Yale's program - page 2

I am going to be attending Yale's FNP program in the fall. I was wondering if anyone has any info about the program they would like to share. Thank you!... Read More

  1. by   NHavenRN
    I found that by working as an RN while I was completing the program I didn't have any trouble finding a job; no one I interviewed with had a problem that it was part-time as opposed to full-time nursing work. I also didn't face any trouble with the fact I didn't earn a BSN through my program. I know it's strange, but I think Yale has some sort of irrational reason why it can't offer a BSN (partly related to the fact that it doesn't have an undergrad program, and all undergraduates are Yale College students...and the nursing school and Yale College and completely separate entities).
  2. by   smile123
    Quote from NHavenRN
    I found that by working as an RN while I was completing the program I didn't have any trouble finding a job; no one I interviewed with had a problem that it was part-time as opposed to full-time nursing work. I also didn't face any trouble with the fact I didn't earn a BSN through my program. I know it's strange, but I think Yale has some sort of irrational reason why it can't offer a BSN (partly related to the fact that it doesn't have an undergrad program, and all undergraduates are Yale College students...and the nursing school and Yale College and completely separate entities).
    Actually, it's very common for these entry level master's NP programs not to offer a BSN. They figure all the candidates already have bachelor's degrees from their previous backgrounds. But there's another reason: many master's candidates quickly become disillusioned or they find they really need to make some money (looming loans, liiving expenses, etc.). If the program offered a BSN (bachelor's of science in nursing), you would find lots of the master's candidates would leave the program to work as an RN. Then Yale would lose the rest of the tuition monies for the master's portion of the program. If the candidate drops out after the first year, they have NO master's degree, no BSN. So they are in "limbo" land and are forced to complete the master's program to have some degree to show for it.

    Johns Hopkins offers a BSN and is totally flexible about people stopping out for a year to earn money as an RN before going on for their master's. Some people decide to continue working part time/fulltime and go to school part time. They allow candidates to apply as master's entry level candidates (so they only have to apply once to get into the bachelor's portion and master's portion).

    Hope that helps.
  3. by   AK556 APRN
    In order to offer a BSN, criteria (credit hours) would have to be increased. The accrediting bodies decide what needs to be included in curriculum, the Yale program does not fulfill BSN criteria. It is not a financial ploy to get more money out of students. People that want to drop out after the RN portion are not "left with nothing and forced to go on to get their Master's". The GEPNs must take and pass the NCLEX, that all RNs must take and pass in order to get an RN license, before being allowed to continue on in the Master's program. Several people in our class dropped out after the RN portion, sat for their board exam, and are working as RNs.

    I am not attempting to justify anything Yale does or doesn't do....I hated it there. It was the worst 2 years of my life and I am still healing from the ordeal. I don't regret going, but I would never do it again or recommend it to anyone I didn't hate! Thing is, graduate level credits rarely transfer (I looked into it), so after paying a semester of Ivy League tuition.....you are sort of stuck. Essentially, transferring means starting all over. I probably should have opted for that, but the longer you stay; the more "stuck" you are.

    Not getting a job is not a BSN thing. It is that many employers are reluctant to hire an APRN who has no/very little RN experience.
  4. by   smile123
    Quote from AK556 APRN
    People that want to drop out after the RN portion are not "left with nothing and forced to go on to get their Master's". The GEPNs must take and pass the NCLEX, that all RNs must take and pass in order to get an RN license, before being allowed to continue on in the Master's program. Several people in our class dropped out after the RN portion, sat for their board exam, and are working as RNs.
    I can understand your pain with the Yale program. You are correct in that GEPNs must pass the NCLEX in continue in the master's portion of the program at Yale. What I meant by "left with nothing" is that if the candidate dropped out after completing the nursing portion of classes and obtaining the RN, they would not have a master's degree nor a BSN. For some employers, that is a concern. I had some friends in other MEPN programs and they felt as though they were in limbo land because they wanted the master's degree but could not stand their program. True, they had their RN's, but not a master's.
    So they took out more loans to complete the rest of the program. It was a tough decision.

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