Quote from BabyLady
    If you read any statistics on DUI's, the average drunk driver drives drunk about 80 to 90 times before they get caught.

    Most of the time, from what I understand...you get into more trouble if the BON finds out about the DUI rather than reporting it, which in most states you are supposed to report any criminal conviction to the BON unless it's a minor traffic violation...a DUI is considered major.

    I think your friend is pulling your leg.

    No nurse is going to get their license revoked because a lab didn't send it paperwork on time. If they did, it should have been temporary and fixed in a matter of a couple of days.

    Any time I have ever had to got to a lab, they ALWAYS give you a receipt so you can prove you have been there and one what day, and what for.

    That should have been enough to clear your friend.
    I agree with this. No matter what you think, it is not as simple as the lab losing paperwork so the nurse got her license revoked. It is never that simple.
    Tessaprn, Spidey's mom, and sallyrnrrt like this.
  11. 8
    Quote from Nursing NCO
    I am writing this because I am irritated that in the nursing field if you receive a DUI during your off duty time it can (and usually will) seriously affect your career. I have a colleague who has been nursing for over 40 years, they have never put patients in danger, and have never been intoxicated on shift. Yet this person receives a DUI and the BON immediately treats this person as if they are the scum of the earth. This is only one example of several that I could share. Nursing seems to be the only job, outside of the military, where if you get a DUI in your off time it directly affects your career. With the changes in state DUI laws and the greater enforcement of those laws this is a serious issue. I feel that the members of the BON are out to crucify people for making human mistakes. I understand that we can't have intoxicated nurse's on the floor taking care of patients but if it doesn't involve patient care/safety the BON should keep their #$%#ed nose out of nurses' business. I am afraid to go out and have 1 beer/glass of wine because I'm worried that if I get stopped for some trivial traffic violation I will wind up losing my nursing license. Back to my colleague, the BON put restrictions on their license, required the monthly random UA's and when the lab failed to file their paperwork in time, REVOKED my colleague's license. With the nursing shortage, this practice seems to be one more case of the system shooting itsself in the foot. This is my opinion and I wanted to see how others felt on the subject. And please spare me the "Morals" speech because it has nothing to do with morals.
    My best friend's 18 year old son was killed by a drunk driver, so, yes, she would probably say that drunk drivers are the 'scum of the Earth'.
  12. 0
    Posted by Nursing NCO
    Nursing seems to be the only job, outside of the military, where if you get a DUI in your off time it directly affects your career.

    Well no it isn't, I did mention Doctors, but the list also includes Police, Fire, Correction, Therapists (especially substance abuse type therapists) CNA's/LNA's and other personnel.

    Mark


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