Will you get a job not matter what school you received NP degree? - page 3

by sav3alif3RN

5,904 Views | 25 Comments

Hi all, I'm currently applying to some NP programs. I've completed Georgia State's and Walden University's application already. GA State required the MAT (which I did not do as well on) and Walden did not require any testing. ... Read More


  1. 5
    Quote from zenman
    My problem with the GRE is that is a useless, Saturday time-wasting, money-making tool. I barely passed it yet made almost a 4.00 gpa. Get rid of it as well as multiple-choice tests and focus on creative learning instead of churning out robots.
    I'm not saying I disagree with you, but, as things stand now, it is a standard expectation for graduate programs in most other disciplines. In fact, I've had friends in other disciplines kvetch to me that nurses are lucky because we don't have a specialty GRE that we also have to take -- all my psychologist friends had to take the general GRE plus the psychology-specific GRE.

    IMO, as long as the GRE is a standard part of the grad school application process for everyone else, nurses just look like we don't want to be held to the same academic standards and expectations as other disciplines, and I think that reflects poorly on all of us.

    If the rest of academia decides to dump the GRE, I will certainly have no objection.
    kris_10, Gator Girl 2000, myelin, and 2 others like this.
  2. 4
    I think it depends to some degree what you anticipate you might want to do with your career in the long run. Where do you see your self in 10 years? In 20? There are career paths in which it will make a difference. If you are looking for a research/academia career at some point at a school of some distinction, yes, it certainly matters. If you are considering a PhD and have an idea with whom you may want to study, you may want to be certain your MSN is competitive. If you are interested in policy, it might matter.

    If you want to do direct patient clinic care, all you need to worry about is landing that first job. After that, no, I doubt it would matter much other than the networking. The larger research schools do have more notable faculty, and there is a lot to be said for "who you know." Getting to know those faculty can be invaluable if you want to be a leader in our field. Again, that has more to do with your long term career plans. 9 of 10 people probably do not care a whit about all of that.

    And I agree with Myelin!
    kris_10, agunno, elkpark, and 1 other like this.
  3. 1
    Hi Jaun,

    If your from Michigan, you should know that U of M is a health system that has both inpatient hospitals and outpatient clinics. Most of the clinics are on the same campus as the hospitals or within the hospitals. They also have outpatient clinics that are off campus around the Ann Arbor/Ypsi area. I have worked on both sides. This has allowed me the opportunity to find excellent clinical rotations.
    funfunfun550 likes this.
  4. 3
    Quote from mylojoRN
    Hi Jaun,

    If your from Michigan, you should know that U of M is a health system that has both inpatient hospitals and outpatient clinics. Most of the clinics are on the same campus as the hospitals or within the hospitals. They also have outpatient clinics that are off campus around the Ann Arbor/Ypsi area. I have worked on both sides. This has allowed me the opportunity to find excellent clinical rotations.
    Awesome. In that case you are fine doing your FNP at Walden. I am from Michigan. Went to WSU and had my clinicals at DMC, HFHS, VA, and Beaumont as an ACNP student. I currently work at a UC hospital where only UC students in all the NP programs rotate.
    funfunfun550, RNGO4IT, and mylojoRN like this.
  5. 0
    For those of us poor saps that have chosen to remain in rural America (Kansas here) going to a brick and mortar school is simply not an option. The nearest state school with an NP program is 100 miles away. God bless distance education. Those of us in the styx who desire to advance our education deserve the opportunity to do so and should not be punished because we make the decision to stay in the heartland. My online education was and has been nothing but high quality. If medical schools stopped death-gripping at tradition and utilized new technology to expand the reach of their programs, maybe we could assist in ending some of the primary care shortage out here!
  6. 0
    Quote from jreed4
    If medical schools stopped death-gripping at tradition and utilized new technology to expand the reach of their programs, maybe we could assist in ending some of the primary care shortage out here!
    The problem isn't the lack of "new technology" in medical schools; there are plenty of medical students and residents (and physicians, for that matter). The problem is that the vast majority of them don't want to go into primary care because it pays so much less than the "glamorous" specialties, and the few people who do want to go into it don't want to live and practice in the less desirable areas of the country.


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