Will you get a job not matter what school you received NP degree? - page 3

Hi all, I'm currently applying to some NP programs. I've completed Georgia State's and Walden University's application already. GA State required the MAT (which I did not do as well on) and Walden... Read More

  1. Visit  mylojoRN profile page
    2
    Its funny reading some of the post that state they would choose a candidate that has gone to a well known campus-based program over a candidate that has gone through a online unknown program. My question is why not choose the best candidate for the position? Just because someone went to a "well known, campus-based program" does not make them the best candidate. Matter of fact,don't we all take the exact same certification exam. I am not aware of an ANCC exam for candidates that have attended "well known, campus-based" universities. Another question I have is, if we are getting clinicals at well known, level 1 trauma hospitals, why does it matter that the theory portion of the program was taken online, at an 'unknown university? In my experience, the only place it matters is online in these types of forums. I respect everyone's opinions, however, if I can obtain the EXACT same degree and certifications for a lot less money that is the route I will always choose! Which is why my total loans thus far is 50,000 for both my BSN and MSN. My ADN was paid out of pocket. I am being precepted at U of M hospital, and already have a position waiting for me. This is due to my past nursing experience, not the school I am attending. I have a pretty good feeling that if I choose to move, the fact that I have worked at U of M for 10 years as a RN and however many years I will stay after obtaining my FNP, will open a lot of doors for me nationwide. So, I would suggest instead of making generalizations on who be hired and who will not be hired based on the program attended, provide potential students with the correct information which is there are many factors that contribute to being hired. The school, program alone is not the only factor that is considered. Once again, I will be refraining from reading these forums due to professionals giving biased OPINIONS instead of Evidence based facts. With that....go ahead and continue eating your young instead of encouraging and assisting them into the profession.
    PlumLove6 and funfunfun550 like this.
  2. Visit  zenman profile page
    2
    The federal government pays $$ to medical schools and hospitals for medical education and training. That's one reason medical students have clinical sites waiting on them...and we don't.
    funfunfun550 and JenRN30 like this.
  3. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    3
    Medical student training are not federally funded. Starting a medical school is not as easy either with strict oversight by LCME. Graduate medical education (residencies and fellowships) are funded positions. But these are individuals with an MD or DO degrees undergoing training. NP students are RN's with no license or certification to provide advanced practice nursing yet, hence, they are similar in stature as medical students. NP residencies if they do become commonplace should also be federally funded.
    myelin, funfunfun550, and JenRN30 like this.
  4. Visit  PacoUSA profile page
    2
    Quote from myelin
    Why are nurses so scared of the GRE? Not applying to a good program because you have an issue with the GRE is ridiculous. It's just a test. I see posts like this all the time "oh well, X program wants the GRE so I'm not going to apply"... come on. It's just a test and nursing is a field that is extremely lenient when it comes to GRE scores compared to other graduate fields.

    Go with the program that has the best reputation for where you want to practice. Choose one that provides the entirety of your education (including clinical rotations) and yes, bigger name programs have far more networking opportunities.
    I have to interject on this too, and it makes me laugh at how far nurses go to get out of taking an entrance exam. It's so stupid! I know someone who decided not to apply to Columbia University because they require the GRE to their ETP program, and instead opted to go to Long Island U, which is a less-prestigious school not requiring the GRE and costs pretty much the same.
    myelin and elkpark like this.
  5. Visit  zenman profile page
    1
    My problem with the GRE is that is a useless, Saturday time-wasting, money-making tool. I barely passed it yet made almost a 4.00 gpa. Get rid of it as well as multiple-choice tests and focus on creative learning instead of churning out robots.
    funfunfun550 likes this.
  6. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    0
    Quote from mylojoRN
    I am being precepted at U of M hospital, and already have a position waiting for me. This is due to my past nursing experience, not the school I am attending. I have a pretty good feeling that if I choose to move, the fact that I have worked at U of M for 10 years as a RN and however many years I will stay after obtaining my FNP, will open a lot of doors for me nationwide.
    Are you doing all in-patient rotations at U of M Hospital as an FNP student? That's odd if that's the case.
  7. Visit  harmonizer profile page
    0
    Quote from Agrippa
    If you had a candidate who went to say your state's flagship university's NP program vs. Walden/Phoenix/whatever other online university - who would you hire. I know that I would hire the one that went to the brick and mortar university. I really think that nursing is really hurting the profession by allowing such programs that are mediocre at best enter into the field. You don't see any online for profit MD, PT, DSS, etc programs.
    I second this! Go to Georgia State!
  8. Visit  elkpark profile page
    5
    Quote from zenman
    My problem with the GRE is that is a useless, Saturday time-wasting, money-making tool. I barely passed it yet made almost a 4.00 gpa. Get rid of it as well as multiple-choice tests and focus on creative learning instead of churning out robots.
    I'm not saying I disagree with you, but, as things stand now, it is a standard expectation for graduate programs in most other disciplines. In fact, I've had friends in other disciplines kvetch to me that nurses are lucky because we don't have a specialty GRE that we also have to take -- all my psychologist friends had to take the general GRE plus the psychology-specific GRE.

    IMO, as long as the GRE is a standard part of the grad school application process for everyone else, nurses just look like we don't want to be held to the same academic standards and expectations as other disciplines, and I think that reflects poorly on all of us.

    If the rest of academia decides to dump the GRE, I will certainly have no objection.
    kris_10, Gator Girl 2000, myelin, and 2 others like this.
  9. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    4
    I think it depends to some degree what you anticipate you might want to do with your career in the long run. Where do you see your self in 10 years? In 20? There are career paths in which it will make a difference. If you are looking for a research/academia career at some point at a school of some distinction, yes, it certainly matters. If you are considering a PhD and have an idea with whom you may want to study, you may want to be certain your MSN is competitive. If you are interested in policy, it might matter.

    If you want to do direct patient clinic care, all you need to worry about is landing that first job. After that, no, I doubt it would matter much other than the networking. The larger research schools do have more notable faculty, and there is a lot to be said for "who you know." Getting to know those faculty can be invaluable if you want to be a leader in our field. Again, that has more to do with your long term career plans. 9 of 10 people probably do not care a whit about all of that.

    And I agree with Myelin!
    kris_10, agunno, elkpark, and 1 other like this.
  10. Visit  mylojoRN profile page
    1
    Hi Jaun,

    If your from Michigan, you should know that U of M is a health system that has both inpatient hospitals and outpatient clinics. Most of the clinics are on the same campus as the hospitals or within the hospitals. They also have outpatient clinics that are off campus around the Ann Arbor/Ypsi area. I have worked on both sides. This has allowed me the opportunity to find excellent clinical rotations.
    funfunfun550 likes this.
  11. Visit  juan de la cruz profile page
    3
    Quote from mylojoRN
    Hi Jaun,

    If your from Michigan, you should know that U of M is a health system that has both inpatient hospitals and outpatient clinics. Most of the clinics are on the same campus as the hospitals or within the hospitals. They also have outpatient clinics that are off campus around the Ann Arbor/Ypsi area. I have worked on both sides. This has allowed me the opportunity to find excellent clinical rotations.
    Awesome. In that case you are fine doing your FNP at Walden. I am from Michigan. Went to WSU and had my clinicals at DMC, HFHS, VA, and Beaumont as an ACNP student. I currently work at a UC hospital where only UC students in all the NP programs rotate.
    funfunfun550, RNGO4IT, and mylojoRN like this.
  12. Visit  KansasFNP profile page
    0
    For those of us poor saps that have chosen to remain in rural America (Kansas here) going to a brick and mortar school is simply not an option. The nearest state school with an NP program is 100 miles away. God bless distance education. Those of us in the styx who desire to advance our education deserve the opportunity to do so and should not be punished because we make the decision to stay in the heartland. My online education was and has been nothing but high quality. If medical schools stopped death-gripping at tradition and utilized new technology to expand the reach of their programs, maybe we could assist in ending some of the primary care shortage out here!
  13. Visit  elkpark profile page
    0
    Quote from jreed4
    If medical schools stopped death-gripping at tradition and utilized new technology to expand the reach of their programs, maybe we could assist in ending some of the primary care shortage out here!
    The problem isn't the lack of "new technology" in medical schools; there are plenty of medical students and residents (and physicians, for that matter). The problem is that the vast majority of them don't want to go into primary care because it pays so much less than the "glamorous" specialties, and the few people who do want to go into it don't want to live and practice in the less desirable areas of the country.


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