Venting about BON involvement in DUI - page 7

:banghead:I am writing this because I am irritated that in the nursing field if you receive a DUI during your off duty time it can (and usually will) seriously affect your career. I have a colleague... Read More

  1. Visit  blondnursey profile page
    0
    yes, i am not saying that its ok to drink and drive.
    i am saying that after you do all the court appointed stuff, the bon steps in and some of those programs take 4 years to go through. they have a blanket policy which isnt fair to everybody. theres .08 and then there is .227. big difference.
    the punishment should be specific to your problem.
  2. Visit  lwalk1963 profile page
    0
    AMEN!! If you get a DUI, you will be paying a hefty price anyway!! The board of nursing has no right to but into your life!! I totally agree that as long as you were not working, it's nobody's business what you do!!!!!!!!!!!
  3. Visit  hherrn profile page
    1
    an interesting thread, mainly because of how strongly some people feel about this.

    many have expressed the opinion that the bon has no business investigating incidents outside work. do you really believe this? would you be comfortable working with a convicted pedophile? to be clear about this: i am not equating pedophilia and drunk driving. my point is that of course the bon should look at some incidents outside the work environment. the only question is where you draw the line.

    every bon draws the line in a different place. in other words, every bon clearly spells out what may or may not be considered an actionable offense. so- if it's important to you to work in a state in which dui is not a consideration for nursing license, go there.

    i personally believe marijuana should be legal. i believe it is far safer than many legal substances. i know quite a few marijuana users whose judgment, while unimpaired, i fully trust. i also know that if i smoke marijuana, i might lose my license. s0- i don't smoke marijuana. if you smoke a little pot outside work, i won't think less of you as a nurse. i also won't have much sympathy if you lose your license.

    some people have pointed out how easy it is to accidentally drive while over the legal limit. the equation for figuring out blood alcohol levels relate to volume, concentration, weight, and time. this calculation is a lot simpler than many medication calculations. if you can't do this calculation, you probably shouldn't be a nurse.

    just my thoughts.

    btw- to the poster who cited the statistic that 65% of men over 35 have at least one dui. interesting statistic. source?
    Tessaprn likes this.
  4. Visit  time4meRN profile page
    1
    i agree. not just for nursing but in other areas as well. you are right.. we do not want impaired nurses working. however, i do feel like " big brother " is going too far. if someone shows up to work impaired, do a drug screen go from there. if the bon is able to punish on bad judgment , than when will they start punishing for multiple sex parteners, poor financial judgment, divorce, driving home after a 12 hour shift with no break, driving home after a night shift and no sleep in 24 hours, driving home emotinally upset because a child died in your er so on and so on. nureses are human, if you are a nurse that has never made a poor decision than you are either a liar or god. a dui should be punished as the law states but no further. it seems we are spinning our wheels in this country trying to fix everything with new laws and constant threat. it baffles me how the rich and famous can get away with almost anything yet the average joe is pounded. don't get me wrong i adore mj but can you imagine what would have come of the average person if there were even a hint of doctor shopping let alone the amt of drugs he had available to him. we have the ability to pull up name, social , address, drivers license no etc to see how many narcs a pt got over the last year, yet some how all was missed for him. go figure. too bad it was overlooked, maybe he could have found some peace in his life too. namess
    Last edit by time4meRN on Sep 14, '09
    jeff3852 likes this.
  5. Visit  VM85 profile page
    1
    I believe it shows your judgment- and why should someone with poor judgment that may have killed someone be able to take care of patients! Yes even nurses are human and make mistakes- but even if this is the first "mistake" made the person still could have killed or seriously hurt her or someone else!
    Tessaprn likes this.
  6. Visit  softstorms profile page
    3
    I have read thru 6 pages of text....and it all come down to personal responsibility! Nothing or no-one changed anything for you. You made a choice. You had a moment in time when you thought it would be O.K. and it was not. Now...you spend all this time looking for justice! Sometimes...when we make a mistake....the answer is just NO! Believe that and move on.
  7. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    Quote from exnursie
    Anyone who drinks and drives is making a POOR decision and and risking not only their safety but the safety of anyone who happens to be on the same road as they are. This is enough reason for the BON to be concerned, and to take action.

    Each state BON provides specific lists of what they will investigate, and includes many situations, including any criminal activity, not paying student loans, not paying child support, not filing state taxes all which have nothing to do with pt safety but do involve personal responsibility, integrity and ( a favorite expression in many states) " matters of "moral turpitude".

    What many nurss fail to grasp is that they are held to certain standards that include more than just their time on the job. It was repeated over and over when I was a student, maybe this is not included in the present day nursing school curriculums??
    the bold has nothing to do with "moral turpitude" and everything to do with the state using your lic to force payment....
  8. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    Quote from hherrn
    an interesting thread, mainly because of how strongly some people feel about this.

    many have expressed the opinion that the bon has no business investigating incidents outside work. do you really believe this? would you be comfortable working with a convicted pedophile? to be clear about this: i am not equating pedophilia and drunk driving. my point is that of course the bon should look at some incidents outside the work environment. the only question is where you draw the line.

    every bon draws the line in a different place. in other words, every bon clearly spells out what may or may not be considered an actionable offense. so- if it's important to you to work in a state in which dui is not a consideration for nursing license, go there.

    i personally believe marijuana should be legal. i believe it is far safer than many legal substances. i know quite a few marijuana users whose judgment, while unimpaired, i fully trust. i also know that if i smoke marijuana, i might lose my license. s0- i don't smoke marijuana. if you smoke a little pot outside work, i won't think less of you as a nurse. i also won't have much sympathy if you lose your license.

    some people have pointed out how easy it is to accidentally drive while over the legal limit. the equation for figuring out blood alcohol levels relate to volume, concentration, weight, and time. this calculation is a lot simpler than many medication calculations. if you can't do this calculation, you probably shouldn't be a nurse.

    just my thoughts.

    btw- to the poster who cited the statistic that 65% of men over 35 have at least one dui. interesting statistic. source?
    please cite the equation.....and specify if it is live wt, and the dif between male/female
  9. Visit  LovebugLPN profile page
    3
    No matter how we view this topic and try to persuade people to come to our side on this it doesn't matter. The BON has made the decision and when you decided to become a nurse you knew the rules. If you didn't like all the restrictions and wanted to keep saying "it's not fair" like a bunch of 4 year olds you should have walked out of the classroom on day one. If you hate it now you can leave the profession and let some new grads who are looking for jobs have yours or you can suck it up and stop acting like frat boys.
  10. Visit  formerarch profile page
    0
    I'm firmly in the middle on this. DUI's are serious and should be treated more harshly to make them sink in. But taking away somebody's livelihood is another matter. Forcing everyone with a DUI to give up their careers and spend the rest of their lives working menial labor is Dickensian at best.

    The vast majority of DUI's don't destroy anybody's life. Just like the vast majority of people who text or use their phones while driving. Each situation is different and should be treated as such, addressing the problem rather than simply dumping people into good/bad categories.

    And it needs to be drilled into everybody's head that operating 4500 pounds of metal at high rates of speed is a responsibility, not a right.
  11. Visit  Tessaprn profile page
    0
    BON job is to ensure patient safety. With substance abuse (drugs or alcohol) BON is in their right to disclipline however they see fit. At one time nurses did not have any options except to lose their license. Now they promote rehab. You would actually be stunned to know how many people who are nurses are substance abusers and the number of nurses who enter rehab and relapse and return to rehab and relapse a second or third time. This I assume is why the probation period is 5 years or longer.

    A nurse gets the oportunity to attend rehab when you have a DUI or drug abuse. It's better to turn yourself in rather than be turned in. Years ago people did not get a second chance.
    Last edit by sirI on Jul 11, '10
  12. Visit  luvche profile page
    1
    I think the BON looks at it like this: If you are drinking enough where you thought it was a good idea to try to drive, then you aren't making clear decisions. If you aren't making good decisions in your personal life, how do they know that won't trickle into your professional life. The way they put it to me is, they absolutely have a duty to stop nurses who may end up being a danger to the public. (Again, if you make bad personal decisions, what stops you from making bad professional ones). All they care about is making sure they are keeping patients safe. If they feel a nurse can be unsafe, based on decisions they make, they have a right to pull license.

    It may seem like an invasion of provacy. But let's say your family member gets injured or dead based on a mistake made by a nurse. Let's say it was either due to intoxication at work, or NOT being intoxicated...but a true accident. If you later found out this person has a DUI history, and was never investigated, I bet you would be saying "see?! There is a clue that nurse may not be safe, and no one did anything"
    Or maybe you wouldn't say that. I am an alcoholic RN in recovery...and I would STILL be asking that if it happened to me. Even as an alcoholic....I can tell you I refused to drive after drinking. It coulda been one isolated incident...but the BON doesn't know that. It could be proof of how cloudy their drinking has made their judgement...even when they aren't drinking.

    I know I only drank on weekends. But my fame of mind and thinking were being affected even throughout the week. My job suffered, thgouh i never went in drunk or hungover (I only worked weekdays). So really, they can't be sure it is an isolated "mistake"

    Probably not what you wanted to hear. Sometimes I wish BON would but out of my recovery. But they have a duty to the public. They can't pick and choose which incidents are isolated and which indicate a problem and which indicate the start of a problem
    RN4HUGS likes this.

Need Help Searching For Someone's Comment? Enter your keywords in the box below and we will display any comment that matches your keywords.



Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top
close
close