PA's make more $$ than NP's?! - page 4

by GirloftheSun 31,123 Views | 39 Comments

I've considered NP school, and, after talking with several NPs who work in academics I was very disappointed to hear that PA's make more $$ than NPs. Especially since many NPs have years of nursing experience which I would think... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from 79Tango
    I have an "Alibi" to my post. In addition to DEA, ACLS & Clean license we care about having a Master's Degree! I learned this the hard way when we hired a PA from Florida. She was a PA-C with ER experience and all the required certifications etc. The problem was she had an Associate's degree in Physician Assistant studies and our credentialing department said NO.
    Unfortunate discrimination. Expect nothing less from HR policy!
  2. 0
    As was mentioned before, the PRIMARY reason why overall national average salaries are higher for PAs is b/c of the greater portion of PAs in higher paying specialites/surgery.

    There is regional variability but when you compare apples to apples, salaries for PA vs NP are usually pretty close.
  3. 0
    Quote from TakeBack
    Unfortunate discrimination. Expect nothing less from HR policy!
    I look at job postings daily, and every ad I have seen states for both PAs and NPs, "masters degree from an accredited school required." If I were a NP or a PA that had been grandfathered in, I'd mind my Ps and Qs in my present position b/c if you lose it, I think getting a new one w/o a MS would be very difficult in most places.

    My NP has an ADN and about 35 years of experience. I think she is the cat's pajamas, but I suspect if we were competing now for the same job, I might get it b/c I have a degree and she doesn't. I think 20 years from now, the same thing could happen with DNP vs MSN. Am I a better hire b/c I have a MSN and my NP does not? Oh he// no, not by a looooong shot, lol. But there is no denying that in the modern world, I have the advantage. I don't think that is discrimination, so much as an evolution of minimum expectations.
  4. 0
    Quote from linearthinker
    I look at job postings daily, and every ad I have seen states for both PAs and NPs, "masters degree from an accredited school required." If I were a NP or a PA that had been grandfathered in, I'd mind my Ps and Qs in my present position b/c if you lose it, I think getting a new one w/o a MS would be very difficult in most places.

    My NP has an ADN and about 35 years of experience. I think she is the cat's pajamas, but I suspect if we were competing now for the same job, I might get it b/c I have a degree and she doesn't. I think 20 years from now, the same thing could happen with DNP vs MSN. Am I a better hire b/c I have a MSN and my NP does not? Oh he// no, not by a looooong shot, lol. But there is no denying that in the modern world, I have the advantage. I don't think that is discrimination, so much as an evolution of minimum expectations.
    The bigger issue is what are we doing to the applicant pool by creating a situation, as you describe it, that favors inflated inexperience over the converse.
  5. 0
    I was merely commenting upon why it does not amount to "discrimination" when an employer opts for more education over less. Of course they are going to miss some strong candidates, that goes without saying. Any ADN prepared RN will tell you that. In making a choice, something will always be lost. TPTB have decided to choose education over experience in some cases. That is their choice to make, and a possibility I'd be cognizant of. NPs/PAs with tons of experience still lacking the degree of choice (whatever it is today, lol) can always go back and get that degree and maintain their competitive edge. I can get the degree, but there is no substitute for the experience, and I just can't go invest 2-3 years and be awarded 20 years experience, lol. They still have the advantage, if they choose to take it. I don't think the employers or rest of us can be blamed if they choose not to.
  6. 0
    It's not discrimination in the legal sense, of course. But when you step back to the HR mindset- which equivocates degree with competence- it will undoubtedly filter out highly qualified candidates who deliver gold standard care (the reason we all got into this for the first place, right?)

    Degree creep is an unavoidable reality. NPs are all masters. There are maybe 4-5 PA programs that don't offer masters at my last count. PA will eventually be mandatory masters. I got mine post bacc for your reasons as well.

    I just hope that no one on this forum is deceived into thinking that the masters, for the PA/NP level of education and training, makes a better provider. There are legions of non masters PAs/NPs out there to prove the contrary.
  7. 0
    I may be stating the obvious here (I do seem to have a gift for it), but in response to the OP, I have the following thought - Many academicians who are not ALSO practicing in the field have skewed sense of reality outside of academics. They may THINK they know about demand/salary/expectations in a particular field, but may not, in fact, have that information.

    I've had instructors who are not actually in the medical field who have said opposite things from each other. Who to believe? Who knows where the information is coming from. If you really want to do the research on a particular field, talk to the people who are active in that field. And unless you plan to stay in your part of the country forever, then talk to people in different parts of the country.
    So I would talk to NP's, PA's and hiring managers from different areas. Most professionals, I've found, are more than happy to talk about what they do. If you are going to put the time and money into advanced education, it is well worth doing the research before you start.
  8. 0
    holy thread necromancy!

    Anyway, the reality is that PAs do not make more than NPs, once you account for specialty and gender. A female surgical NP makes the same as a female surgical PA, etc.
  9. 1
    Here's the latest comparison, PA-NP head to head per specialty
    In some the difference is marginal, in others, significant.

    National Salary Report 2011 on ADVANCE for NPs & PAs
    Hoping4RNin2010 likes this.
  10. 0
    Interesting stuff, thanks. I don't like that they do the gender breakdown at the end, I wish they'd include it by specialty.


Top